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Jon Sales

Celestron AVX 6N or Skywatcher 150pds

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I'm looking to save for a new scope and want it to replace my trusty Skywatcher 127mak. 

Im looking at either the Celestron AVX 6N Newtonian or going for the Skywatcher 150pds on an EQ5. 

Wondering what the difference is in the scopes themselves. 

I want it for both visual and prime focus AP. 

Anyone have any experience with the AVX?

I know a lot of people have the Skywatcher but from reading up the AVX mount is tuned for AP. 

 

Thanks in advance. 

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Can't speak for the telescopes, Jon. But my reason for getting into Astrophotography led me to what I have. I initially wanted a 6" Celestron Refractor. But as I dug in and learned more about how to pursue my objective, Nebula, I found myself narrowing down and refining what I would need, within my budget, to do my best.

But I am an AVX owner/user. My initial experiences were bad with my AVX. After an initial replacement by Celestron, then a second return where they replaced the motor drive boards in the mounts head, I have ONLY fed it battery power and retired the Celestron AC to DC mount power adapter. Since then, all has worked well.

Due to my extensive electrical background, I'm pretty sure that when Celestron moved from Japan, to China, the factory began using electronic components of China origin and suffered a quality control issue in many of the NexStar operated mounts. Based on my seeing posts in many places of motor drive board failures in different mounts, but a commonality of the same NexStar Go-To being used in them. Using strictly battery power, which is pure DC, (not transformed and rectified) has alleviated all my earlier woes. And since, I've been able to slowly find my way into imaging I'm very happy with. And my AVX has been very good when all its parameters come together.

Astroimaging is probably one of the most challenging things you can undertake. Your telescope is a very important part, and needs to be made with Astroimaging as its foundation. Typically found are Triple APO refractors. But other types can be worked with well. Newtonian's designed to astroimage with typically have the main mirror set forward to advance the focus to the cameras sensor, not an eyepiece.

Get your favorite beverage, then sit back and enjoy Forrest Tanaka's most excellent video's. I suggest you begin with his Optical Tube Assemblies (OTA), and his Mounts video's. Then, you need to learn about Guiding Your Telescope. I personally have a deep respect for YouTube video's due to being able to bookmark them, watching them straight forward, or backing them up to watch a part over, freeze frame, or to hold information while you set something from a video into a program. I did this with PHD2 to get my basic setting into a working order. Because Push Here Dummy (PHD) wasn't simple enough for this dummy. :wacko::wink:

I love going out and setting up, Aligning, Polar Aligning (Celestron's All Star Polar Alignment), checking my focus, then picking an Object (using Stellarium) to chase across the sky taking images of it. All from my backyard (Garden, where you are).

I am all about EAA. Electronically Assisted Astronomy. And using my computers to run things. Anything out there is now available to any of us willing and able to pursue it. (Weather permitting, of course.) Imaging those objects is particularly challenging. So be forewarned about being ready for frustrations and figuring it out. But if you like those sorts of things, you will enjoy the ride.

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Thanks for the advice Sonny. 

It seems like a minefield to me with regard to mounts etc. 

Was also looking at the Star Adventurer and a 66ED refractor for portability as my backyard views are hampered by buildings, trees and severe sodium light pollution.

My nearest darkish sky site is 20 minutes drive away  

I will get on YouTube as you recommend. 

Thanks for the advice. 

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It's hard to pick the mount, but the foundation for the entire experience.

One I have read good reviews on, and have some friends using is the iOptron brand. I don't know if they are available locally to you.

If I was starting out again, I think I would give them a good looking over.

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I love my AVX.. i use it with a sct,and shortly with a 80mm refractor.. as mentioned before the all star polar alignment and the align mount feature really does make things easier/quicker..

For astrophotography its great..but if your thinking of really long exposures no mount is going to be 100% accurate unless you guide.. the avx is capable but look at the weight carrying capabilities ,especially with a long ota as the pds.

With any newtonian if its not setup a fixed pier its going to need collimating everytime you setup..a refractor never needs self collimation and a sct every now and then but not often..do as much researching as you can..but your on the right path for the mount..

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I've got an AVX and C6n and I'm very happy with the mount, but the OTA required a better focuser. ASPA is a huge benefit for me, because my view north is completely obscured so I can't align on Polaris. I point the mount vaguely north, 2 star align, ASPA and then a quick drift align.

Optically the 150PDS and C6n are the same, but the focuser on the PDS is better. I've replaced the focuser on my C6n with one of these and I've not had any problems reaching focus (apparently the 150p non-DS doesn't have enough focus travel), but it wasn't a straightforward swap - I had to drill new mounting holes and enlarge the central hole so the drawtube would fit. I use a 450d and GSO/Revelation/Altair coma corrector but I wouldn't expect that to make much difference.

From the mount point of view, HEQ5 is slightly better than AVX but they're fairly comparable. Both are better than the EQ5, and for that reason I wouldn't recommend the 150PDS/EQ5 bundle.

http://www.astrobin.com/users/bagnaj97/ Those were all taken with my C6n on AVX.

 

All that said, I wouldn't recommend either of those bundles. I'd actually suggest getting the HEQ5 and 130PDS separately (unless you can find them bundled!). You'll end up with a better mount and the shorter focal length of the 130PDS is more forgiving of PA/guiding errors.

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Thanks guys. 

Somny, Tring Astro isn't too far from me so I may well take a trip down there when I have all the money in place. 

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The SW 150 PDS is a superb scope. I'd take the extra aperture over the 130 personally. It still remains a very manageable scope but with a useful increase in light gathering power. 

I've seen plenty through it from my pretty light polluted back garden. 

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