Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_beauty_night_skies.thumb.jpg.2711ade15e31d01524e7dc52d15c4217.jpg

cloudsweeper

Earth's Very Own Co-orbital Asteroid

Recommended Posts

I knew that asteroids were not confined to a belt between Mars and Jupiter, but only recently learned that Jupiter has two large groups of asteroids which are co-orbital with it, following its orbit at about 60 degrees either side of the planet.  They are called Trojans and Greeks, and cluster about the so-called Lagrangian Points.  Not only that, but there is another group of Jovian asteroids called Hildas - yes, Hildas - which form an equilateral triangle with the Trojans and Greeks at two of its apexes.  

Now what I didn't know until yesterday is that other planets also have a few Trojans, in particular Earth, whose Trojan is called 2010 TK.

I apologise if you good folk already know about this and I've been a bit slow to catch up!

Source? - the excellent book Calculating The Cosmos, by Prof. Ian Stewart, first published 2016.  Highly recommended.

Doug.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thing not often mentioned is that as well the bright moons we can see in a scope Jupiter has over 60 moons.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Davey-T said:

Another thing not often mentioned is that as well the bright moons we can see in a scope Jupiter has over 60 moons.

Dave

It had nine (known ones) when I was a lad!

Present figure is apparently 67, with Saturn close behind with 62 as well as hundreds of moonlets.

Doug.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Davey-T said:

Another thing not often mentioned is that as well the bright moons we can see in a scope Jupiter has over 60 moons.

Dave

And rings too although they are pretty hard to see from here,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, D4N said:

And rings too although they are pretty hard to see from here,

.....and Uranus and Neptune also have faint ring systems.  

All these wonders in our own cosmic back yard!

Doug.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cloudsweeper said:

 and cluster about the so-called Lagrangian Points. 

, in particular Earth,

and when you have finished that book :)  you can go on to investigate Earth's Lagrangian points which are much used by space science, for example SOHO monitoring the sun is at one such point.

Isnt science facinating !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am always blown away by the fact that the planets do not circle the sun on a flat plane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A video by Scott Manley. See the explanation that comes with it on YouTube.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, cloudsweeper said:

I knew that asteroids were not confined to a belt between Mars and Jupiter, but only recently learned that Jupiter has two large groups of asteroids which are co-orbital with it, following its orbit at about 60 degrees either side of the planet.  They are called Trojans and Greeks, and cluster about the so-called Lagrangian Points.  Not only that, but there is another group of Jovian asteroids called Hildas - yes, Hildas - which form an equilateral triangle with the Trojans and Greeks at two of its apexes.  

Now what I didn't know until yesterday is that other planets also have a few Trojans, in particular Earth, whose Trojan is called 2010 TK.

I apologise if you good folk already know about this and I've been a bit slow to catch up!

Source? - the excellent book Calculating The Cosmos, by Prof. Ian Stewart, first published 2016.  Highly recommended.

Doug.

 

Hi Doug.

Slight correction:

2010 TK is an Apollo type near-Earth asteroid.

2010 TK7 is an Aten type near-Earth asteroid, and Earth trojan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Guy Wells said:

Hi Doug.

Slight correction:

2010 TK is an Apollo type near-Earth asteroid.

2010 TK7 is an Aten type near-Earth asteroid, and Earth trojan

Thanks Guy - now I check, there is a faint subscript which I took to be a citation indicator, but Yes, it does actually read 2010 TK7.

Doug.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Matters little if you post information others might already know of Doug,  the forum is getting new members 
at a rate of knots, and ongoing, so  Jupiter's entourage  will still surprise many  newbies.
It's all good stuff, there is loads of Info about  the  Solar System  population  many are  unaware of,
 so keep these snippets coming in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't keep count of all these moons...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.