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Here's some images I shot yesterday morning at Valley of Rocks in Lynton, North Devon.

All taken just with my tripod mounted dSLR, no tracking.

I did take extra long exposures for the foreground which I intended to add to the images in post but it was so dark that by the time the foreground was exposed enough in camera it was very, very noisy so I left them out. You can make out the silhouette of the rocky hilltops just about though.

All images were taken at ISO800 & were a stack using DSS of 3 frames of 15secs each apart from the Ursa Minor which was 40secs exposures.

 

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Jupiter in Virgo by 1CM69, on Flickr

 

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Cassiopeia by 1CM69, on Flickr

 

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Orion & the Winter Triangle by 1CM69, on Flickr

 

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Ursa Minor by 1CM69, on Flickr

 

thanks for looking.

 

 

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