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Yo yo! Ti's my first time posting here, but it seems like a good place to ask such a question. Recently I've been getting into astronomy, really interesting stuff imo. And I've been considering getting a telescope (if the weather clears up within the next few months). Currently I'm just viewing by the naked eye, but since it's been a full moon I was unable to see as many stars as I would otherwise. But I'll stop rambling and get to my question.

Basically, I've always really accosiated the view of telescopes being just, unclear and blurry. Mainly because I always saw it as strange towards if you can really get a good view, that of course isnt too blurry, just by zooming in and focusing a bit with a telescope. Is that just a misconception of mine? or are telescopes usually rather blurry? Sorry for my newbie question, ahah.

My second question is where exactly I should look for a telescope if I do decide to buy one. I'm in the UK by the way.

That should be all for now. Any and all replies are appreciated.

Thank you~ 
 

Edited by doinurmop

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Hello and a warm welcome to the SGL. If the telescope is properly focused the view should be pin sharp, as long as you do not try to use too much magnification for the particular scope and the atmospheric conditions are good.

As for purchasing a telescope new, I would always recommend a reputable dealer such as FLO this sites sponsor. Money can be saved buying second hand but care must be taken and it is better to seek advice from an experienced observer.

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doinurmop - I got my first 'scope in December - I got mine from FLO.  Ask on these forums and find out what 'scope they recommend, and then treat yourself to some large FLO cardboard boxes full of goodies.  Don't be tempted to get one from a chain-store or museum! 

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43 minutes ago, laudropb said:

Hello and a warm welcome to the SGL. If the telescope is properly focused the view should be pin sharp, as long as you do not try to use too much magnification for the particular scope and the atmospheric conditions are good.

As for purchasing a telescope new, I would always recommend a reputable dealer such as FLO this sites sponsor. Money can be saved buying second hand but care must be taken and it is better to seek advice from an experienced observer.

Thank you~! And oh alrighty then! I have heard that more magnification is not always better. Infact I've heard that the bigger a telescope is in diameter, the more of a clearer image you'll usually get. Thanks for answering that, probs take a bit of trial and error with the focusing to get it just right, but it should be worth it. As for atmospheric conditions, that's to be expected, even though england is unpredictable.

As for FLO, i'll definitely check them out. They seem to have some pretty good prices on telescopes and the accesories. And yeah, If I were to buy a telescope i'd rather want it brand new anyway.

9 minutes ago, JOC said:

doinurmop - I got my first 'scope in December - I got mine from FLO.  Ask on these forums and find out what 'scope they recommend, and then treat yourself to some large FLO cardboard boxes full of goodies.  Don't be tempted to get one from a chain-store or museum! 

Real surprised I have not heard about FLO before this site then. Once I get a hold of my budget, I'll definitely ask around on the forums what people reccomend.

Seeing large boxes full of goodies will probably be the best part. Frankly,even if the weather is not great for star viewing, the looks of all telescopes have a lovely aesthectic to them, which frankly makes them great to look at in general. Also yeah I've heard buying from a chain store, is quite the dumb idea. Though as for museum I've never heard of them even selling telescopes.

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Recommendations about what to buy can only be suggested  when we know what your aims are.
Whether you just wish to observe the skies in a general way, or do you have any specific Ideas about
whether you want to delve into Deep Sky objects, Planetary, plus eventually doing Astro. photography too.
The Budget you have to spend would also have a bearing on what members would suggest is a good buy for your Buck
so to speak. One clue I can give you, the larger the lens, or Mirror, the more detail will be revealed, but not for 
every object you observe.  Stars never increase in size through an Eyepiece, however large a lens or mirror you have.They are much too far away
to see other than a point of light. 
If you live in a Town/City that may have an Astronomical Society, you could do worse than pay them a Visit,
and ask permission to join them on one of their meetings nights, a meeting when they intend to have observing sessions.
You then could have a look and even use members telescopes, in order to glean some Idea of what it is you prefer.
There are  used Instruments  sites on the Internet too, whereby you might pick up a bargain when you decide
what it is you would like. A word of warning though, seek advice fro the membership here  before committing your money
to any Item for sale. You will be advised accordingly.



 

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I don't know what you are looking at budget wises, but I was truly astonished at how little it cost to set-up with a really serviceable telescope - I splurged a fair bit to get a goto unit on mine, but really it is not necessary and if you have £300 to chuck at the project the guys here will be able to direct you to some really good kit.  For example you can get manual one the same size as mine, with a fixed length tube (mine collapses) for £285 a fact which I find is really astonishing when I see what some chain stores charge for far lesser instruments.  So £285 will get you a 'proper' telescope that will last years and years if you need it to and be capable of viewing all sorts of thing through.  There will be loads of options around that sort of budget and I was just surprised that you could get into the hobby that cheaply. 

Edited by JOC

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13 minutes ago, barkis said:

Recommendations about what to buy can only be suggested  when we know what your aims are.
Whether you just wish to observe the skies in a general way, or do you have any specific Ideas about
whether you want to delve into Deep Sky objects, Planetary, plus eventually doing Astro. photography too.
The Budget you have to spend would also have a bearing on what members would suggest is a good buy for your Buck
so to speak. One clue I can give you, the larger the lens, or Mirror, the more detail will be revealed, but not for 
every object you observe.  Stars never increase in size through an Eyepiece, however large a lens or mirror you have.They are much too far away
to see other than a point of light. 

Of course. While my aims may indeed change, frankly since I'd like to be both balanced on deep sky objects, and planetary, my aim would most likely be to view it in a general way. Since it'd be my frist time with a telescope, I dont really have a specific aim, or plan. AS for astrophtoography, depending on how much I'd need to put out to future proof for that, I probably wont be planning for it at from the start at-least. 

 

20 minutes ago, JOC said:

I don't know what you are looking at budget wises, but I was truly astonished at how little it cost to set-up with a really serviceable telescope - I splurged a fair bit to get a goto unit on mine, but really it is not necessary and if you £300 to chuck at the project the guys here will be able to direct you to some really good kit.  For example you can get manual one the same size as mine, with a fixed length tube (mine collapses) for £285 a fact which I find is really astonishing when I see what some chain stores charge for far lesser instruments.  So £285 will get you a 'proper' telescope that will last years and years if you need it to and be capable of viewing all sorts of thing through.  There will be loads of options around that sort of budget and I was just surprised that you could get into the hobby that cheaply. 

Frankly if I had to guess.. My budget could be anywhere from £200-£300. But before I give a solid answer, I really need to sort that out first.

And yeah, I'm also quite surprised by the cost, it's impressive. Also I've definitely seen people use those, online, but I probs wont want a goto myself, I'd rather search for my target, by hand.  £285 though, that's quite bloody good. And yeah, chain-stores are always gonna sell lesser things for outrageous prices. 

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I was new to this game at the beginning of the year when I got my first scope- once I had taken advice from the natives herabouts. The advice was sound and as a result I have experienced trhe delights of both Lunar, Planetary and Deep Space observing.

My rig is the Skywatcher detailed below. I got mine at a reduced price as it was a customer return to another retailer. Always worth looking aht the specials available from the supplers of Astronomy Shiny.

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