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Moon Occults Aldebaran (again)!


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We're currently in a pattern of monthly occultations of Aldebaran by the moon because of Luna's position relative to the ecliptic. I caught some cool images of the occultation as it happened! Here is just before the event at about 10:50 p.m. :

 ASTRONOMY%20-%20MOON%20-%20ALDEBARAN%20O

and just after, at about midnight:

ASTRONOMY%20-%20MOON%20-%20ALDEBARAN%20O
The moon took on a sepia glow as it descended upon the western horizon.

Don't you just love our cosmos?

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Between it's being -1°F. outside, my neighbor's tree, and the knife-edged Adirondack Mountains of New York directly to my West - it was pretty much D.O.A. for me, but the Moon, from what I could see, was a lovely yellow-shade as filtered through our orange-peel of an atmosphere.

There's always something to love up there!

Dave

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Great capture Reggie. From the UK I managed to view the moon occulting Gamma Tauri which was really nice to see. It was also interesting to see Aldebaran closing in, knowing that its own occultation would be visible to you on the other side of the pond after it had set here. Fascinating!

I would love to have been on the 'grazing line' where it would have been blinking in and out of view, sometimes not instantly due to its size, behind the lunar mountains.

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1 hour ago, Stub Mandrel said:

Nice one Reggie,

I started to find out if this was going to be visible from the UK, but after one look out the window, I gace up :-(

Here's one I prepared earlier ;-)

The_moon_soon_to_occult_delta_gemini.thumb.jpg.5e0074430d0a6f8f0eb746a746f241aa.jpg

Great shot, Neil. Well worth the effort :happy7:. It's interesting how much of an effect our longitude (and latitude) can have on viewing occultations like this.

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3 hours ago, Stu said:

Great capture Reggie. From the UK I managed to view the moon occulting Gamma Tauri which was really nice to see. It was also interesting to see Aldebaran closing in, knowing that its own occultation would be visible to you on the other side of the pond after it had set here. Fascinating!

I would love to have been on the 'grazing line' where it would have been blinking in and out of view, sometimes not instantly due to its size, behind the lunar mountains.

Thanks, Stu. I also have video I shot in my handicam in which you can actually see Aldebaran disappear in real time behind the moon. I'll post that shortly.

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3 hours ago, laudropb said:

Very nice capture Reggie. Nothing but solid cloud cover here.

Thanks, John. I hope those clouds break. Are you going to do any more imaging soon?

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4 hours ago, Dave In Vermont said:

Between it's being -1°F. outside, my neighbor's tree, and the knife-edged Adirondack Mountains of New York directly to my West - it was pretty much D.O.A. for me, but the Moon, from what I could see, was a lovely yellow-shade as filtered through our orange-peel of an atmosphere.

There's always something to love up there!

Dave

It's been springtime down here for weeks. I'm taking full advantage of it!

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