Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_30_second_exp_2_winners.thumb.jpg.b5430b40547c40d344fd4493776ab99f.jpg

Stu

Finally - First light with VX12L

Recommended Posts

I've had this scope for some months now but last night was the first time I managed a look through it. Only about 45mins unfortunately, and earlier in the evening so that although it was dark, Orion hadn't come into view. I'll save that pleasure for another night.

I didn't bother to collimate it, being short of time, but a quick star test showed it to be pretty close despite picking it up from Exeter, and then a fruitless trip to Lucksall and back. This is the third lovely scope I've bought from Mike73 :).

Even with my 80mm finder and Telrad on, the balance was pretty good, no need for any counterweights or use of the friction break. I only used three eyepieces, a 40mm TMB Paragon, 24mm Panoptic and a 12.5mm BGO. These gave a nice spread of mags, and the 40mm was very handy as a finder. The scope is crying out for a 21mm Ethos though really, but that will have to wait and I suspect balance will need address with one of these lumps in the focuser.

Somewhat infuriatingly, the sky later on was even better than when I was observing. The seeing looked very steady and Orion was beautifully clear! However, I got to use the scope so that's what's important. Quite a few lower targets were obscured, so the Double Cluster seemed like a good place to start. I still prefer a good frac on the DC, despite the obviously brighter and deeper view through the 12". The other night, through the 4" fluorite the stars were just stunning; last night, far more stars were resolved, but I didn't get that same warm glow. There's nothing wrong with the optics, 0.987 strehl, 1/8th wave is good enough for me, but it does illustrate the difference.

I thought I would check Polaris to see just how well it performed on resolving the tiny secondary. The answer was... beautifully. Even with just the 24mm Panoptic in at x66, the secondary was a very tight pinpoint sitting on one of the diffraction spikes. I suspect with better collimation the views with doubles will be excellent. The dual speed focuser on the scope is very smooth and accurate, a joy to use and it is fitted with a Baader Clicklock, heated dewstrip and a1.25" Howie Glatter Parallizer, all great kit which works well, I had no issues with dew despite the damp conditions.

M36 and 38 showed the real benefits of aperture. In the four inch under these skies they are nothing to write home about, but last night they resolved beautifully into proper open clusters, a lovely sprinkling of stars, particularly M38. My old favourite of NGC457 gave me my normal smile when I saw it, a great fun target.

Last target in this short session was Caroline's Rose. Under a dark sky this is a lovely target, but even last night it was great to see. Quite subtle with the LP but lovely features becoming visible with time, the dark curved lanes creating the petals of the rose quite clearly. Averted vision helped, but considering that I wasn't very well dark adapted it was a nice view.

So, another long report about a short session ;). Nice to have finally used the scope and for it to deliver what I hoped for. The optics seem excellent and it has been modded in a way which gives me everything I could want, including flocking of the top and bottom thirds of the OTA.

Nice and quick to setup, next stop M42, and who knows, perhaps the Pup ;)

  • Like 18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to hear you managed to get this lovely scope out at last, Stu.

My VX12 has probably seen about an hour of clear sky since July :cry:

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice one Stu, glad you finally got to take a look, its a pain but part of the hobby when waiting to get first light with a new scope i had same problem when i got my second 150 pro mak, it just sat about for ages,  it was cloudy when i turned in last night but must have cleared in the early hours

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice report and 1st light Stu :thumbright:

Your scope is exactly the same optical spec as mine except newer. They are great performers IMHO :icon_biggrin:

Good for outreach I've found as well - showpiece objects really have some impact even for novice observers.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely Stu, get it out to a darker site for the new moon . Everything looks so lovely with little light pollution,

old Nick.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your public wants pictures! Sounds great, look forward to reading more about it over the coming month months.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great report Stu, cracking scope mate, ive had one on my must get list for a while, thay have a inpressive rep. goodluck and clear skys charl.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, DirkSteele said:

Your public wants pictures! Sounds great, look forward to reading more about it over the coming month months.

I think I've posted these somewhere else Matthew, but here they are again :)

The little dew controller is great. Really lightweight but powers the eyepiece and telrad heaters perfectly well.

IMG_6433.JPG

IMG_6434.JPG

IMG_6440.JPG

IMG_6441.JPG

IMG_6442.JPG

IMG_6443.JPG

IMG_6444.JPG

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/26/2016 at 17:18, Chris Lock said:

Nice one Stu, you have a good array of quality kit back now :) 

Spoilt for choice eh ! What a great position to be in . love it :icon_biggrin:

I have read so much about the quality of Orion optics. Not so long ago I had the chance of a lovely 10" and took too long thinking about it.

Edited by Saganite
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Saganite said:

Spoilt for choice eh ! What a great position to be in . love it :icon_biggrin:

I have read so much about the quality of Orion optics. Not so long ago I had the chance of a lovely 10" and took too long thinking about it.

Well worth grabbing a used one if you can, even with top grade optics they are quite affordable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stu,

Lovely scope & I love the little extras! Your observing report is what I would expect since I have a brilliant example of the VX12 (the f4 version) myself!

