Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_lunar_landings.thumb.jpg.b50378d0845690d8a03305a49923eb40.jpg

Recommended Posts

Hi! 

I just remembered I had made a short gif of Neptune this summer over two nights. My fast reflector has a huge field of view, so you can't really make out any detail on the planet's surface. But you can still definitely make it out, and see that Neptune did indeed wander over the time of a few nights - a planet indeed!

Enjoy, and let me know what you think!

neptune-change.gif

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice images, it would be really cool if some one made a really long one over several months.....I saw Uranus once, I shall have to try for Neptune, too. :) 

Is that a moon on its right? It moves with the planet, and I think there's another on the left--I'm sure that's not just noise.

John

Edited by JohnSadlerAstro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, JohnSadlerAstro said:

Nice images, it would be really cool if some one made a really long one over several months.....I saw Uranus once, I shall have to try for Neptune, too. :) 

Is that a moon on its right? It moves with the planet, and I think there's another on the left--I'm sure that's not just noise.

John

Cool! I think I see what you're talking about in the frame in which Neptune is farther to the bottom left. But I'm not sure if I can find it in the second frame. Do you think you could circle the potential moon(s) in both frames please? Maybe in a screenshot? That's such a great observation, and I'd love to look into it more!!!!! I really hope you can show me:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

Sorry about the late reply, I've just done a quick stretch of a couple of screen shots, and got this: you will need to open them up full size and then zoom to see clearly. I'm pretty sure there's one on each side, the first frame doesn't show the left hand one very well, but the second does clearly, so it might just be noise; the left hand ne is almost certainly Triton.  Do you have the days the photos were taken on so I can confirm if moons were in those positions? If so, congratulations on catching a Mag. 14 moon!

I apologize for my ridiculous eye for detail, just had nothing better to do so thought I'd look see if you had caught the moons :D.

John

58befb0a3b91c_Neptunemotion-GettingStartedWithImaging-StargazersLounge-InternetExplorer07_03_201718_02_17.thumb.png.3745a1ef1f29abb4520b4e0fd41f41f6.png58befb0d19384_Neptunemotion-GettingStartedWithImaging-StargazersLounge-InternetExplorer07_03_201718_02_28.thumb.png.033c48a68eb7be2189ce1fe3179a28cc.png

Edited by JohnSadlerAstro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, JohnSadlerAstro said:

Hi,

Sorry about the late reply, I've just done a quick stretch of a couple of screen shots, and got this: you will need to open them up full size and then zoom to see clearly. I'm pretty sure there's one on each side, the first frame doesn't show the left hand one very well, but the second does clearly, so it might just be noise; the left hand ne is almost certainly Triton.  Do you have the days the photos were taken on so I can confirm if moons were in those positions? If so, congratulations on catching a Mag. 14 moon!

I apologize for my ridiculous eye for detail, just had nothing better to do so thought I'd look see if you had caught the moons :D.

John

58befb0a3b91c_Neptunemotion-GettingStartedWithImaging-StargazersLounge-InternetExplorer07_03_201718_02_17.thumb.png.3745a1ef1f29abb4520b4e0fd41f41f6.png58befb0d19384_Neptunemotion-GettingStartedWithImaging-StargazersLounge-InternetExplorer07_03_201718_02_28.thumb.png.033c48a68eb7be2189ce1fe3179a28cc.png

Thanks so much for doing this! I never would have noticed on my own! I took the second image in the gif on July 26, 2016. Let me know if you can identify it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By AstroRuz
      Skywatcher 150/1200 f8 planetary Newtonian.
      Bought this originally intending to set up a planetary rig but circumstances call for sale.
      Will come with eyepieces and a collimation eyepiece. Not used by myself and has seen very little use. Mirrors in good condition
      Collection only
      £50



    • By BinocularSky
      The latest edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have:
      * Asteroid occultation of a bright star
      * Neptune appulse with bright star
      * Vesta getting easier
      * Three Mira stars near maximum
      This should be enough to keep you gainfully occupied with your binoculars or small telescope. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab, where you can subscribe (also free, of course) to have it emailed each month, and get archived copies. 

    • By LachlanR
      I’m looking for a supplier of telescope quality mirror sets at 100mm f4, preferably parabolic. Does anyone have suggestions? I would specially commission if necessary. 
    • By BinocularSky
      The August edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have:
      * A grazing occultation of a bright star
      * Moon occulting stars in the Hyades
      * See both ice giants as well as Vesta
      * Review of the Celestron EclipSmart 10x25 solar binocular
      I hope it helps you to get the best out of these late summer nights with your binoculars or small telescopes.
      To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.
      Warning: Do not attempt to observe the Sun with any optical system that is not specifically designed for the purpose.
    • By Cosmic Geoff
      With reluctance I am looking to sell my 200mm aperture f5 Helios Newtonian OTA. (Helios is a brand that became incorporated into Skywatcher - this closely resembles Skywatcher OTAs)
      The Helios is offered with single speed rack & pinion focuser, tube rings, 22 to 1.25" adaptor, dovetail bar and grab handle for £90 o.n.o.  In good condition except that the dovetail bar appears to be discoloured by exposure to sunlight.
      I have not used the telescope for many months and with a persistent problem in my right arm my enthusiasm for moving heavy kit around has diminished.
      Buyer to collect from North Bucks.
      Offered as option with the OTA: EQ5 mount with RA drive + 6 volt sealed lead-acid battery +charger + standard and extra long Dec slow motion manual shafts. £150. Condition - used but working.
       
      If I sell the OTA I will be looking to dispose of its accessories:
      9x50 Skywatcher straight finder - in excellent condition except that the small plastic dust cap is missing.
      Cheshire collimator, boxed, as new.
      Helical fine focuser, range 10mm, ID 1.25", screws into 2"adapter.
      3x Datysun Barlow, as new, boxed.
      Widefield eyepiece, 22mm f.l., 30mm body (note not 1.25")  with built in focus, works well with this telescope.
      Plastic collimation cap (no cost).
      This bundle would cost around £114 new - offered if bought with scope at £75 o.n.o.
       
       





×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.