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Canter_Zac13

What is Jupiter like right now?

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I want to see Jupiter through my new telescope but it isn't visible where I live until 1 A.M. I don't want to get up and go out there and look at Jupiter and not see the red spots or any moons. Does anyone know what it is like? Thanks?

 

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You'll always be able to see moons - how many depends on where they are located. And you should also be able to see a couple of weather bands. try this software: http://www.astrosurf.com/rondi/jupiter/# it'll show you which moons are where and where the GRS is.

Oh, and if you hang of for a few more weeks, Jupiter will be up before bedtime :)

 

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Jupiter rotates very quickly, so to be sure that the GRS is visible you will have to use one of the apps mentioned above. You will always be able to see some of the 4 largest Moons. To identify them again you use an app.

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Hi it doesn't rise here (in clouded out Lincolnshire) quite as early as that but this is sky safari screenshot of what you could expect to see at 02.00hr (assuming perfect conditions, Hubble on hire etc  :bino2: )

 

IMG_0032.PNG

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If you have an Apple iPhone, iPod, iPad download Jupiter Moons & sister app Saturn Moons too.

Both apps are not available on Android devices.

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33 minutes ago, Hadron said:

Hi it doesn't rise here (in clouded out Lincolnshire) quite as early as that but this is sky safari screenshot of what you could expect to see at 02.00hr (assuming perfect conditions, Hubble on hire etc  :bino2: )

 

IMG_0032.PNG

Thats a good likeness of how Jupiter appears with my 12" dobsonian at around 250x :smiley:

Edited by John
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I have a 8" Dobsonian and my highest magnification right now is 240X, so it looks like I'm going to get to see Jupiter very well.

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6 hours ago, Canter_Zac13 said:

I have a 8" Dobsonian and my highest magnification right now is 240X, so it looks like I'm going to get to see Jupiter very well.

There is a fair difference between the light gathering power of a 12" compared to an 8". At 240x magnification you might be disappointed unless seeing conditions are perfect. I have an 8mm Delos (254x in my scope) and a 12mm Delos (169x) . The lesser powered EP generally reveals more surface detail of Jupiter than the 8mm despite its lower magnification.  A filter can also tease out a bit more. My views are similar to those depicted, but at the medium (169x) magnification. Seeing conditions are critical and with the morning Jupiter being fairly low you are currently peering through optimum atmospheric soup even on a clear morning. Light pollution is also an enemy of higher magnification. 

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46 minutes ago, noah4x4 said:

At 240x magnification you might be disappointed unless seeing conditions are perfect. I have an 8mm Delos (254x in my scope) and a 12mm Delos (169x) . The lesser powered EP generally reveals more surface detail of Jupiter than the 8mm despite its lower magnification.  

Totally agree!  I was looking at many features of the disc with plenty of clarity the other morning at only x96 in a 4" frac.  It looked steady & crisp. I had no desire to go up the magnification.  

Mostly less is more, unless the conditions allow more & then more is more, but mostly not for long. 

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If you want to see it at its best then I'm afraid you are going to have to either get up in the early hours or be patient for a bit more!! Ideally you want to view it when it is as high in the sky as possible so you are looking through less atmosphere. If you try and view when low on the horizon then I'm afraid you might be disappointed.

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8 hours ago, Canter_Zac13 said:

I have a 8" Dobsonian and my highest magnification right now is 240X, so it looks like I'm going to get to see Jupiter very well.

As has been said, you will see a sharper image and more detail (with study) at a lower magnification unless the seeing conditions are really excellent - eg: 150x - 180x. Jupiter does not respond as well as, say, Saturn, to really high magnifications.

A slightly smaller but crisper image is more desireable than a larger blurred one, IMHO.

Also, seeing detail on the disk beyond the two main equatorial belts can take time. You need to study the planet carefully for 30 minutes or more. As your eye adapts more detail seems to slowly emerge often popping in and out of view. You get momentary glimpses of fine detail and you need time at the eyepiece to catch these. Even the much vaunted Great Red Spot does not always jump out at you even if it is on "your" side of the disk when you are observing. "The more you look, the more you will see" :smiley:

Edited by John
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I use my UHC filter sometimes this brings the bands out really sharp when seeing is not as good. 

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19 minutes ago, wookie1965 said:

I use my UHC filter sometimes this brings the bands out really sharp when seeing is not as good. 

I don't have a uhc filter (yet) but i tend to find that a blue filter creates some great contrast between the colours of the bands.

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