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Ger

Orion Nebula and Andromeda

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Having waited two weeks for clear skies I finally get them and used my new 6mm EP and even though I have already picked the Orion Nebula the 6mm made a lovely difference, got to see the stars in the trapezium. I turned to get andromeda using the GoTo but accidentally moved the scope, so after the success with Orion and picking out some easy stars with the GoTo I came in out of the cold.

in relation to andromeda what can I expect to when using my scope which is a star watcher Skyhawk 1145p, ( 500 mm ) with 25mm, 10mm, 6mm EP's with 2 x Barlow. Looking forward to getting back out again..... Just not tonight 

Edited by Ger
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Congratulations on viewing the Orion Nebula (Messier 42) !. It's worth using a low magnification on it as well so you can see the full extent of the nebulosity.

By Andromeda I assume you mean Messier 31, the Andromeda Galaxy, rather than the constellation Andromeda ?

Through a small or medium scope under a dark sky (no moonlight if at all possible) the galaxy appears as a large oval of misty light, brighter towards it's centre. It's a really large object (6x larger than the full moon at full extent !) so use your lowest magnification (the 25mm eyepiece). Right next to M31 is what looks like a fuzzy star - this is Messier 32, another galaxy. On the other side of M31 and a littl further away (but it can still be in the same field of view) is a small, much fainter oval patch which is a 3rd galaxy, Messier 110. The last one will be a challenge if the skies are not really dark but it can be seen with smaller scopes.

As you can see, low magnification is the way to go with the Andromeda Galaxy and companions !

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Thanks John, sorry I did mean to say m31. Thanks for the extra tips 

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Don't expect too much, if your observation site is not superb. You will probably see something like image the attachment here. I am a green observer too, but so far, my best observation of M31 was by handheld binoculars (you can imagine the shaky image). So far, my telescope fails to deliver better view of M31.
And btw, I just returned and today I spent most of the time observing trapezium too, it's beautiful. I was trying to see the E star, but I didn't see it today. Maybe next time.

m31-small.jpg

Edited by kilix
formatting

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I like that picture, gives a really good indication of what you're likely to see away from a really dark site - and if i'm not mistaken M32 is bottom centre :)

 

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3 hours ago, kilix said:

Don't expect too much, if your observation site is not superb. You will probably see something like image the attachment here. I am a green observer too, but so far, my best observation of M31 was by handheld binoculars (you can imagine the shaky image). So far, my telescope fails to deliver better view of M31.
And btw, I just returned and today I spent most of the time observing trapezium too, it's beautiful. I was trying to see the E star, but I didn't see it today. Maybe next time.

m31-small.jpg

So far I haven't managed to see M31 - I guess my goto isn't quite 100% aligned. Either that or it's beyond the equipment I have ATM.

I have managed to resolve the 4 galilean moons and the 4 stars of the trapezium!  (not too bad for a total newbee!)  I've even taken photos of them!!

But M31 still eludes me!

By the way can anyone tell me why the stars are triangular in shape?  Is this focus or camera shake?

 

Cheers MZ

M42T-0578.jpg

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I managed to find M31 using Heritage 100P, in moderately light polluted area. I'd say it's not down to equipment mate. Took me a while to find it and it's better to use lower mangification. It is also quite dim object and not that easy to spot if you don't know what it looks like ;). Be patient and keep trying, you'll find it :) .

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it took me ages to find it too, but that's because I didn't know what I was looking for - I can get it every time now even in the LP of Manchester, it really does look a fuzzy star rather than a fuzzy blob

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On 21. 1. 2017 at 03:59, ManixZero said:

So far I haven't managed to see M31 - I guess my goto isn't quite 100% aligned. Either that or it's beyond the equipment I have ATM.

I have managed to resolve the 4 galilean moons and the 4 stars of the trapezium!  (not too bad for a total newbee!)  I've even taken photos of them!!

But M31 still eludes me!

By the way can anyone tell me why the stars are triangular in shape?  Is this focus or camera shake?

 

Cheers MZ

M42T-0578.jpg

There is no way your current equipment is too weak to view M31.
As I said before, the best view of M31 I've ever had is through 10x50 binoculars. Really a 'WOW' moment.
Start with lowest magnification and look for something which looks like a bit of water vapor, which you are not sure if you see it, or you are only imagining it.

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M31 (Andromeda galaxy) is highly over-rated as a visual object (unless observed from a dark sky location....as are all galaxies). I used to live in Killiney (south county Dublin) which was about 20 miles south of Dublin city and about 2 miles inland from the coast. I could spot M31 with the naked eye. In my 8" scope from that location all i saw was a faint grey fuzzy cigar shaped object which was brighter towards the middle.

Its visible in most size aperture gear (i saw it with my 20x90 bins). It just depends on where you are as to how much detail you see. I have even imaged it with my Canon 450D camera on a tripod. It simply shows up as a smudge.

 

 

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
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On 21/01/2017 at 03:59, ManixZero said:

So far I haven't managed to see M31 - I guess my goto isn't quite 100% aligned. Either that or it's beyond the equipment I have ATM.

I have managed to resolve the 4 galilean moons and the 4 stars of the trapezium!  (not too bad for a total newbee!)  I've even taken photos of them!!

But M31 still eludes me!

By the way can anyone tell me why the stars are triangular in shape?  Is this focus or camera shake?