Your next purchase should be a Howie Glatter Laser and Tublug - makes collimation a child's play :icon_biggrin:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like you had a great night, short but great... reading your report made me crave that next night I'll be out there observing.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Stu, 

Really interesting to hear your thoughts on the VX12L!  I was out with the VX16 last night which has the same focal length and therefore TFOVs as your VX12L given the same eyepiece (actually I get about 15% less TFOV and 15% more mag as I use a Paracorr).  I agree, the Double Cluster just doesn't have the wow in it.  I think it is partly due to the small FOV, but it could also be that even in top quality reflectors, the optics don't quite rival a quality smaller frac on that object.  With a Paracorr and a 30mm 82 degree ES I only get 1.35 degrees.

These scopes are great on M35, M36 , M37 and M38.  The definition on M37 is just fabulous.  M36 and M38 make a lot more sense than in a frac, as so many more stars resolve.  Little open clusters that you didn't know were there suddenly pop out in areas like Cygnus and Cassiopeia.  

Yes double stars look great;  last night I found two double stars at Orion's dagger that I didn't know were there before, in a lovely little group of eight stars.

You're in for a treat when you get to point it at M42; I've never seen colour in the nebula visually, but I do in the VX16 :)  The E star in the trapezium was clearly visible at x87 too.

Did you notice any secondary shadow through your 40mm?  The reason I haven't bought a 41mm is that the exit pupil would be really large on my scope as it has an F ratio of 4, so an exit pupil of 10.25mm.  In your VX12L at F5.3 the exit pupil would be a much more reasonable 7.5mm and 1.7 degrees.  

Do you still have your ES30mm 82 degree?  I'm using mine a lot in the VX16, it gives me the same field as you would get in an Ethos 21.

If I ever sell the VX16 it will be for a VX12, for more portability and a larger FOV.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Commanderfish said:

Hi Stu, 

Really interesting to hear your thoughts on the VX12L!  I was out with the VX16 last night which has the same focal length and therefore TFOVs as your VX12L given the same eyepiece (actually I get about 15% less TFOV and 15% more mag as I use a Paracorr).  I agree, the Double Cluster just doesn't have the wow in it.  I think it is partly due to the small FOV, but it could also be that even in top quality reflectors, the optics don't quite rival a quality smaller frac on that object.  With a Paracorr and a 30mm 82 degree ES I only get 1.35 degrees.

These scopes are great on M35, M36 , M37 and M38.  The definition on M37 is just fabulous.  M36 and M38 make a lot more sense than in a frac, as so many more stars resolve.  Little open clusters that you didn't know were there suddenly pop out in areas like Cygnus and Cassiopeia.  

Yes double stars look great;  last night I found two double stars at Orion's dagger that I didn't know were there before, in a lovely little group of eight stars.

You're in for a treat when you get to point it at M42; I've never seen colour in the nebula visually, but I do in the VX16 :)  The E star in the trapezium was clearly visible at x87 too.

Did you notice any secondary shadow through your 40mm?  The reason I haven't bought a 41mm is that the exit pupil would be really large on my scope as it has an F ratio of 4, so an exit pupil of 10.25mm.  In your VX12L at F5.3 the exit pupil would be a much more reasonable 7.5mm and 1.7 degrees.  

Do you still have your ES30mm 82 degree?  I'm using mine a lot in the VX16, it gives me the same field as you would get in an Ethos 21.

If I ever sell the VX16 it will be for a VX12, for more portability and a larger FOV.  

Yep, it's been a while since I pointed a 12" scope at M42. It was a VX12L f6 last time, a huge beast! Very clear green colour then I agree and plenty of detail. Strangely enough I do see similar colour (more subtle) in the Tak, particularly if I am not well dark adapted.

Agreed re open clusters (and globs) looking better with aperture. My previous 16" Sumerian was lovely on these.

I don't recall seeing any signs of the secondary shadow with the 40mm, but as you say the 16" f4 is a different beast in this respect. I will, at some point, invest in probably a 21mm Ethos as I think it would really excel in the 12".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like you have a good one.

Globs are difficult to get the best of, even in modest apertures. I get reasonable though not inspiring views in the C9.25 but, I've seen M13 through a 22"... Takes some beating and is an awesome sight.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So last night I went out with the Starwave 152 and ES 127 Triplet Apo, in very similar conditions to the previous night with the VX16.  As I set up, I was wondering if I was wasting my time after the previous night's huge aperture, but the fracs were pin sharp and very enjoyable , particularly around the Cygnus and Lyra star fields, with the larger FOVs really giving something extra to the views.  The speed and smoothness of maneouvering both scopes around the sky on the Ercole giro was fantastic, even easier and nicer than pointing the dob.  There's an interesting area of Cygnus about half way between Sadr and Albireo which is full of what seem to be visual double stars.

However, the fracs weren't great on the double cluster.  I missed the aperture here, with the stars appearing fewer and dimmer.  It was also a [removed word] to point directly up at the zenith.  So currently the Double Cluster is not a winner in the big dob or the fracs.  Hmm.

