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My first ever shot at astrophotography!


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Well, I have finally got my head around recording and stacking tonight and since it was a crisp, clear sky and a beautiful Waxing Crescent Moon shining out my window I decided to take my new Neximage Burst put it in my Celestron 114 LCM and headed out to my garden with my all my necessary equipment with me. I followed a great tutorial on how iCap and Registax worked and used these tutorials to record the Moon.  When the recording was done I stacked and processed the recording using Registax and when the final outcome came I was shocked how good it looked to me.

Maybe to you professional astrophotographers it may look very poor. But for a first timer it isn't that bad right? I am proud of it and hopefully it will be first of many for me! I can't wait till Venus rises up so I can practice on an actual planet. Though I am aware of the way Venus's atmosphere is extremely reflective with the amount of CO2 in in it's atmosphere and nearly every image turns white. But having a timelapse of photos of it's phases would be pretty cool. But before I go onto Venus I am definitely going to practice on the Moon.

 

A budding astronomer

moon1 processed.bmp

Edited by A budding astronomer
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Congratulations on your first image, the fact that you have got everything working and a finished image is always worth the effort.

One bit of advice is try lowering your exposure and gain settings.
Get the brightest part of the moon into view and set the exposure for that. I normally try and set exposure to between 70 - 80%

Well done and keep them coming
 

 

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Well done, keep this in a special folder on your computer and keep adding pictures every month. This is such a steep learning curve, but it's so much fun and the sense of achievement with every little improvement is so rewarding. I am just a total beginner with Astro photography and a word of advice is to set your expectations. I realise with my current set up,time, and budget, I will never achieve what some can on here, but I can still enjoy showing off pictures to friends and family. 

Keep going. 

Edited by Peco4321
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  • 2 weeks later...

That sounds a very sucessful evening to have all the gear work on first use and come away with an image of the Moon, well done.

 

On 06/11/2016 at 01:54, WestCoastCannuck said:

Sweet!  Just started myself - though with a dslr/lens combo which limits me to the moon.

 

I look forward to following your progress! :)

Using a dslr and camera lens opens up doing great wide field images. Depending on the focal length of the lens you may get anything from 25 down to 3 seconds exposure length if using a static tripod. Take many images and then stack them using Deep Sky Stacker.

Edited by happy-kat
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And for future reference you need to save a version of your image in either PNG or JPG format to use here on SGL so that it will be automatically displayed in your post ... :icon_biggrin:

I for one do not like having to download unknown files in order to see an image ... :happy8:

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9 hours ago, happy-kat said:

Using a dslr and camera lens opens up doing great wide field images. Depending on the focal length of the lens you may get anything from 25 down to 3 seconds exposure length if using a static tripod. Take many images and then stack them using Deep Sky Stacker.

Thanks for suggestion!  I am intending to try that out.  I have a Zeiss 135mm F1.8  that I want to try out on the sky.....   just need to find the time, and the place. :)

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