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Alfian

Most detailed Luna map/atlas?

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I have quite a few books/maps/atlas's of the moon including the Cambridge photographic atlas and the Philips moon map which is quite detailed. I also have the Virtual Luna atlas on the computer. I was wondering what in members experience is the most detailed map or atlas in terms of indicating the name/location of the smaller Luna featues?

There are some very expensive books out there so cost effectiveness comes into the equation too, but it would be interesting to know just the same.

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If i need Luna detail i tend to go with a Phillips Lunar observing guide or virtual atlas on pc 

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24 minutes ago, Alfian said:

 the most detailed map or atlas in terms of indicating the name/location of the smaller Luna featues?

Cost effective = free ! The most detailed I have found is the USGS (the names authority no less!) at

https://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/

click on the 'Earth(moon)' icon,  enter (for example) a feature in the area of interest (Grimaldi) and in the subsequent list click on which is the one you want (Grimaldi) and in the result text on the left of the map of that feature, download the pdf link beside the "Quad" index (LAC-73) . You will than have a map of that feature in a map of the surrounding area.

I may have missed something to get the feature names on map on the web interface , but magically the pdf so downloaded will contain feature names as well.

Very handy for filling in small features between those commonly identified in the usual books.

 

 

Edited by SilverAstro
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10 minutes ago, SilverAstro said:

Cost effective = free ! The most detailed I have found is the USGS (the names authority no less!) at

https://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/

click on the 'Earth(moon)' icon,  enter (for example) a feature in the area of interest (Grimaldi) and in the subsequent list click on which is the one you want (Grimaldi) and in the result text on the left of the map of that feature, download the pdf link beside the "Quad" index (LAC-73) . You will than have a map of that feature in a map of the surrounding area.

I may have missed something to get the feature names on map on the web interface , but magically the pdf so downloaded will contain feature names as well.

Very handy for filling in small features between those commonly identified in the usual books.

 

 

That's very good! Thank you.

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Not sure about most detailed, but Quickmap is hugely detailed and has some great features. For example, draw a line across the terrain and get an altitude/gradient graph of the terrain, draw a box and you get a scalable and rotatable 3d visualisation. It also has layers for albedo (at a range of wavelengths), altitude, geology and a million and one other things. I've only just started using it but impression is it is an extremely powerful tool (like a comprehensive 3d GIS of the moon). 

http://target.lroc.asu.edu/q3/

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40 minutes ago, billyharris72 said:

Not sure about most detailed, but Quickmap is hugely detailed and has some great features. For example, draw a line across the terrain and get an altitude/gradient graph of the terrain, draw a box and you get a scalable and rotatable 3d visualisation. It also has layers for albedo (at a range of wavelengths), altitude, geology and a million and one other things. I've only just started using it but impression is it is an extremely powerful tool (like a comprehensive 3d GIS of the moon). 

http://target.lroc.asu.edu/q3/

That's pretty impressive, must explore this one. Thanks.

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Hi Paul, apologies for only just picking this up. Another great resource, thank you.

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I've found that lunar atlases and maps are ALL woefully inadequate as far as detail is concerned, with even a small scope revealing far more detail than that recorded on the map. For my money I'd say the map with the greatest detail is Wilkins Map of the Moon. Sometimes criticized for containing inaccuracies, it is actually a masterpiece of observation. It is highly complex, but full of intricate and fascinating detail that can be observed through the telescope and which other charts omit. The difficulty comes in understanding Wilkins style. It's a lifetimes work from an excellent observer, which will be of great value to any serious lunar observer. His book THE MOON by Wilkins and Moore is well worth acquiring if you can find one.

Mike

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On 28/03/2017 at 19:02, mikeDnight said:

the map with the greatest detail is Wilkins Map of the Moon

Amen to that. Wilkins can be overwhelming in his detail compared to Rukl, but they both have their uses. Rukl is very useful for finding your way around but Wilkins shows you what you'll see when you get there. If you don't have both, I highly recommend you get them both.

I'm preparing a talk for the local AS on the Moon, I love maps and am fascinated by the history of science as much as current endeavours. So the talk will have a big focus on the history of man's study of our satellite. Not wanting to break the spine of my copy of Wilkin's Moon in the scanner I went hunting for digital copy I can use in some slides. I found this (hence reviving this thread) http://www.alpo-astronomy.org/publications/Monographs page.html

They have some other useful resources for the historian too including Schmidt's Mondcharte.

5941b56fe5a5b_ScreenShot2017-06-14at23_13_56.thumb.png.bfaaf9252c672bc632487038a9ab65d4.png

 

 

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I still find the Hatfield Photographic Lunar Atlas one of the most useful guides to identifying features on the Moon. It is the only one I have found that has a series of photos for each region taken under different lighting conditions. The colongitude of the moon and hence the angle of incident sunlight really can make a huge difference. This is a point well illustrated in Harold Hills Portfolio of Lunar Drawings.  Of course maps and atlases have to be used to aid in finding your targets in the first place but the fascination I find in Lunar observing and sketching is that the view is nearly always different each time I observe.

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5 hours ago, Moonshane said:

Moon Mars and Venus is a small version of the expensive one by Rukl. Very detailed. I got mine for a fiver but it's more expensive now

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0600362191/sr=1-6/qid=1497617399/ref=olp_product_details?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=1497617399&sr=1-6 

 

I have that one too Shane and paid a similar price. It has that slightly old yellowing page look to it but a very useful little book.

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