The Orion's sword area was nice to see as a whole in the fracs, and M42 was nice, but lacked the wow of the VX16 (obviously).   I thought I could see a hint of colour in M42.  Likewise, M36, M37 and M38 were a dissapointment after such huge aperture.  However, the Pleiades was nice and some large clusters/asterisms like those in Auriga were nice to view - they simply don't fit in the FOV of the big dob.

If it were practical, my dream set up would be a big dob like the VX12 with a big aperture wide/richfield scope like the Starwave 152, co-axially mounted.  

By the way, in both the VX16 and the fracs (to a much lesser extent), the unfiltered colour I see is a light blue-purple colour, compared to the green which Stu sees!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to hear you finally got out under the stars Stu. I was hoping to have a look through it at SGLXII but our clear skies luck didn't hold out as it did for SGLX :(

Sounds like you had a good session and I'm sure with a longer cool down and better collimation the views are only going to get better :) 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By DaveS
      Went to Astrofest today, and after saying that I wasn't going to buy anything put a deposit on an ODK12 .
      Should be arriving in a couple of months.
      It came at a discount, even over the show price .
    • By MikeODay
      A deep look at Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) 
      edit: re-processed from the original exposures - April 2018

      ........
      previous version:

      Omega Centauri ( please click / tap on image to see larger and much sharper )
       
      This image is an attempt to look deeply into the mighty Omega Centauri star cluster and, by using HDR techniques, record as many of its faint members as possible whilst capturing and bringing out the subtle colours of the stars, including in the core.
      ( re-processed from May 2017 subs - master dark added to workflow, new HDR / colour process workflow and stretched using ArcSinh )
       
      Image details:
      Field of view ..... 58' 32.3" x 38' 55.6"
      Image center ...... RA: 13 26 50.290 Dec: -47 28 39.80
      Orientation: East is up, North is to the right
      Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
      Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
      Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7
      Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT
      Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 
      Camera:  
      Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)
      Location:
      Blue Mountains, Australia 
      Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map )
      Capture ( May 2017 ):
      9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO800.
      Processing:
      Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark
      Integration in 9 sets
      HDR combination 
      ArcSinh stretch
      Pixinsight March 2018
      Links:
      500px.com/MikeODay
      photo.net/photos/MikeODay
      www.flickr.com/photos/mike-oday
    • By MikeODay
      21st April: Re-processed to better show the colour of the fainter stars ...
       

       
      .......
      Shimmering like a pearl to the naked eye, this open cluster of mostly young blue stars ( known as the "Pearl Cluster" ) is approximately 5500  light years from Earth and was discovered by Abbe Lacaille in 1752 from South Africa.  
      This HDR image is constructed from 11 sets of exposures ranging from 1/4 sec ( to capture the centre of the brighter stars ) through to 240 seconds ( for the fainter stars of the Milky Way ).  Total exposure time was around 5 hours.

      A Cluster of Pearls in the Southern Skies ( NGC 3766 " The Pearl Cluster" ) 
      ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be found here )
      12 April 2018
      .....
      Image details:
      Field of view ..... 58' 49.8" x 39' 36.4"
      Image center ...... RA: 11 36 03.890  Dec: -61 35 30.17
      Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px  ( full size image )
      Orientation: North is up
      Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
      Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
      Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7
      Mount: Skywatcher EQ8
      Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 
      Camera:
      Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels)
      Location:
      Blue Mountains, Australia 
      Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map )
      Capture ( 12 April 2018 ):
      11 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/4s to 240s ) all at ISO250.
      ( 70 x 240sec + 10 each forthe other durations )
      Processing:
      Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark
      Integration in 11 sets
      HDR combination 
      Pixinsight April 2018
    • By Olli
      Since getting my first scope (130p on a az pronto mount)  last Tuesday  I haven’t had much luck with clear skies as it seems to be a curse when you get new astro equipment.  I kept checking the weather forecast and today they said that it was going to be cloudy for tonight ( again ) . But when I  looked out my window at around 7pm I could see Orion in all its glory. So as quickly as I could I grabbed my scope and mount in one hand and the eyepieces in another. Wasn’t that cold out  for once so didn’t need my bobble hat or gloves! As this was an unplanned session I didn’t read up on what targets I should be looking for and also I forgot my torch which is never a good thing.
      However  as Orion was very clear and detailed tonight I thought I would look at the Orion Nebula. Managed to locate it through the red dot finder that came equipped with the scope, the finder was roughly aligned slightly out of place but good enough and then I used the slo mo controls which  are very easy to use to center it in the eyepice. I’ve never seen Nebulae through a scope before and was worried I would be disappointed after seeing all those Hubble pictures with incredible detail and  colour.However I was very wrong. I would never have thought a grey smudge  would be so amazing to look at. Through the 25mm eyepice it looked liked grey wings covering the FOV of the eyepice  with three stars in the middle of it. So after spending about 10 minutes looking through the 25mm I thought I would swap it for the supplied 10mm. Again the view was very good though not as sharp of view that i had with the 25mm and I think I may need to buy a better replacement.
      Anyway after being in awe with Orion I’d thought I would have a quick look at The seven sisters. I’ve seen m45 before with my binoculars but wanted to have a look with the scope. The view was much better in the scope I could see more starts in the cluster then I could with the binoculars after spending about 10 minutes looking at the cluster I saw a satalite quickly move across the FOV which seemed to have an orange light ( would of liked to know what it was) . So after taking my eye off the eyepice I could see that the clouds were starting to role in and was starting to rain so called it a night. I have to say Astronomy is probably one of the most relaxing and most fascinating hobbies that I’ve gotten into.
      so far I’m very impressed with this scope it’s extremely portable which I wanted for reasons like tonight it’s a perfect grab and go scope and easy to use however the supplied 10mm could be better but I can upgrade that. Has been a very good purchase for £200.
       
