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Neptune - we need a bigger boat - scope


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It was clear here last night (hard to believe I know) so I had a go at Neptune with the C9.25 and ASI224 with 2.5 Powermate.

Of course Neptune is really low in the sky and the outermost planet but ....

I think that it needs a bigger boat scope.

Peter

Neptune221016.png

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Good catch. Neptune is in hiding behind trees, but I am not sure my C8 could produce anything really nice. Bigger scopes are indeed called for. Aperture fever strikes again. Maybe I can have a go with the 16" RC in the dome on the roof of our university building. It is plagued by bad dome seeing until 01:00 AM, but it might provide better shots

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Likewise Chris, I was out last night trying to find Neptune even with my goto mount (3 star aligned) and still struggled to work out if it was in the FOV..... Then the clouds came in.

I'm eager to capture Neptune (even if it's a blue dot half the size of Peter's image) as this is the only planet I have yet to capture. Well done Peter!

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Nice image. Well done. :) Was observing Neptune the other night with my ST120 'frac, and also my Starwave 102 a few nights before that, although I found it pretty easily on my Goto mount. 

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Thanks all. The image is a bit underwhelming but it was the challenge of actually imaging it really. I don't think that I could have got it without my flip mirror. The only planet that I have not captured is Mercury and it's always too low for me here.

Peter

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I must admit I cheated a bit with Mercury as I imaged it when it was in transit passing over the Sun last year. The small black dot at the top is Mercury and some sunspots below. I've not tried to attempt it since but I will try Neptune again as my next target the next time the skies are clear whenever that will be....
 I think I may have to purchase a flip mirror too as it's so frustrating trying swapping the camera with the eyepiece and re-focusing it and visa-versa....It's not so bad with bright objects like the Moon and Jupiter but not so easy with fainter objects.

Transit of Mercury090516.jpg

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38 minutes ago, mikeonnet said:

I must admit I cheated a bit with Mercury as I imaged it when it was in transit passing over the Sun last year. The small black dot at the top is Mercury and some sunspots below. I've not tried to attempt it since but I will try Neptune again as my next target the next time the skies are clear whenever that will be....
 I think I may have to purchase a flip mirror too as it's so frustrating trying swapping the camera with the eyepiece and re-focusing it and visa-versa....It's not so bad with bright objects like the Moon and Jupiter but not so easy with fainter objects.

Transit of Mercury090516.jpg

that how I cheated on my Mercury images

Does it really count tho'?

LOL

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