Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_30_second_exp_2_winners.thumb.jpg.b5430b40547c40d344fd4493776ab99f.jpg

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I hijacked a post from this thread: 

 

How Olly and I did it.

-Setup Mesu, make sure it's level

-Look through finder and put polaris at 2/3 off center

-Guide without dec corrections for 5 minutes in East, adlust altitude, recheck ...

-Guide without dec corrections for 5 minutes close to meridian adjust Azimuth, recheck ...

We take 30 minute subs since then without any rotation ...

I've done this 2 times and it never took more than 20 minutes in total (actually last time I spent less then 10 minutes, must have been lucky with the finder scope), easiest mount to polar align ... and that with 50 KG of total weight.

The adjustment screws are just stellar.

/Yves

How are you guiding without dec corrections? Is this under algorithms in PHD2? I know you use the Argo Navis controller and the SiTech has a freeze declination function.

I'm trying to PA the Mesu and haven't had much luck with the Polemaster. I had the routine with the Polemaster spot on with it's PA procedure and it was off by 7 arcminutes in PHD2's drift alignment. I'm going to use your procedure without the Dec corrections to see if I can get better results. I did get a better alignment with the drift align in PHD2 and the guiding assistant didn't recommend any PA corrections but my guide graph was horrible.

Thanks.

Mike

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/12/2016 at 11:14, Mcrogers1 said:

Hello,

I hijacked a post from this thread: 

 

How are you guiding without dec corrections? Is this under algorithms in PHD2? I know you use the Argo Navis controller and the SiTech has a freeze declination function.

I'm trying to PA the Mesu and haven't had much luck with the Polemaster. I had the routine with the Polemaster spot on with it's PA procedure and it was off by 7 arcminutes in PHD2's drift alignment. I'm going to use your procedure without the Dec corrections to see if I can get better results. I did get a better alignment with the drift align in PHD2 and the guiding assistant didn't recommend any PA corrections but my guide graph was horrible.

Thanks.

Mike

 

  •  

My recollection of doing this with Yves is that we simply tracked  without guiding and watched the drift. These are the notes I use when re-doing a drift alignment.

Cameras set orthogonal to RA and Dec.

Choose southern star at meridian/celestial equator intersection. (+/- half hour, +/-  5 degrees)

Determine west. (Stars drift west without motor running.) Determine N using light peeping over the N side of the objective.

Run motors and ignore any E-W drifting.

Star drifts SOUTH, move mount WEST.

Star drifts NORTH, move mount EAST.

Choose Eastern Star at 20 degree elevation.

Star drifts SOUTH, RAISE the mount.

Star drifts NORTH, LOWER the mount.

Repeat.

I hope that's not too cryptic!

Olly

 

Edited by ollypenrice
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, ollypenrice said:

My recollection of doing this with Yves is that we simply tracked  without guiding and watched the drift. These are the notes I use when re-doing a drift alignment.

Cameras set orthogonal to RA and Dec.

Choose southern star at meridian/celestial equator intersection. (+/- half hour, +/-  5 degrees)

Determine west. (Stars drift west without motor running.) Determine N using light peeping over the N side of the objective.

Run motors and ignore any E-W drifting.

Star drifts SOUTH, move mount WEST.

Star drifts NORTH, move mount EAST.

Choose Eastern Star at 20 degree elevation.

Star drifts SOUTH, RAISE the mount.

Star drifts NORTH, LOWER the mount.

Repeat.

I hope that's not too cryptic!

Olly

 

That's basically drift aligning, isn't it, except that you have the tracking enabled. The only issue that I could see with this is that your mount needs to be tracking at the correct Sidereal rate. My Mesu's tracking rate drifted over 12 months to where it wasn't tracking at sidereal. That would throw a spanner in the works if you tried the above, wouldn't it? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Zakalwe said:

That's basically drift aligning, isn't it, except that you have the tracking enabled. The only issue that I could see with this is that your mount needs to be tracking at the correct Sidereal rate. My Mesu's tracking rate drifted over 12 months to where it wasn't tracking at sidereal. That would throw a spanner in the works if you tried the above, wouldn't it? 