      Thanks for reading if you’ve gotten this far and hopefully many more enjoyable nights and reports to come  
       
    • By Badweather
      I started observing through my Celestron Nexstar 8 SE on August 18th 2017 at about 9pm
      I couldn't get the skyalign to work and just a little teeny bit frustrated with the cloudy skies and view limited by my own four story building, I looked up, saw Saturn bright and yellow in the sky and manually slewed towards it. And sure enough, when I looked into the eyepiece, I saw Saturn in my FOV.

      So, while I thought of myself as an armchair astronomer, I may have been a naked eye astronomer all along.
      A short Observing Report from 1973:

      I was introduced to Yes, Pink Floyd, and and Led Zepplin, Photography, and Saturn all in the same year by my uncle who was the sound/light guy in a local rock band in 1973. The same year he bought a telescope kit from Edmund Scientific. A Newtonian about 6 feet long and with an aperture of 6 inches. We were in the Mississippi Valley and our altitude there is 690 feet above sea level. The seeing was not bad as I recall. I don't remeber it "swimming" as I call it now. It was sometime in August or September I believe. There were still leaves on the trees, and my grandmothers back yard had a very limited view of the sky. Nearly at the zenith with a slot descending to the horizon almost. You couldn't see below about 15 degrees as I recall.

      I recall Saturn that evening displaying clear rings, the Cassini division was barely visible, just a darkness rather than a continuous yellow band around the planet. And the planet itself was a mostly featureless ball of yellow. I recall seeing no planets.
      ~ slight post topic excursion number two ~
      Since then I have followed my inclinations, become a teacher, composer, and performer of music, an amateur photographer, and an amateur astronomer (haven't dropped down the rabbit hole of AP quite yet, but it's gaping abyss is looking my way now...). I could never stop reading about astrophysics, cosmology, and astronomy the entire time between then and now. I frequently will think of an object and look it up to find it's in the southern celestial hemisphere.
      So, after a couple weeks of reading this forum and CN, and AF, I felt ready to make my purchase. I'm still quite happy with the direction I went, although I'm definitely looking at an ultra-light traveldob at 12 to 16 inch Dob (non-GOTO) as my next telescope. I love DSO hunting. But my back is not the greatest, and so I have to think of it thus the lighter option of a 203mm SCT. But I've just found a very nice light weight Dob by Hubble Optics, among others, so once I get a car, I will probably be getting at least a 12 inch Dobsonian soon after.
      ~/slight post topic excursion number two~
      With my 8SE I have seen three planets around Saturn so far.

      Following that event I just looked at the sky for two weeks before I decided to record all my observations and keep that data in a spread sheet.

      Here is a link to that spreadsheet I keep on google docs if you'd like to see the list of objects I've gazed upon:

