Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_30_second_exp_2_winners.thumb.jpg.b5430b40547c40d344fd4493776ab99f.jpg

orion25

A Really Supermoon!

Recommended Posts

November 14, 2016, the closest moon approach since 1948! A scant 221,524 miles away, the moon won't be nearly this close again until November 25, 2034. Smoke from North Georgia wildfires casts a thin veil over the night sky, but not enough to blot out the SUPERMOON!

Cheers and high tides!

Reggie

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great vid Reggie, nothing but cloud and fog here in south wales, but after seeing your vid I don't feel as bad for missing it.  thanks, charl.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find that the most obvious difference at Supermoon is the increased visual brightness, excellent though they are, the stand alone images could be any full moon unless they are either paired with a "normal" image with the same photographic specifications or against some form of backdrop.  :icon_biggrin:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Peter Drew said:

I find that the most obvious difference at Supermoon is the increased visual brightness, excellent though they are, the stand alone images could be any full moon unless they are either paired with a "normal" image with the same photographic specifications or against some form of backdrop.  :icon_biggrin:

Yes, you're right, Peter, about the stand-alone images. And the term "supermoon" has been applied rather loosely over the past few years to apply to any monthly perigee. I'd like to catch several moonrises, including a Supermoon, for comparison at some point. But for now, it's enough for me to know that this one is especially close, at least until 2034! :happy6:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, johnfosteruk said:

Stunning Reggie. Cloud here and saw nothing

Thanks, John, and this video was shot through a thin veil of smoke from wildfires to the north. It's been very dry here, which is good for astronomy, but dangerous for fires. I would actually appreciate a little cloud WITH RAIN to clear things out (but only for a few days)!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, xtreemchaos said:

great vid Reggie, nothing but cloud and fog here in south wales, but after seeing your vid I don't feel as bad for missing it.  thanks, charl.

Thanks, Charl. Though it's been smoky here, with the winds blowing off wildfires to the north. We need a little cloud and rain to clear things out!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/15/2016 at 18:01, laudropb said:

Lovely video. Rained here for the last 3 days so no view possible.

Thanks. I hope it clears there, soon. We really need rain here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By PeterW
      @Stu, @GavStar and myself met up for a bit of club observing Thursday night… cloudy so good that we met down the pub. Someone (not sure who) pointed out it was clear, so we headed out to stand and chat under clouds with a chill breeze for more than 2hours waiting for the skies to comply with Sat24. Finally we spotted what looked like the edge of the clouds… the others got ready to polar align. OK observing under a near full moon is not ideal.. but it does help with setup and checking your charts! 
      So what to look for… using Gavins new  “magic eyepiece” we headed straight for the Horsehead, just visible, the flame slightly more so above. We were using a TEC160 on a goto panther mount, with 55mm plossl and the TNVC adapter to the intensifier, using  a 6nm hydrogen alpha filter to “help”. The gain control worked really well to tune the balance of brightness (and noise) vs detail. The “white phosphor” giving a very neutral and “natural” view.
      Right, where next? Up to the jellyfish ic443, nice gentle curve easily visible, checked on the monkeyhead nearby. We then cruised down to the seagull which filled the view and then tried to ferret out the medusa Nebula… it evaded us this time. Swept over the the pacman, the heart and then the California nebula. The latter as two broad nebulous bands crossing the field of view. We need to try a smaller scope to give a bigger field of view for these really big nebulae.
      Swapped in a longpass filter and checked on M35 which looked great, M3? and then M81/82, very clear dark lane in the latter.. Clouds finally made a return and we packed up the wrong side of 1am, feet nearly frozen solid. Seemed like many of the streetlights had turned off as well, which is interesting to note. Going to be fun to poke this setup at nebulae when the skies are a little bit more conducive to observing.
      PeterW
       
    • By markarian
      Supermoon in all its colourful glory
      C80ED f7.5 Canon 600D
      22:08 UT 3 Dec 2017 99.9%
      Processed in Lightroom
       

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.