 

It is indeed drift alignment in its classic form, I'd have said. I guess that it's predicated upon reasonable sidereal tracking, yes. It doesn't need to be perfect, though, since periodic error can be ignored.

Odd that your tracking rate changed. Do you know what caused it?

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ollypenrice said:

It is indeed drift alignment in its classic form, I'd have said. I guess that it's predicated upon reasonable sidereal tracking, yes. It doesn't need to be perfect, though, since periodic error can be ignored.

Odd that your tracking rate changed. Do you know what caused it?

Olly

Nope...Ive being trying to diagnose it's issues for a while now. Ive got it tracking correctly now and have a custom firmware installed to try and diagnose some other problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what I'm doing I have to admit. I must be the most incompetent polar aligner to ever live. I ran guiding assistant for over 5 minutes and I had an average PA error of .7 arc min but the graph was horrible. I guess I'll do another iteration when the weather clears (I've been at this for 5 hours and its 0330 time to turn in.) I don't if the ScpLat in SiTechExe has any influence on this but mine shows 90 and I'm at 35N. I have ServoConfi and SiTechExe lat parameters set right (never mind on the ScpLat. I guess that's for equatorial). 

 

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all!

Guid Asst.jpg

Edited by Mcrogers1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bit late, now a days in PHD2 I just use the drift alignment tool, it will tell you where to slew, it then starts guiding and will show you how much off you are ...

I typically first try to figure out which direction I need to make corrections for the error to get smaller and then iterate till the error is acceptable ...

Beter explanation found here;

https://sites.google.com/site/openphdguiding/phd2-drift-alignment

 

/Yves

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a drift align in PHD2 and had under 1 arc min error in alt and az positions that it has you slew the scope to but the guide graph was really bad. I'm going to let it drift for 15 minutes next time once I have a low enough error.

Stars at the edge were elongated after a 5 min guided image. I would think if your polar alignment is stating you're under 1 arc min then your graph should be good and a 5 minute exposure should be easy. I'm really new at this and don't know enough to be an effective troubleshooter. Could seeing or roundness of your stars cause this type of problem. I thought if your total RMS was under 1 then you are good.

I'll get it dialed in eventually when the weather cooperates. I know I'm doing something wrong because this mount is a solid performer.

I use the bookmark method for drift aligning: http://www.cloudynights.com/topic/472874-drift-alignment-with-phd2-the-bookmark-technique/?hl=+phd +drift +bookmark.

I know with the scopes on the Mesu the altitude adjustment is hard. The azimuth I have to be off of where I need the adjustment to be so when I tighten the tommy nut it is correct. I like the adjusment on this mount a lot better than the CGEM.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm waiting on an email from Lucas. I do have my RA/Dec set to polite mode and a supervisory threshold of 10.

The mount starts moving at a high rate constantly during guiding now once every 30 minutes and I have to shutdown and restart to get it back to tracking at a sidereal rate. 

Edited by Mcrogers1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been following that thread.

Going to try resyncing the clock in the offset tracking window. I have an atomic clock set to sync my computer on an hourly basis now.

Lucas needs me to try tracking without guiding to see what happens. Hopefully the weather clears to do some testing.  Maybe the new SiTech coming out will help sort things out.

Comparing my guide log to Sara's I did notice that I have backlash compensation enabled. I turned that off just now. Maybe it will help.

Edited by Mcrogers1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just an update with the latest problem. The dec axis will only move a bit in one direction then starts moving back the other way with me holding the same key. Then all of a sudden it will work.

I keep getting below horizon limit in SiTech.exe but don't use a horizon file and the scope is pointed at the coordinates for azimuth drift aligning in PHD2. I searched for "horizon limit" in the SiTech user manual and those two words together aren't in there.

The tracking keeps stopping and I can't restart it without cycling power to the mount. Pressing start in SiTech does nothing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless you have changed the configuration,  the way to start tracking is to issue an  Offset Init.

Have you got a copy of Steve Richards excellent excellent starter excellent starter guide?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can get it tracking with an offset init but then it stops tracking and I can't use the start button to get tracking back. I have to restart it after that. 