 

Cheers MZ

M42T-0578.jpg

Really chuffed as saw the same for the first time myself tonight; M42,43, trapezium, theta stars... really pleased used my 40mm and 25mm ep's with my Mak 127.... was a good result me think ;-) 

well done on getting such a great photo

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On 21/01/2017 at 02:59, ManixZero said:

So far I haven't managed to see M31 - I guess my goto isn't quite 100% aligned. Either that or it's beyond the equipment I have ATM.

I have managed to resolve the 4 galilean moons and the 4 stars of the trapezium!  (not too bad for a total newbee!)  I've even taken photos of them!!

But M31 still eludes me!

By the way can anyone tell me why the stars are triangular in shape?  Is this focus or camera shake?

 

Cheers MZ

M42T-0578.jpg

Triangular stars will be camera shake for sure, I got them too :) 

IMG_0368.PNG

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On 1/22/2017 at 23:29, LukeSkywatcher said:

M31 (Andromeda galaxy) is highly over-rated as a visual object (unless observed from a dark sky location....faint grey fuzzy.....

Same for me from my light polluted garden.

However! just on the edge of the city, M31 fills the view of my 70° EP.  Its hard to believe that something so large  is  really that hard to find, but then so many folk have less than perfect skies for their observations, but when you see it under the right conditions, I wouldn't  say its over rated,   more stunning than anything, and I  have  access to even darker sites when time and conditions allow, so for me, it can only get better, well, up to limit of my system  my eyes and the weather !

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We see so many images of M31 that the visual view is bound to seem a bit of an anti climax I reckon. However, viewing M31 is a sort of "3 for the price of 1" deal when you use low power under a reasonably dark sky because you can see another galaxy, M32, close alongside M31 and on the other side of it, and a little further off (but still in the same low power field of view), you get the fainter oval of M110. So thats 3 Messier objects you have notched up and the collective light of probably 500-600 billion stars that has travelled for over 2 million years to enter your scope and hit your retina. I think that is pretty impressive ! :grin:

 

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4 hours ago, John said:

We see so many images of M31 that the visual view is bound to seem a bit of an anti climax I reckon. However, viewing M31 is a sort of "3 for the price of 1" deal when you use low power under a reasonably dark sky because you can see another galaxy, M32, close alongside M31 and on the other side of it, and a little further off (but still in the same low power field of view), you get the fainter oval of M110. So thats 3 Messier objects you have notched up and the collective light of probably 500-600 billion stars that has travelled for over 2 million years to enter your scope and hit your retina. I think that is pretty impressive ! :grin:

 

......and the mad thing is that if you could "ride" one of those photons, you'd do the trip instantaneously!

Relativity blows your mind.

Doug.

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On 20/01/2017 at 22:28, Ger said:

Having waited two weeks for clear skies I finally get them and used my new 6mm EP and even though I have already picked the Orion Nebula the 6mm made a lovely difference, got to see the stars in the trapezium. I turned to get andromeda using the GoTo but accidentally moved the scope, so after the success with Orion and picking out some easy stars with the GoTo I came in out of the cold.

in relation to andromeda what can I expect to when using my scope which is a star watcher Skyhawk 1145p, ( 500 mm ) with 25mm, 10mm, 6mm EP's with 2 x Barlow. Looking forward to getting back out again..... Just not tonight 

Accidentally kicking the tripod is a right pain, but with GPS, re-aligning is now quick and easy, so it's not really that much of an issue.  Likewise relocating the whole set-up.

M31 is quite easy to see - GoTo or star-hopping get you in the right region, then with a bit of time at the EP, perhaps also using averted vision, up it pops.  As others say, it is usually only a fuzzy patch, i.e. the core of the galaxy, and not its full extent by any means, but just thinking about what that patch is makes it worthwhile!

Doug.

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6 hours ago, cloudsweeper said:

Accidentally kicking the tripod is a right pain,

I bet it's not ;-)  but kick my Dob's stand and I think you'd need to ice your foot for the next 2 hours!! 

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36 minutes ago, JOC said:

I bet it's not ;-)  but kick my Dob's stand and I think you'd need to ice your foot for the next 2 hours!! 

:grin:

I stand corrected - Accidentally kicking the tripod is a right inconvenience  !

Doug.

 

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I've just been out tonight and think I've managed to get the trapezium. Used my phone over the eyepiece. 200p dob and 32mm plos

20170205_211443.jpg

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11 minutes ago, Drunk Coler said:

I've just been out tonight and think I've managed to get the trapezium. Used my phone over the eyepiece. 200p dob and 32mm plos

20170205_211443.jpg

It's not split, but you can see the Trapezium, well done! More power and you will get the four stars separated.

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Ive Gotta keep reading and maybe put a webcam in instead of trying to hold phone in place.

Edited by Drunk Coler

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I've noticed a couple of webcams for sale that are circa £50 and cylindrical; I know there are specific cameras available for the job but I wonder if anyone has found a good webcam that is suitable size to use easily?

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16 hours ago, Aikidoamigo said:

I've noticed a couple of webcams for sale that are circa £50 and cylindrical; I know there are specific cameras available for the job but I wonder if anyone has found a good webcam that is suitable size to use easily?

I've modified a Microsoft lifecam but have yet to use it. I know a few other people online have also done it by using either an eyepiece extender or a 35mm film tube and removing the ir filter if there is one and then cutting out the first small rectangle close to the camera.

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