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Monochrome DSLR or mirrorless conversion?


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I was wondering has anyone converted his/her dslr or mirrorless camera for monochrome imaging?

This looks interesting, I was just wondering about the real gain, putting it differently, how much do we loose on microlenses, which

come off alongside the Bayer array.

I'd be interested in side-by-side shots, under the same conditions: B&W and Bayer version.

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