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NGC891

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NGC 891 Imaged last night under a Moon of 70%.
No filteration used.
127mm triplet, Atik 428Ex and a AZEQ6 mount that still needs adjustment in PA... 
Total exposure is 92 minutes
7 x 10min subs
2 x 5min subs
3 x 4min subs
20 x 10min Darks
65 x Offsets.
No Flats.... light box project underway! :)
Well i'm happy enough with the result. I've hardly touched it post stacking.
Hope you like..

891db.jpg

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Looks like good data to me :)  Another faint fuzzy on the LH side too. A bit of de-convolution or un-sharp masking with the stars masked out will get you more detail I think..

ChrisH

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Cheers guys! :)

Chris, I really need to get my hands on a few more up-to-date programs and read about de-convolution..... i must confess to being a bit ignorant on such things. Watch this space.... excuse the pun :)

 

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Very nice NGC891! I like this Galaxy it´s one of my favourites, I like the dust lanes.

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Cheers Neil :)

Yeah they are Paddy, still gotta address some alignment issues... Just happy to be back imaging after a big chunk of time where i wasn't able to.

I've so much to learn again that a few errors in alignment are low in my list of priorities. I've gotta get comfortable with new software, learn processes I didn't even know about, build gadgets to help capture flats... and the list goes on :):) 

 

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