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Venus crescent through my 4.5" reflector


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I went out this evening to image Venus, I'm just after starting planetary imaging and I want to get as much Venus images as I can before it gets too low in the sky. I recorded a 1500 frame video of Venus and I stacked and processed the image in Registax 6.1. I was surprised by my image and I'm glad it turned out alright, definitely my best Venus image so far.

Tell me what you think! I would love to hear your opinions, and most importantly how I can improve.

Thanks and clear skies!

Adam

Venus2 processed.jpg.jpg

Edited by A budding astronomer
misspelled "crescent"
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Nice image, Adam. I've also been imaging Venus recently as it shrinks in phase. Using my 127mm Mak as a glorified zoom lens for my Nikon DSLR, I attached a 2x barlow and a variable polarizing filter for this shot:

ASTRONOMY%20-%20VENUS%20PRIME%20FOCUS%20

The filter helped lots in cutting down the glare and showing off the crescent shape.

 

Clear skies,

Reggie

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53 minutes ago, orion25 said:

Nice image, Adam. I've also been imaging Venus recently as it shrinks in phase. Using my 127mm Mak as a glorified zoom lens for my Nikon DSLR, I attached a 2x barlow and a variable polarizing filter for this shot:

ASTRONOMY%20-%20VENUS%20PRIME%20FOCUS%20

The filter helped lots in cutting down the glare and showing off the crescent shape.

 

Clear skies,

Reggie

Hello Reggie, thank you! I will try out some filters with the image, see if they make a difference.

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The Variable-Polarizer Filters, which come as a set of two, certainly work wonders on our Sister-Planet - or Hell-Planet as put in many articles.

It certainly is a great choice for those who have not yet made a foray into the world of filters! And not very expensive either.

Great shots there, both of you!

Keep going, please -

Dave

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Nice shot! It's a tricky target!

I reckon if you can get the image scale up it may help cut the glare a little. Focus and exposure are the key points I guess. This is a single shot with an iPhone through a 5.5" Mak.

IMG_9512.JPG

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1 hour ago, Stu said:

Nice shot! It's a tricky target!

I reckon if you can get the image scale up it may help cut the glare a little. Focus and exposure are the key points I guess. This is a single shot with an iPhone through a 5.5" Mak.

IMG_9512.JPG

Hi Stu, Thanks. I will try bringing down the exposure if I can catch Venus again.

Adam

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