I used Steve Richards guide thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I doubt if you'll be able to get your polar alignment much better than 0.7.  It is odd that you start tracking only for it to stop again.  My mount will only stop tracking if it hits its meridian limit (set in Sitech).  I use SGP for imaging and always get this to do a flip before the meridian limit is reached.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just looked at your PHD screenshot.  The main window (the one that shows the stars) did not llok correct.  The 'star' that has the box around it looks ver cigar-shaped to me, as do the few other points of light visible.  Are you certain that your guide camera is focussed and orthogonal?  Also what were the sky conditions like when you shot this?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get seagull and banana shaped guidestars with my OAG but it doesn't seem to bother PHD.

Dave

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Davey-T said:

I get seagull and banana shaped guidestars with my OAG but it doesn't seem to bother PHD.

Dave

I'm with Dave on this..... I rarely have round stars in my OAG and PHD seems pretty happy with the situation...... now if only the same could be said of this blasted Mesu..... :( 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair enough.  I am struggling to see how a 0.7 arcminute polar alignment could give that graph.  

I don't really understand the interaction between the skymodel that you build and guiding.  Could that be a factor?

Edited by gnomus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always used to have seagull shaped stars in my OAG guide star images but to my amusement, the stupendously flat field of my Esprit 150ED means that my OAG stars are now perfectly formed despite being (as the name implies) off axis! However, I can confirm that distorted guide stars are not an issue anyway.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had 'snowflake' shaped stars in a finder guider the other day. I don't know why, but it didn't appear to affect the guiding that I could see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By antariksha
      Abstract :
      The topic of Polar Alignment is not at all new. Lot of approaches, automation tools are available. Yet, some aspects in all the current approaches drove me towards doing some more work. The key aspects of this approach are as follows.
      Ability to do the Polar alignment without polaris sited Relatively less complexity than drift alignment Ability to address to a good extent the atmospheric refraction to finally locate correct NCP / SCP position A good starting point for amateurs who wish to graduate towards sophisticated tools and techniques Ability to quickly verify if the polar alignment is intact after one object photographed or viewed, and the equipment is being pointed to another object. This point is mentioned in light of the fact that sometimes the polar alignment gets disturbed and the next object photographed shows star trails. This is especially true if payload is tweaked for next photo imaging. What is required?
      One should have a good understanding of the sky and ability to identify stars upto Mag 4.5 using star maps and basic concepts of RA and Dec. One should have Equatorial mount with ability to fine tune Azimuth and Alt adjustments. Availability of cross hair eye piece for the ability to locate the star exactly at the cross hair point. It is good to have finder scope attached and the finder cross hair is aligned with the main telescope eye piece cross hair. Please note this technique is not for the GoTo mounts which many times have Alt-Az mounts fitted with tracking motors. The GoTo alignment is done using 3 Star method.
      However, there are a few mounts which are equatorial design and also have GoTo tracking capabilities with RA and Dec motors. For these mounts, it is preferred to carry out polar alignment. The only point about these mounts, is that GoTo should have ability to start the RA motor ( tracking) without doing the 3 Star alignment, in other words, bypassing the steps for 3 Star alignment.
      The technique is based on the mathematics around the stellar current positions precisely computed. The technique suggests NCP or SCP alignment using specific pointing stars.
      Method
      The technique relies upon pairs of stars identified such that pair has same RA or same Dec. The details about finding such pairs, are given in the next section ( Mathematics).
      Step 1
      Try to do a very coarse polar alignment using your latitude and pointing the equatorial axis approximately towards a possible Polaris direction. This is only to reduce the iterations in the method below. There is no dependency to visually site Polaris. Step 2
