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specs wearer prob....


petermartin5
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Hope Ive used the right forum. I suffer from astigmatism and wear specs, cant see a damn thing without them. I have a real problem using the more powerful eps ( refractor) as the aperature is so small. Find it very difficult to get a good viewing position if you know what I mean.

Does anyone else have this problem and is there anything I can do to help resolve this.

Thanks, Pete

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I wear specs but I now spend most of my time in contact lenses, all I can say is, its unbelievably easier to use contacts than glasses, before I had to take my glasses off when I wanted to look through an ep, then I would drop them and stuff, contacts make it so much easier, and they're pretty cheap these days. I use a monthly disposable one, they send me 3 months worth of lenses and cleaning solution at a time and every three months I get a parcel through the post. Jobs a good 'un :lol:

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I think an astigmatism prevents the use of contacts though...

I *think* Pete, you need the longer eye relief type EP's. I wear specs myself but am lucky enough not suffer the same way you do. Any of the main dealers will be able to supply and advise

HTH

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I don't wear glasses (so please excuse my ignorance), is it not a case of removing your glasses and focusing for your eyes - might mean a big refocus each time if observing with someone else.

Would that work?

Ant

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Instead of using the shorter eps, you can use a longer ep and a quality Barlow. This gives you the magnification, while retaining the AFOV and eye relief of the longer ep. When I used to wear glasses (I've had my lenses replaced due to cataracts) I used to just focus for my eyesight, and it worked fine, without glasses.

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Ant

>quote<

People who have astigmatism may also use prescription glasses or contact lenses to correct their vision. In some cases, astigmatism can be corrected by medical procedure which reshapes the cornea - but it may develop again over time too. Unless the astigmatism is introduced only at the extreme edge of the cornea, and is not a problem when using telescopes with small diameter exit pupils, then they have been condemned to use glasses (or weighted contact lenses) when observing with a telescope.

>/quote<

Tele-Vue do a Dioptric lens which attaches to many of their EP's which allows correction for this, Pete. Others may do something similar.

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You can Daz, I have a Toric lens in my right eye because its got astigmatism, my left eye is but not bad enough to need a toric lens so I have an aspherical lens in that eye.

Cool! Things have moved on a-pace since I had mine!

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Not specific to astigmatism but...

Generally, for comfortable viewing then you need:

Extra focal length – to obtain magnification without resorting to short-focal length-eyepieces with short eye-relief.

More aperture – for a larger exit-pupil.

Hope that helps,

Steve :lol:

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Steve,

What is astigmatism where observing is concerned? I'm slightly astigmatic in my right eye, I've asked my optician how this will affect my astronomy but he just gives me the "rugby ball, football" spiel.

What are the actual effects at the eyepiece? My left eye is fine but I'm very right sided and find it difficult doing anything on my left side.

Gaz

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What is astigmatism where observing is concerned?

What are the actual effects at the eyepiece?

In truth..... :lol:

Like you, I only know the standard opticians explanation.

I don't think my optician is any more clued up than me or you mate!! I can see what astigmatism does in a mirror or lens, I'd just like to know whether it's worth trying to use my left eye to observe.

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Thanks to all of you who took time to reply, the people on this forum are terrific.With astigmatism you cant take your specs off to use ( focus) the scope. I think that the suggestion of using a barlow could well help as , I understand, you keep the fov for the " original" ep.

Need now to look around for a Barlow when funds ( and the wife!) permit.

Thanks once again, all advice greatly appreciated. Cant praise this site highly enough, youre a great bunch out there.

Pete

PS. As a novice I admit to being surprised as to how small ep aperatures are.!

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I started wearing monthly disposable soft toric lenses recently, and I'm amazed by how good they are. My telescope is so much easier to use with them. And, just looking up at the sky, I can see much fainter stars through my contact lenses than I could ever see through my glasses. They are brilliant for astronomy.

Contact lens technology really is improving. I first tried contact lenses in 1989, when the only ones you could get for astigmatism were rigid gas permeable lenses. I gave up after a while because they were so uncomfortable. But these new toric soft lenses are great. It amazes me that a soft lens can rotate itself to the correct orientation within the eye just becaue of the way it's weighted - it's only a bendy, flimsy little thing. But it really does work.

I pay £15 a month for mine from Specsavers. They gave me a free consultation, fitting and trial pair of lenses to start with, so it costs nothing to give them a try.

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