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So last night at 8:10 PM I decided to point my telescope to Alpha Piscium to start star hopping to Ceres. I hopped through a few 7th magnitude stars until I came across 3 stars in a crooked line. The one on top of this line was Ceres. I decided to show my Father, since he always wanted to see an asteroid with his own eyes so why not show him the biggest? At magnitude +7.6 it isn't at it's brightest but its magnitude is slowly rising back up to 8th magnitude so it's now a good time to observe it!

 

The first image is exactly what I seen through my telescope ( Celestron 114 LCM 4.5 inch reflector) using Stellarium's optical view and the other images are just highlighting where Ceres is.

I enjoyed looking at Ceres and I can't wait to watch it's path across Cetus! Clear skies!

2016-06-11--12-13-12.jpeg

2016-06-11--12-14-16.jpeg

2016-06-11--12-15-38.jpeg

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I keep intending to give Ceres a try but for some reason I keep forgetting about it when I get outside :happy6:

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excellently reported. Even thought they didn't look much, I recall following vesta & ceres in 2014. its not always what you actual see, its more what it represents.

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Hi bunnygod1, thanks! Ceres is quite hard to see as a disc at 0.6 arc seconds ( Neptune is 2.3 arc seconds currently ) But like you said it's about what it represents not how it looks.

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Was able to see Ceres for the first time last night. In my 7" refractor I could be convinced that the Airy disc is a fraction bigger than that of an 8th magnitude star nearby. To my eye it has a slightly blueish hue. 

 

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On 12/5/2016 at 11:17, timwetherell said:

Was able to see Ceres for the first time last night. In my 7" refractor I could be convinced that the Airy disc is a fraction bigger than that of an 8th magnitude star nearby. To my eye it has a slightly blueish hue. 

 

Hello Tim, I think it appears blue because of the Earth's atmosphere. I just got a white dot in my 4.5" reflector.

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