      https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1wSgY9XWA_BcUa1l7nnmJME3D3KwghHhxr4npSz3wS20/edit?usp=sharing
      here's the list from 08/19/17 to 10/18/17
      Object    Constellation    cat & #    Messier #    Date    Time    Observation    Notes
      Saturn                08/19/2017    9:00pm MDT    I could see Saturn, rings, Cassini division, and three moons    I was unable to get the computer aligned. Too cloudy. I saw Saturn aimed the scope at it and sure enough, Saturn was in the eyepiece!
      Globular Cluster    Pegasus    NGC 7078    M15    08/28/2017    22:07    Faint fuzzy ball of light    averted vision using the 13mm revealed individual stars and granularity
      Double Double, Epsilon Lyrae    Lyra    SAO 067310        08/30/2017    22:25    I see four bright and white blueish stars    Oh wow, the pair to the north is stacked while the pair towards the south are side by side.
      Andromeda Gaslaxy    Andromeda    NGC 224    M31    08/30/2017    21:46    Big fuzzy blob tilted to one side, can't really see any dust lanes.    did not have to use averted vision
      Zeta1 Lyrae, Zeta2 Lyrae    Lyra    SAO 067321        08/30/2017            
      Ring Nebula    Lyra    NGC 6720    M57    08/30/2017    22:59    I see a blueish grey dark ring with a lighter center    A beautiful smoke ring in the sky
      Eta Cassiopeiae    Cassiopeia    SAO 021732        09/01/2017            
      Cat’s Eye nebula    Draco    NGC 6543        09/01/2017    0:12    Faint cloudiness with some faint structure.    
      Almach    Andromeda    SAO 037734        09/05/2017            
      Mirach    Andromeda    SAO 054471        09/05/2017            
      Wild Duck Cluster    Scutum    NGC 6705    M11    09/07/2017        A dusting of stars with some very large and bright members    A box of jewels in the sky
      Fomalhaut    Piscis Austrinus    SAO 214197        09/09/2017    22:30        
      Hercules Cluster    Hercules    NGC 6205    M13    09/10/2017    0:24    Fuzzy patch of light    Fuzzy ball of light. Averted vision shows individual stars.
      Double Cluster    Perseus    NGC 869 and NGC 884        09/10/2017    0:12        
      M32    Andromeda    NGC 221    M32    09/09/2017    23:28    Very faint fuzz on edge of M31    required averted vision
      M34, Perseus Open Cluster    Perseus    NGC 1039    M34    09/12/2017            
      Butterfly Cluster    Scorpius    NGC 6405    M6    09/16/2017        A delicate gathering of stars    Easily seen, clear and bright even though it is low
      Jabbah, Nu Scorpii    Scorpius    SAO 159764        09/16/2017            
      Antares. Alph Scorpii    Scorpius    SAO 184415        09/16/2017            
      Mizar and Alcor    Ursa Major    SAO 028737        09/17/2017            
      Alphecca    Corona Borealis    SAO 083893        09/17/2017            
      Tx Piscium    Pisces    SAO 128374        09/18/17        Dusty Red Star    
      36 Andromedae    Andromeda    SAO 074359        09/18/17            
      12 Aquarii    Aquarius    SAO 145064        09/18/17            
      Mu Cygni    Cygnus    SAO 089940        09/18/17            
      Saturn w/satellite                 09/18/17    7:57pm MDT     using the 25mm eyepiece, white object crossed the FOV in 2.5 seconds, moving from top of view to bottom about 2.5 times the width of Saturn to the east.
      Open Cluster    Sagittarius    NGC 6531    M21    09/18/17    8:15pm MDT    A concentration of young blue stars    see sketch, I see a triangle of stars formed by doubles of stars on two sides, and five stars on one side.
      Open Cluster    Sagittarius    NGC 6494    M23    09/18/17    8:23pm MDT    A scattering of blue stars    The stars are very blue
      Wild Duck Cluster w/ satellite    Scutum    NGC 6705    M11    09/18/17    9:33pm MDT    Saw a bright orangish, white object cross the FOV going north to the east of M11. It took 3 seconds to cross the FOV.    
      M110    Andromeda    NGC 205    M110    09/18/17    10:50pm MDT    Faint smudge of light    Very faint but visible using averted vision brings it out more.
      Open Cluster    Cassiopeia    NGC 7654    M52    09/18/17    10:56pm MDT    A mostly young and blue collection of stars    Mostly blue with a few red stars
      Open Cluster    Cassiopeia    NGC 581    M103    09/18/17    11:06pm MDT    A rich field of young and old stars    
      Open Cluster    Cassiopeia    NGC 225        09/18/17    11:12pm MDT     a beautiful mix of blue and red stars    
      Pleiades    Taurus        M45    09/19/17    12:16am MDT    Bright collection of very blue stars    beautiful, maybe it's my imagination but I think I can see slight nebulosity,
                                  
      Blue Snowball Nebula    Andromeda    NGC 7662        09/19/17    10:22pm MDT    Very light blue, illuminated from within    at higher magnification I can just make out some differences in the center. Very simjilar to M57 but much clearer. Did not compare to M57 this evening. Should have done that.
      Globular Cluster    Aquarius    NGC 7089    M2    09/19/17    10:46pm MDT    Faint fuzzy ball of light    I can see some granularity and with averted vision individual stars.
      Dumbell Nebula, Apple Core Nebula    Vulpecula    NGC 6853    M27    09/19/17    11:36pm MDT    Bright and white planetary, with clear structure    I remembered to try my LP filter. An Orion Orion Ultrablock Narrowband LP filter. It worked really well. I took a break while I was viewing M27, when i went inside, I forgot my eyepatch and blew my dark adaptation. When I returned, I found I couldn't quite see the nebula without removing the filter. After which I could put the filter back in and see it again.
      Triangulum Galaxy    Triangulum    NGC 598    M33    09/20/17    12:21am MDT    Very faint fog covering the stars.    I can only make this object out if I slew the telescope. Can see a faint patch of fuzzy, when eyes averted and it's moving.
                                  
