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jambouk

Penumbral eclipse

26 posts in this topic

I'll give it a go if the weather permits of course. :) 

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We will.   :icon_biggrin:

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It might require photometer ? !

Edited by SilverAstro

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Will the eclipse be readily visible to the naked eye or will I need a scope to observe the shadow?

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47 minutes ago, colin2007 said:

Will the eclipse be readily visible to the naked eye or will I need a scope to observe the shadow?

It should be but it is going to be very subtle. 

Edited by johnfosteruk
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1 hour ago, johnfosteruk said:

It should be but it is going to be very subtle. 

Thanks for that johnfosteruk

Weather doesn`t look good here for Friday in Essex. In fact snow is forecast. Looks like the eclipse could be clouded out for me. Was thinking of perhaps doing some naked eye sketches of the event if it is clear.

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Im actually being forecast for clear after 12 and 50% cloud from 20:00 onwards... which says to me I might have an actual chance to fire off some frames, and see if I can catch the phasing...  Be nice to actually get out with a scope as opposed to a umbrella!

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If it's clear ill be out with my Mak!

:happy7:

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1 hour ago, spaceman_spiff said:

If it's clear ill be out with my Mak!

:happy7:

If it's raining, I'll be out with my mac too!

:D

 

( er, I'll get my coat...no, really....)

Edited by ghostdance
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6 minutes ago, ghostdance said:

If it's raining, I'll be out with my mac too!

:D

 

( er, I'll get my coat...no, really....)

I set you up for that!

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30 minutes ago, spaceman_spiff said:

I set you up for that!

And I thank'ee kind sir ;)

Was just irresistible!

Edited by ghostdance
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fingers crossed for a clear sky and I will be out there for the first proper run of my new equipment :)

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Given the current 100% cloud cover I won't be getting my hopes up

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May have spoke too soon, after 6 hrs of snow flurries - sky is now clearing

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Clear here ATM. Fingers crossed

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Penumbral shadow starting to show quite clearly now. The moons disk seems darker across it's NE limb.

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Yes, it's worth a look. Had a few views between the clouds - naked eye and binoculars. Although subtle, the shadow is certainly noticeable 

 

andrew

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While capturing data for a time lapse in observing naked eye and with bins and it's getting as pronounced in vis as it is on screen now. 

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Total cloud here, so no Mak ( or indeed mac ) for me and no penumbral treats :(

I look forward to seeing any images by the fortunate!

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Just finished capturing some images a few hours ago. Will post, soon!

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I'm just putting 110 sets of data together into a time lapse after a well earned lie in :) Will also post, soon.

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Could just see where the Moon was by its light, but too cloudy to actually see it - I saw the light, you saw the whole of the Moon ;)

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I thought the penumbral shadow would be too subtle, so hadn't planned to observe. However, on looking out at about 00:30, I realised the shadow was quite striking. I set up the Meade 127mm ED for a few pics. This one was 4 minutes after maximum eclipse.

Regards, Mike.

Img_5367.jpg

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7 minutes ago, mcrowle said:

I thought the penumbral shadow would be too subtle, so hadn't planned to observe. However, on looking out at about 00:30, I realised the shadow was quite striking.

That's a nice image Mike.  I too was surprised how well the shadow showed -  it was apparently a very good penumbral eclipse.

andrew

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