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Filters: Baader or Astrodon? LRGB and NB


astrocatinfo
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Good morning,

I'm close to purchase the ASI1600 with the filter wheel and OAG. I have a couple of questions about the filters:

 

Is it worth to go for the Baader LRGB? Or can I go for the ZWO ones (maybe are Optlong?). Some bad reports on the L filter on the later.

For narrow band I was thinking on the Astrodons: 5nm Halpha, 3nm OIII and SII. I don't want to go for the 3nm Halpha and the same NII... not high polluted area, less filters. Am I right? Always looking for a balance price-caracteristics.

 

About the size, 31mm unmounted.

 

Thanks so much for your help,

 

Aleix

 

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If you want to save money and you don't have much LP then 5nm [OIII] and [SII]. get a 3nm HII for now and add a [NII] later. If you buy a 5nm HII and then decide you *would* like to try [NII] as well, you'd have to get a 3nm HII after all.

Of course, if you have no intention of ever exploring [NII], and your LP isn't bad then 5nm for all filters makes sense (At least to me).

Just a thought, 3nm [OIII] would be a bit more resistant to moonlight, which is LP to an astrophotographer.

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4 hours ago, DaveS said:

If you want to save money and you don't have much LP then 5nm [OIII] and [SII]. get a 3nm HII for now and add a [NII] later. If you buy a 5nm HII and then decide you *would* like to try [NII] as well, you'd have to get a 3nm HII after all.

Of course, if you have no intention of ever exploring [NII], and your LP isn't bad then 5nm for all filters makes sense (At least to me).

Just a thought, 3nm [OIII] would be a bit more resistant to moonlight, which is LP to an astrophotographer.

That's why I was considering 3nm OIII. Because of the moon effects... is it the same with SII? Worth going to 3nm?

How good or bad would be to stay only with Halpha 3nm? Which deep sky objects have important signal in the NII band?

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The further towards the blue the worse the moon will affect your images, so H N & S will be less affected.

As for suitable targets for N part of the fun is looking for them. The Rosette is s good target as is M27 and possibly other planetary nebulae. Might be worth looking at other pure emission nebulae.

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I'm not sure that I'd use an OIII in the moon. I've never found them terribly moon proof. I have both the Baader 7nm and the Astrodon 3 in Ha. The Astrodon is vastly more moon proof and gives tiny stars, which is great either for combining with LRGB, where they don't affect the star colour, or for standalone narrowband images where tiny stars are just nice of themselves. I've never tried the AD 5 Ha which admits the N11 line. We went for the 3 because of its higher contrast which is good for adding to natural colour images.

If I shoot Baader 7nm in the TEC 140 at 1015mm FL the detail is comparable with that of the 3nm AD shot in the Tak 106 at 530mm. In any other comparison the Tec massively out resolves the Taks, so the Astrodon is in another league. It is also incredibly easy to process.

Olly

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I started with Astrodon 5nm Ha, 3nm OIII and 5nm SII.  More recently I've bought 3nm Ha and found it much better for tighter stars and keeping a full moon at bay :)  To match I bought the 3nm SII (already having 3nm OIII).  Now it seems I could do with NII.

Fortunately, the ASI1600MM-Cool works fine with the cheapest Astrodon size of 1.25" mounted filters and the ZWO EFW mini with negligible vignetting.  But the diminishing value of the pound has forced the price up to nearly half a grand :(  I think I should have bought the 3nm NII filter instead of the SII.

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Agree with Olly that [OIII] isn't very moon-proof, but up here we have to take any clear night on offer, and sometimes that might mean getting [OIII] data with some moon (No more than half moon, and 90deg or so away), so the narrower the bandwidth the better.

Regarding [SII] vs [NII] I've found [NII] to be more use, often with a stronger signal. But that's just my personal experience, YMMV as they say.

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Just for the fun of it here is an image of M42 from a couple of years ago in the "forbidden" lines of [SII], [NII], and [OIII], mapping sulphur to red, nitrogen to green and oxygen to blue, I think there was an hour of each in 10 min subs. To reiterate, there's no hydrogen in this image.

In my defence, and because I know it's a pretty poor image, I *was* still learning the art and craft of NB imaging.

Forbidden M42.jpg

If we ever get another clear night this winter I may revisit M42 (Visiting it with fire and sword :evil4:)

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