      Select the pair of stars of the same RA from the table 1 below. Now, while choosing the pair, please select that pair which is closest to the zenith. This will reduce the error due to atmospheric refraction of siting those stars. Choosing such pair, will get better alignment. Note that the NCP and SCP lie on the same RA contour of the pair, you have just chosen. Locate the first star of the pair in the cross hair eye piece. Loosen the DEC knob of your Eq mount. Let the RA axis not to be loosened. Further, please start the RA motor and hence the tracking. In case of GoTo capability, please ensure the tracking is On, while the 3 Star alignment being bypassed. Rotate the telescope around DEC axis such that the second star of the pair is in the Cross hair eye piece. In the first attempt, the second star almost certainly will not be at the center of cross hair eye piece. And you need corrections. At this point, take the help of the finder with its wider field of view. Identify the position of the second star whether it is below or above the finder cross hair. Adjust the Azimuth of the mount through the coarse or fine depending on how off the second star has been. o   Tip : In case, someone is facing difficulty in finding which direction to move Azimuth of the mount for correction, the following tips may be of use. A simple way to determine is to locate where the second star lies with respect to cross hair. Assume it is on the lower side of cross hair. Then the correction in the Azimuth of the mount should be such that the star is moved upward. It may be noted that your finder can be either inverting or non-inverting. Now, to determine the movement, please hold the finger on the lower side in front of the primary of the finder. And slowly lift the finger towards the center of the primary to obstruct it and continue moving upward. While doing so, please observe from the eyepiece. The blackish ghost image of finger will be seen moving. If movement is lower to upward, the optics is non-inverting. If ghost image moves from up to down, it is inverting. With this small trick, you would know how to apply correction. Once the correction is done, please point the finder to the first and then second star alternately simply by rotating around Dec axis of the mount. Both stars will be seen at the cross hair. At this point, coarse polar alignment is done. Now, please use the main telescope cross hair to locate the first and then second star using Dec axis movement. If required, please carry out the necessary Azimuth correction. Again, please use the above small trick to find out more on how to apply correction. At this point, please note that at the telescope’s high power ( with cross hair eyepiece), the Dec axis is correctly tracing two stars in your pair. Note that NCP/SCP lie on the same Dec axis. The Azimuth alignment of NCP/SCP is achieved. No more touching of azimuth knob of your Equatorial mount now. Step 3
      Site the pair of stars of the same Dec from the table 2 below. Now, while choosing the pair, please identify roughly the midpoint of them. Now, select that pair whose midpoint is relatively closest to the Zenith. With this, one star is relatively East ward and other one almost at a same distance but Westward. This will reduce the error due to atmospheric refraction of siting those stars. Choosing such pair, will get better alignment In case you are unable to select a pair, please read Step 4. Note that the NCP and SCP lie on the centre of the Dec circle which the above pair inscribes. Locate the first star in the cross hair of finder. To locate the second star, please lock Dec axis. But loosen the Eq axis and rotate the telescope around Eq axis. Please carry out Alt adjustments of the mount. Please use similar procedure and tricks as in the step 2. Once the two stars are in the cross hair positions of the telescope, the polar alignment is completed. Step 4 ( only if you could not carry out Step 3)
      Site the pair of stars of the same RA from the table 1 below. Now, while choosing the pair, please select another pair which is off zenith. Please try to select such pair which has both stars approx same elevation from horizon, so that their atmospheric refraction is almost same. Effectively, we cancel the atmospheric refraction influence. Please note that in step 2, NCP/SCP is located to be on one of the RA lines. Now, we use another RA line with this newly selected pair. Again, for these stars to be centred, please keep Eq axis fixed and only move Dec axis ( similar to step 2). However this time, the mount corrections to be done are using Alt adjustments. Once the two stars are in the cross hair positions of the telescope, the polar alignment is completed. Mathematics
       
