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PESKYWAABBIT

Astronomy Clubs in Suffolk, nearer to Bury St Edmunds than Ipswich?

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Hi there guys in Sunny Suffolk,

I've been into astronomy for a few years here and there. Recently though wanting to get more into the hobby and upgraded my kit.

Currently based in Bardwell. I'm on the look out for a Star Gazing club in the Bury area if somebody knows of one. I currently commute to Cambridge and back for work (80 miles each day, can be like 3-4 hours in total due to the dismal traffic system in Cambridge.) At the end of the day I don't really fancy loading my gear up to do another 60 miles to Ipswich and back to visit the astronomy clubs there so I'm in need of help.

I see there is clubs in Ely, however I would rather not leave all of my kit sitting in my car in the city centre unattended whilst I'm working for 6 hours if you understand.

Do you guys know of some awesome people based closer to Bury that collect together some nights? Would like to meet some of you guys for a session of star gazing and learning.

Thanks,

Tom

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There is the IoA in Cambridge, Madingly Rd, that hold weekly Wednesday talks+. Then if clear they appear to go outside for a presentation by the CAA. It is not a club however - would suggest that you make the effort to visit on a Wednesday and see what happens, from memory get there by 7:00 to get a seat. If you pick a clear Wednesday then you would also get to see what occurs afterwards at the presentation.

As it is not a club it is different.

The CAA meet at the same place on a Friday, once a month but no observing as such. So not I guess what you want.

As you have said there is Ely and there is (or was) Papworth. Guess St Neots, if they still run, is too far.

Looking at the map you may be better to try Attleborough: BSE > Thetford > Attleborough. Just North of Attleborough is Gt Ellingham and here is a fairly large club there with an observatory. It is on the Norh edge of the place at the cricket ground (on the right going through the place). The drive seems easy, and looks like 20-25 mile each way. Thinking that as they are, or seem, reasonably large they could meet on several evenings for observing. Giving you a better selection of oppurtunities.

http://www.brecklandastro.org.uk/

Not sure there is anything at Diss, half a memory of one.

I suggest visiting the IoA say this Wednesday, looks like it might actually be clear, but cold. However I suspect that the Breckland club will be a better option.

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Literally by chance I just found there is an astronomy club called the 'The Athenaeum Astronomy Association' located in central Bury St Edmunds.

It seems they keep themselves to themselves! I may have to check this out :) It seems they are trying to raise funds to restore the Victorian observatory dome for public use. It seems they meet at Nowton park fortnightly on thursdays!

http://www.3a.org.uk/index.htm

 

15492448_718135028339281_8138374054404242945_n.jpg.3879d43099bcbc315715d94aab73a55a.jpg

Edited by PESKYWAABBIT
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Looks an interesting group, and when it is cloudy you can work on the observatory - which looks a great building to get back into work order.

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Hi Tom,  I too have just discovered the AAA in Bury by pure chance ! They are a very new club. I went along for the first time on Thursday evening, it was a bit chaotic as they were locked out of their usual building, lovely people and we were made very welcome. About 20 people present, all ages . They are running their first star party tonight for 60 guests , unfortunately it's tipping it down in Suffolk today! Hopefully meet you in Nowton park soon then! I think it's wonderful news that they want to restore the old Athaneum observatory .

Ruth ( I'm from nr Diss, took a friend with me from Sapiston! ) 

Edited by Tigaroo

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On 17 March 2017 at 22:17, PESKYWAABBIT said:

Literally by chance I just found there is an astronomy club called the 'The Athenaeum Astronomy Association' located in central Bury St Edmunds.

It seems they keep themselves to themselves! I may have to check this out :) It seems they are trying to raise funds to restore the Victorian observatory dome for public use. It seems they meet at Nowton park fortnightly on thursdays!

http://www.3a.org.uk/index.htm

 

15492448_718135028339281_8138374054404242945_n.jpg.3879d43099bcbc315715d94aab73a55a.jpg

If you drop the secretary Marian an email you will receive a quick and friendly response ??

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20 hours ago, Tigaroo said:

Hi Tom,  I too have just discovered the AAA in Bury by pure chance ! They are a very new club.

I know right! I found them by seeing their Nowton park event on Facebook appearing nearby but it seemed to have been fully booked :( I was looking up at the stars last night and noticing the weather actually stayed okay and I could see some stars peeping through so I hope the guests had a great time! 

I'm glad we were able to find a club nearby to help us learn :) I'm from Bardwell, it's nearer to Thetford than it is Bury I guess but I hope to see you at Nowton park too someday soon then!

Hopefully the discovery of the club and posting it on here may bring some more locals in from Suffolk to the AAA. :) 

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Their next meeting at Nowton Park walled garden is on Thursday week , I hope to be there then! Yep, I missed out on tickets for the star party too, I was told about it and the club at Sneezum's in Bury, they were promoting it as they sell telescopes in there. There were four newcomers last week so guess word is getting around ! It's a bit of a hike for me from Diss but I do travel to Bury often. 

Hoping to learn some new stuff too, and enjoy swapping information ....and basically natter with like-minded passionate people as I'm a bit of a lone wolf in my family when it comes to enjoying the night skies!  ?

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We have a mutual friend on social media, a lad I know very well! Small world ?

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1 minute ago, Tigaroo said:

We have a mutual friend on social media, a lad I know very well! Small world

Hehe feel free to add me if you like! 

I've sent Marian an email and I'm organising a drink and a chat with them at some point to learn some history about the club. I've also been asked to come on the 30th for the Nowton Park meetup, so hopefully should see you there if you're attending!

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That's progress! Said you would get a prompt reply, there's a couple of lads, bit younger than you but very keen ! Ah, just realised I'm away in York next week so won't be there, make my apologies  ... hope you get on okay and hopefully see you there next month ! 

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On 1/14/2017 at 10:23, SW130p said:

This one in Ipswich http://www.oasi.org.uk/  great location and activity's. Has a full working  258 mm Tomline Refractor, dating from 1874.

I'm a member there, the big refractor is really beautiful though more and more folks from the club meet at Newbourne village hall. Access to the Orwell site where the Tomlin frac is can be pretty tricky as it's a private school so there are understandably a few security measures to bypass. 

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Again, like the others, I found this club by accident. It just happened to pop up on a re-tweet on Twitter. 

So, I went visiting the Athenaeum club at Nowton Park  last Thursday, 18/01/2018. I was made very welcome and soon learned that they cover all aspects of astronomy, including unaided night sky viewing, binocular,  telescope and astro photography. 

I shall visit again on Thursday 1st Feb and sign on the dotted line. This beats my lone astro endeavours into a cocked hat. 

Thanks to club members for their welcome.

Kevin

 

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On 20 January 2018 at 19:17, Bosuser said:

 

I shall visit again on Thursday 1st Feb and sign on the dotted line. This beats my lone astro endeavours into a cocked hat. 

 

Look forward to meeting you there soon Kevin! I wasn't able to go this week but should be there next time ?

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