                                  
      Milky Way                09/20/17    20:50    Can clearly see the Milky Way all the way to the horizon. It's washed out a bit, but quite visible. Bortle 4 I believe.    
      Andromeda Galaxy    Andromeda    NGC 224    M31    09/20/17    21:01    I can clearly see the central bulge and the dust lanes of the outer skirt    averted vision helped pull out details
      Wild Duck cluster    Scutum    NGC 6705    M11    9/20/2017    21:03    Very bright concentration of stars against a velvety black    
      Whirlpool Galaxy    Canes Venatici    NGC 5194    M51    09/20/17    21:12    A definite spiral galaxy    beautiful spiral shape, impossible to see this detail in Fort Collins
      Hercules Cluster    Hercules    NGC 6205    M13    09/20/17    21:27    A tight cluster of stars    individual stars at 17mm rather than the 13mm required in Fort Collins
      Triangulum Galaxy    Triangulum    NGC 598    M33    09/20/17    21:41    Very faint. Could see it without averted vision.    Averted vision helped reveal some detail in the spiral shape
      The Little Dumbbell Nebula    Perseus    NGC 650/651    M76    09/20/17    21:58    A white, cloudy, brightness    Very sharp outlines. I can see filaments.
      Cigar Galaxy    Ursa Major    NGC 3034    M82    09/20/17    22:19    I see a cigar shape tapering at both ends    did not need averted vision
      Bode's Galaxy    Ursa Major    NGC 3031    M81    09/20/17    22:22    very bright spiral galaxy    Beautiful spiral shape. Looking towards the darkest skies to the north I cloud see dust lanes
      The Owl Nebula    Ursa Major    NGC 3587    M97    09/20/17    22:33    Very faint nebula    Very Faint. Needed narrowband LP filter. Averted vision helped.
      Dumbbell Nebula    Vulpecula    NGC 6853    M27    09/20/17    22:40    Very bright nebula    I could clearly see structure outside the bright center. I could see that there was a bright star in the center illuminating it.
                                  
      Kemble's Cascade    Camelopardalis            9/30/2017    0:37    A beautiful cascade of stars    Still have not seen this naked eye or with 10x50s
      Open Cluster    Camelopardalis    NGC 1502        9/30/2017    0:38    A small group of stars    
      M29    Cygnus    NGC 6913    M29    9/30/2017    0:52    an intimate collection of stars    
      M2    Aquarius    NGC 7089    M2    9/30/2017    1:08    A tight ball of stars    was able to see individual stars without averted vision
      M77    Cetus    NGC 1068    M77    9/30/2017    1:21    I thought this was a star Cluster (see sketch below). So I was as wrong as Messier, and Herschel. And therefore, technically not yet seen.    
      M42    Orion    NGC 1976    M42    9/30/2017    1:32    Bright and clear nebulosity you can stare at directly. I see four trapezium stars.    Wow, this is awesome. I know, I should have sketched it, but the wall of dew was approaching. I went to grab my notebook, and it was wet. Glistening with dew. I turned the hair dryer on it and went back to look at the Orion Nebula again for a few more minutes...
                                  
      Ptolemy Cluster    Scorpius    NGC 6475    M7    10/04/2017    19:33    A nice scattering of stars.    
      Butterfly Cluster    Scorpius    NGC 6405    M6    10/04/2017    19:39    A nice tight group of blue stars. I notice one I’ll call “red” to redish yellow off to one side.    
      Open Cluster    Sagittarius    NGC 6530        10/04/2017    20:56    I consider this a nice grouping of stars    The moon is full, I'm not using an eyepatch at all
      M21, Open Cluster    Sagittarius    NGC 6531    M21    10/04/2017    21:28    a small handful of stars    
      Wild Duck Cluster    Scutum    NGC 6705    M11    10/04/2017    21:34    Clear, bright stars with diamond dust underneath    
      Open Cluster    Sagittarius    IC 4725    M25    10/04/2017    21:45    About 35 stars in a loose group    
      Open Cluster    Sagittarius    NGC 6613    M18    10/04/2017    21:50    A noticeable concentration of blue stars    
      Checkmark Nebula    Sagittarius    Sharpless 45    M17    10/04/2017    21:57    a sparse collection of stars    
      Eagle Nebula    Sagittarius    NGC 6611    M16    10/04/2017    22:02    a medium sized collection of mostly blue stars    
      M2, Open Cluster    Aquarius    NGC 7089    M2     10/04/2017    23:40    a compact ball of stars    I can see granularity and individual stars at the edge
      M71, Globular Cluster    Sagitta     NGC 6838    M71    10/04/2017    0:12    A very faint globular dusting of stars    
      M29    Cygnus    NGC 6913    M29    10/04/2017    0:32    an intimate collection of stars    
      Blinking Planetary    Cygnus    NGC 6826        10/04/2017    0:40    Small, white, obviously not a star or comet    
                                  
      Pleiades    Taurus        M45    10/06/2017    22:31    A bunch of blue jewels in space    
      Coat Hanger Cluster, Al Sufi's Cluster or Brocchi's Cluster.    Vulpecula    Cr 399        10/06/2017    22:47    I see a coat hanger!    
      Andromeda Galaxy    Andromeda    NGC 224    M31    10/06/2017    23:11        
      Hyades    Taurus    Caldwell 41        10/06/2017    23:23        
                                  
      Andromeda Galaxy    And    NGC 224    M31    10/07/2017    20:30        
      Saturn                10/07/2017            
      Uranus                10/07/2017            
      carbon star SAO 012874    Cam    SAO 012874        10/07/2017            
      Kembles Cascade    Cam            10/07/2017            failed to spot this with binos
      Owl Cluster, ET Cluster    Cas    NGC 457        10/07/2017            
      Pacman Nebula    Cas    NGC 281        10/07/2017            failed to spot this with binos
      Pacman Cluster    Cas    IC 1590        10/07/2017            
                                  