      The starting point was the star catalog where the Epoch 2000 is taken as baseline. Then I selected the stars brighter than mag 4.5. I applied the corrections due to Earth Precession and also the individual star’s proper motion. With the base data was ready for today's’ star positions. Then I programmatically picked up all pairs for same RA (within 0.001 difference) and later all pairs with same Dec (within 0.001 difference).
      I found mag 4.5 to be heuristically optimal. This magnitude is sufficient for visual locating these stars. Also, the number stars shortlisted from the main catalog is good enough to give sufficient number of required pairs.
      The pairs located today may not be valid after say couple of years due to Earth Precession and stellar proper motion. The below two tables will need fresh computation then.
      Disclaimer: I have tried few of the above mathematically found pairs from my location 19 Lat 73 Log. I use Bresser ExOS 2 mount. After the polar alignment, the tracking was tested for 10 min which was adequate for my current level of astrophotography.
      At different altitudes, different latitudes, this is not tested. I believe, the method will definitely work for small exposures. It is to be validated if this method works for very long exposures.
      Star Pairs
      Table 1 : Star pairs with same RA ( useful for Step 2 and 4)
       
      Sr No
      First star  (name)
      First star HD Id
      Second star ( name)
      Second star HD Id
      1
      Gam Cas
      5394
      37 And
      5448
      2
      Nu Per
      23230
      19 Tau
      23338
      3
      Ups Tau
      28024
      71 Tau
      28052
      4
      90 Tau
      29388
      53 Eri
      29503
      5
      Kap Lep
      33949
      Rho Ori
      33856
      6
      The Aur
      40312
      Del Aur
      40035
      7
      Gam Mon
      43232
      Eta Gem
      42995
      8
      Eps Gem
      48329
      30 Gem
      48433
      9
      13 CMa
      50013
      V0415 Car
      50337
      10
      Omi CMa
      50877
      The CMa
      50778
      11
      P Pup
      63922
      Xi Pup
      63700
      12
      Chi Car
      65575
      11 Pup
      65228
      13
      Del Hyd
      73262
      E Vel
      73634
      14
      B Vel
      74180
      V343 Car
      74375
      15
      Iot Cnc
      74739
      Eps Hyd
      74874
      16
      31 Leo
      87837
      Alp Sex
      87887
      17
      Pi Cen
      98718
      Sig Leo
      98664
      18
      Lam Mus
      102249
      Nu Vir
      102212
      19
      Alp Crv
      105452
      Del Cen
      105435
      20
      Gam Cen
      110304
      Gam Vir
      110380
      21
      5 Boo
      120477
      2 Cen
      120323
      22
      SHT 56
      129116
      Alp Lup
      129056
      23
      Del Her
      156164
      Pi Her
      156283
      24
      102 Her
      166182
      Pi Pav
      165040
      25
      110 Her
      173667
      Phi Sgr
      173300
      26
      Zet Cap
      204075
      Gam Pav
      203608
      27
      Del Gru
      213009
      Del Cep
      213306
      28
      Iot Cep
      216228
      Mu Peg
      216131
      29
      Bet Peg
      217906
      Bet Psc
      217891
       
      Table 2 : Star pairs with same Dec ( useful for Step 3)
       
      Sr No
      First star  (name)
      First star HD
      Second star ( name)
      Second star HD
      1
      7 Cam
      31278
      Gam UMaj
      103287
      2
      Iot Cyg
      184006
      The Boo
      126660
      3
      H Persi
      26630
      Dmi?? Cass
      4180
      4
      Pi Aur
      40239
      Iot Her
      160762
      5
      39 Cyg
      194317
      Omi Persi
      23180
      6
      Eta Peg
      215182
      Zet Cyg
      202109
      7
      Iot Cnc
      74739
      Bet Tau
      35497
      8
      Bet Peg
      217906
      Vet Cyg
      183912
      9
      54 Leo
      94601
      Alp Vul
      183439
      10
      Alp Tau
      29139
      Gam Gem
      47105
      11
      Mu Ceti
      17094
      Lam Ori
      36861
      12
      Omi Psc
      10761
      Bet Cnc
      69267
      13
      Pi Ori
      30836
      Del Hyd
      73262
      14
      3 Agr
      198026
      Lam Agr
      177756
      15
      Iot Ori
      37043
      Iot Vir
      124850
      16
      Lam Eri
      33328
      Eta Eri
      18322
      17
      The Lib
      142198
      Del Crv
      108767
      18
      Bet Cet
      4128
      Bet CMaj
      44743
      19
      88 Aqr
      218594
      Pi Sgr
      178524
      20
      88 Aqr
      218594
      Xi Oph
      156897
      21
      4 Xi CMaj
      46328
      3 Eri???
      18978
      22
      Rho Pup
      67523
      Omi CMaj
      50877
      23
      Omc Cau???
      56139
       
      61555
      24
      Bet Hyd
      103192
      43 Eri
      28028
      25
      2 Cen
      120323
      Eps Sgr
      169022
      26
      Alp CrA
      178253
      Mu Seo
      151890
      27
      Bet CrA
      178345
      Lam Gru
      209688
      28
      Phi Cen
      121743
      Eta Cen
      127972
      29
      Eta Col
      40808
       
