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adavies660

North West Astronomy Festival 2017 dates

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Now in it's 5th year

This event is a non profit event and in previous years all profits went towards us working with young people disengaged from education. 

This year all profits will go towards astronomy outreach in the North West of England and the profits will be divided up between all clubs and societies who participate at the festival by way of a stall/outreach.

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Just giving this thread a little bump :smiley:

I'm thinking of coming up to this event in July. Anyone else thinking of coming along ?

Here is the website, for anyone thinking about it:

http://nwastrofest.co.uk/

 

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Well worth a visit, my 4th year it's great fun and a good restaurant. 

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Hello.  Think i will make a visit Saturday AM.  Just up the road for me these days. 

 

John

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Just got back its a nice event met lots of folk very friendly loads to talk about...had a great time will go next year

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Are there any details of a 2018 event at a similar (or close venue ) please so I can add it to my calendar.Thanks

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