      Andromeda Galaxy    And    NGC 224    M31    10/09/2017            
      M7, Ptolemy Cluster    Scorpius    NGC 6475    M7    10/09/2017            
      M25, Open Cluster    Sagittarius    IC 4725    M25    10/09/2017            
      M11, Wild Duck Cluster    Scutum    NGC 6705    M11    10/09/2017            
      NGC 281, Pacman nebula    Cas    NGC 281        10/09/2017            
      NGC 457, open Cluster    Cas    NGC 457        10/09/2017            
      M103, open Cluster    Cas    NGC 581    M103    10/09/2017            
      NGC 884, Double Cluster    Perseus            10/09/2017            
      M76, little Dumbbell Nebula    Perseus    NGC 650/651    M76    10/09/2017            
      M33, Triangulum Galaxy    Tri    NGC 598        10/09/2017            
      M52, Open Cluster    Cas    NGC 7654    M52    10/09/2017    21:55    a good collection of mostly blue stars    
      Open Cluster    Cas    NGC 663        10/09/2017    22:11    A dense collection of young blue stars    
      NGC 185, galaxy    And    NGC 185        10/09/2017            
      NGC 7789, Open cluster    Cas    NGC 7789        10/09/2017    21:53    A concentration of many stars, most very blue    
      M27, Dumbbell Nebula    Vulpecula    NGC 6853        10/09/2017    22:04        
      M57, Ring Nebula    Lyra    NGC 6720    M57    10/09/2017            
      M13, Hercules Cluster    Hercules    NGC 6205    M13    10/09/2017            
      Pleiades    Taurus            10/09/2017            
      Cat's Eye Nebula        NGC 6543        10/09/2017            
                                  
      M8, Lagoon Nebula    Sagittarius    NGC 6523    M8    10/10/2017    20:43    Very clear nebulosity!    Cannot see this at all with my unpatched eye. Favorite eyepiece 17mm
      M10, globular cluster    Ophiuchus    NGC 6254    M10    10/10/2017    21:29    Faint smudge of greyish white.    can see individual stars with averted vision
      Andromeda Galaxy    And    NGC 224    M31    10/10/2017    21:45    Very clear and bright tonight    
      M16, Eagle Nebula    Serpens    NGC 6611    M16    10/10/2017    21:51    Nebulosity faint but visible    Needed averted vision to see it.
      The Omega Nebula, Checkmark nebula    Sagittarius    Sharpless 45    M17    10/10/2017    21:55    Very clear nebulosity here    I noticed I thought this was an open cluster last time I looked when the moon was high. I wasn't taking it seriously so I didn't wear my eyepatch either.
                                  
      M24, Small Sagittarius Star Cloud    Sagittarius    IC 4715    M24    10/11/2017    20:12    Very dense star field    Somewhat washed out due to Bortle 6 to 7 skies
      M8, Lagoon Nebula    Sagittarius    NGC 6523    M8    10/11/2017    20:24    Very clear nebulosity    
      M20, The Trifid Nebula    Sagittarius    NGC 6514    M20    10/11/2017    20:33    Faint but visible. Can see edges of cloud forms with AV    
      M17, The Omega Nebula, Checkmark nebula    Sagittarius    Sharpless 45    M17    10/11/2017    21:09    Very clear checkmark    
      Blinking Planetary    Cygnus    NGC 6826        10/11/2017    21:26    small dense white cloud    
      M27, Dumbbell Nebula    Vulpecula    NGC 6853    M27    10/11/2017    21:38    Bright and clearly defined edges without AV    This is the brightest nebula in the sky above Fort Collins
      M57, Ring nebula    Lyra    NGC 6720    M57    10/11/2017    21:56    Smoke ring in the sky    clear, and dark bluish grey
      M11, Wild Duck cluster    Scutum    NGC 6705    M11    10/11/2017    22:09    A very nice density of stars    
                                  
      Saturn nebula    Aquarius    NGC 7009        10/12/2017    20:16    Very small, white oval of nebula    17mm and 13mm gave the best views
      Pacman Nebula    Cas    NGC 281        10/12/2017    20:50    only see the stars    
      Barnard's Galaxy    Sagittarius    NGC 6822        10/12/2017    21:12    Another oval smudge    used LP filter
      Planetary Nebula    Aquila    NGC 6852        10/12/2017    21:19    tiny white nebula    17mm is best here I think
      M17, Checkmark Nebula    Sagittarius    Sharpless 45    M17    10/12/2017    21:32    amazing nebulosity here    
      M27, Dumbbell nebula    Vulpecula    NGC 6853    M27    10/12/2017    21:50    not quite as defined this evening.    
      NGC 6572                10/12/2017    22:26    10mm eyepiece reveals this is not a star but a very bright planetary nebula    
      NGC 6210                10/12/2017    22:56    I see three things.    
      M27, Dumbbell nebula    Vulpecula    NGC 6853    M27    10/12/2017    23:17    Bright as usual    
      M57    Lyra    NGC 6270    M57    10/12/2017    23:28    smoky ring in the sky is blueish    
      SAO 012870    Cam            10/12/2017    23:37    red star. I slew to Kembles cascade from here  
      M76, Little Dumbbell Nebula    Perseus    NGC 650/651    M76    10/12/2017    23:55    Faint but does not require AV    
      M39, open Cluster    Cygnus    NGC 7092    M39    10/13/2017    1:03    a small handful of stars    
      M42    Orion    NGC 1976    M42    10/12/2017    1:17    amazing nebulosity    Without the LP filter I could see the four trapezium stars without AV
                                  