      73634
      30
      Vel
      78647
      Gam Phe
      9053
       
      Good luck
      Ashirwad Tillu ( ashirwadtillu@gmail.com), user name ( antariksha)
    • By Phillips6549
      Hi All
      When I use SynscanInit to help me to Polar Align, it shows me an image of Polaris against an Octans reticle (as fitted in my Polar Alignment Scope) as follows:

       
      However, when I look through my Polar Alignment Scope, the image I see is like this:

      It's upside down with respect to the SynscanInit view. 
      So my questions are:
      1. Is my Polar Alignment Scope fitted upside down in my mount (SW EQ3-Pro)? 
      2. If not, How do I read the information from SynscanInit?  Should I position Polaris in the corresponding position, ie at the top of my view?
       
      Thanks in advance
      Mark
      P.S. Sorry for the huge pictures.
       
       
    • By LR Watanabe
      Okay, I'll try to make this as short as possible. 
      Info: I have a EQ5 mount (soon to become motorised and GOTO'd) and, after reading countless astrophotographers praise the QHY PoleMaster, I thought it'd be a good idea to follow in their footsteps and buy myself a PoleMaster. 
      I saw nothing about the PoleMaster supporting the EQ5, so I thought I'd ask whether or not the PoleMaster would make my life easier by supporting the EQ5.
       
      Clear skies,
      Leon.
    • By Ariasyhari
      So i just got my first telescope as a gift for my birthday which is celestron powerseeker 114EQ, and what i want to ask is do i have to do the polar alignment before i use it and what is the purpose of polar alignment?
    • By Terrierist
      Hello all.
      I've recently come across a great app - before I go any further, I have no interest in this app financially at all.
      As a newcomer to the hobby, I have found polar alignment quite challenging what with learning where Polaris is at any given point and how to align with a polar scope. I've got a QHY Polemaster but that doesn't let me set up in the day or at a location where Polaris isn't visible.
      Along comes PS Align Pro and although I'd used it for levelling the mount and the weather forecasting side of things, until today I was unaware that you can use the app to ROUGHLY polar align during the day/when Polaris isn't visible. Hopefully, this set of images and step-by-step instructions will help another newcomer like myself to get somewhere near polar alignment without a significant purchase, I think the app cost me about £3.00.
      On opening the app you set up your time date and location, after this you can change  to various polar alignment reticules, make calculations and allsorts with this app, it is quite astounding.

      So, how do you align during the day? You'll need a piece of timber that is a similar width to your Dovetail/Scope mount, two short screws, a means to cut a piece of wood for a smartphone holder, a means of setting the wood square and some good old elastic bands.
      Step one
      Remove your scope from the mount and try your selected bit of timber in its place, we're using timber to 'try' and stop any metallic interference between mount and phone. Don't clamp it too tight, you may well damage or split the timber, tighten it just enough to get a good hold.

       
      Step Two
      Cut a 'noggin' from the end and make sure it has a square/level edge, this can be done with a simple set square etc.

       
      Step Three
      Insert one screw, you are better drilling a pilot hole to help you drive the screw home without splitting your 'noggin'.

       
      Step Four
      Align the noggin with your square and install the second screw.

      You should now be able to rest your phone/smart device thus

       
      Step Five
      Transfer the timber to your mount and attach the smart device with the super technical 'laccy bands! The image in the back is me and the Missus in Monte-Carlo BTW!

      Step Six, level the mount.
      You can use your preferred method or use the apps own level and compass bearing to roughly point you in the right way.
       
      Now, click done on the app and press the icon that looks like the sun, this will bring up the day time polar alignment module.

       
      If you're somewhere near, the app will look like this
       

      Follow the prompts (seen above as Up and R, note the arrows) and adjust your RA/DEC adjustments, the cross will start to move.

       
      Your aim is to get it looking like this or with the centre a little bit closer, I couldn't get it just right whilst screen-shotting the image!
       

      That's it!! You're somewhere near polar-aligned during the day or if Polaris isn't visible, this may not be good enough for no-trail images, but it will get you a lot closer than guesswork.
      Step Seven
      Replace scope onto the mount and you should be good to go, check your PA when it goes dark, there are other parts of this app that will help you with that too.
      Really hope this helps someone.
       
      Kev
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.