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Peter Rosen

A Journey to Jupiter Project

14 posts in this topic

Hi all,

Some days ago I released a new project at animating the cloudbelts of Jupiter and the GRS.

In order to have an almost continuous monitoring of Jupiter, we contacted 91 amateurs from all around the world to ask for permission to use their images in this project.

It took a full year and thousands of hours of work to get all the pieces in place but I'm quite pleased with the results.

 

John Rogers, Director of the Jupiter section at the British Astronomical Association has written:

"An amazing animated map of Jupiter's winds has been released by Peter Rosen and colleagues in Sweden, portraying real observations from images by amateur astronomers over 3 months in 2014-2015. The map (in various projections and perspectives) shows Jupiter's winds in glorious detail, and this is by far the best such movie ever produced from ground-based images -- worthy to compare with the Cassini movie."

I hope you enjoy it

It is now up and running at https://youtu.be/YZc1Y662jtk

 

/*Peter Rosén

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Simply stunning! :headbang:

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Fascinating to see the giant in motion. Wow!

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Wow excellent very mesmerising in places and amazed at the amount of detail that had been captured,well done to you and everyone else's hard work.👍

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Terrific video. Well done to all who participated.

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A mammoth task executed to perfection, a really beautiful animation, you must be thrilled

with the result, I could watch it all night, a very big thank you.  

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Fascinating video. Thanks for posting. 

John

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Thank you very much for your comments.

 

Quote

Wow excellent very mesmerising in places and amazed at the amount of detail that had been captured,well done to you and everyone else's hard work.👍

Thank you Jonn, the amount of detail is also what made this project so difficult as even tiny mapping errors will show upp as a misalignment and double contours etc...

Interestingly, in the end, the high definition is carried along by the best images while those of lesser quality merely show up as a little local turbulence, they don't reduce the overall quality the way I was afraid they would.

 

Quote

A mammoth task executed to perfection, a really beautiful animation, you must be thrilled

with the result, I could watch it all night, a very big thank you.  

Thank you Ron,

my friend Göran Strand said about the same to me, that he could watch it for hours and asked me to put online the basic cylindrical map and the polar ones, just looping over and over again and that is the way that I like to watch them as well.

In my opinion, there are so many tiny vortices at all latitudes that are thrilling to follow and you get a better understanding of the dynamics of the flows. 

That's basically the ultimate scope of this video.

/*Peter R

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Nothing further to add really, a wonderful project and amazingly well processed and presented.

I will spend a long time viewing this over and again, it shows so much in terms of the dynamics of the systems.

Great work!!!!!

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I've only just caught up with this. Really stunning and shows what can still be achieved by amateurs. I can see me referring to this for comparison when we get some decent conditions for viewing. The result is obviously the result of much  hard work for which you and your collaborators should be congratulated. Well done Peter 

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Late to this flat-out gorgeous video too....*utterly* beautiful and captivating, my utmost congrats and thanks to all involved.

I never realised/appreciated the sheer speed difference in the belts, and ...the 'little red spot'  below the GRS - I don't think my eyes/scopes can resolve that, but I'm sure gonna try!

A *big* ghost-thanks for posting :)

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Many thanks for this terrific depiction of big Jove in motion.
Many contributions, and lots of work to create this animation, and we're grateful to all involved in the project.
Great stuff indeed :icon_salut::icon_salut:.

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wow that's phenomenal! Congratulations.

 

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