      M31    Andromeda    NGC 224    M31    10/15/2017    21:27    Very bright this evening, can see some detail in the outer disk more easily than on other evenings    
      M92    Hercules    NGC 6341    M92    10/15/2017    22:39    A very tight ball of white fog.    AV reveals some individual stars at higher magnifications
      M13    Hercules    NGC 6205    M13    10/15/2017    22:30    Fabulously clear tonight.    I can see individual stars with less magnification than usual. 17mm reveals granularity and individual stars where 13mm is usually required.
      M56    Lyra    NGC 6779    M56    10/15/2017    23:12    a fuzzy white patch of fog    
      M42    Orion    NGC 1976    M42    10/15/2017    0:22    Clear and bright nebulosity    
                                  
      M8, Lagoon nebula    Sagittarius    NGC 6523    M8    10/17/2017    20:09    Still an amazing sight    
      M17, Omega, Checkmark Nebula    Sagittarius    Sharpless 45    M17    10/17/2017    20:17    Just see the check mark    
      M20. Triffid nebula    Sagittarius    NGC 6514    M20    10/17/2017    20:23    Faint but visible nebulosity. AV reveals details.    
      M110, Galaxy    And    NGC 205    M110    10/17/2017    20:21    A faint but detectable fogginess.    I needed to slew the telescope to see this
      M31, Andromeda Galaxy    And    NGC 224    M31    10/17/2017    20:25    Quite brright this evening.     i can see some detail in the outer disk without AV
      M32 Dwarf Eliptical Galaxy    And    NGC 221    M32    10/17/2017    20:27    Bright and clear    can see both M31 and M32 together while M110 is quite a ways off.
      M110, Galaxy    And    NGC 205    M110    10/17/2017    20:31    I found it this time without goto.    
      M13, Hercules Cluster    Hercules    NGC 6205    M13    10/17/2017    20:36    A nice glob tonight. Very clear.    Lower magnifications reveal individual stars in this glob tonight. 17mm, and the 13, and 10mm are awesome. I like the Svbony 10mm aspheric on these globs, it shows good detail, while retaining good contrast.
      M92, Globular Cluster    Hercules    NGC 6341    M92    10/17/2017    20:50    Tight and white    takes real mag to bring out individual stars
      M34, Open Cluster    Perseus    NGC 1039    M34    10/17/2017    21:33    A sparse collection of stars    
      M15, Globular Cluster    Perseus    NGC 7078    M15    10/17/2017    21:45    Faint fuzzy ball of light    averted vision using the 13mm revealed individual stars and granularity
      M27, Dumbbell Nebula    Vulpecula    NGC 6853    M27    10/17/2017    21:58    A nebula brightly lit from inside by a white dwarf star    
      M57, Ring Nebula    Lyra    NGC 6720    M57    10/17/2017    22:08    smoly ring    
      M2, Globular Cluster    Aquarius    NGC 7089    M2    10/17/2017    22:15    Very tight globular cluster.    Take significant magnification (10mm, 8mm, 6mm) to reveal individual stars using AV
                                  
      Butterfly Cluster    Scorpius    NGC 6405    M6    10/18/2017            
      Ptolemy Cluster    Scorpius    NGC 6475    M7    10/18/2017            
      Lagoon nebula    Sagittarius    NGC 6523    M8    10/18/2017            
      Delle Caustiche, Sagittarius Star Cloud    Sagittarius    IC 4715    M24    10/18/2017            
      Triffid Nebula    Sagittarius    NGC 6514    M20    10/18/2017        More visible than the usual fogginess, just a hint of structure    
      Eagle Nebula    Sagittarius    NGC 6611    M16    10/18/2017            
      Omega, or Checkmark Nebula    Sagittarius    Sharpless 45    M17    10/18/2017            
      M30, Globular Cluster    Capricornus    NGC 7099    M30    10/18/2017    22:39    A tight white globular, not quite circular    
      M72    Aquarius    NGC 6981    M72    10/18/2017    22:53    Very Faint Foggy Patch    
      Saturn nebula    Aquarius    NGC 7009        10/18/2017            
      Blinking Planetary    Cygnus    NGC 6826        10/18/2017        Small white planetary nebula    
      Double Cluster    Perseus    NGC 884        10/18/2017        A bright and generous scattering of stars    
      M34, Open Cluster    Perseus    NGC 1039    M34    10/18/2017        A sparse collection of stars    
      NGC 1514    Taurus    NGC 1514        10/18/2017            
      M73    Aquarius    NGC 6994    M73    10/18/2017        Four stars    
      NGC 6543    Draco    NGC 6543        10/18/2017            
      M27    Vulpecula    NGC 6853    M27    10/18/2017            
      M57    Lyra    NGC 6270    M57    10/18/2017            
      Aldebaran    Taurus            10/18/2017        A redish star    
      Hyades    Taurus            10/18/2017        A very interesting group of stars   
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.