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I get some good views of the moon with my 8x42s, showing some good detail, you've got more magnification and bigger aperture, so it'll look great. You should be able to get a few DSOs too :)

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Hello and welcome to the forum :icon_biggrin:

The view posted above is about right. You will maximise the detail you can pick out if you can mount the binoculars on a tripod or similar support.

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24 minutes ago, Mubashir said:

Can craters also be seen as sharp view?

 

The larger craters will be visible, as per the image that Steve Ward has posted above. If the seeing conditions are steady they will be quite crisp but mounting the binoculars steadily on something will make them crisper.

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If the object is not too high I find sitting in a car with the binoculars resting on a partly opened window offers a good cheap support. Altitude can be adjusted by moving the window up or down as needed. It really does make a lot of difference to what you can see by supporting your bins

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All great advice and a really clear helpful graphic from Steve.

But while you're having a look see at the Moon ( a beautiful sight but don't forget some form of lunar atlas so you can know what you're lookin' at!), also check out some other Binocular Beauties: the gorgeous Pleiades star group; M44 the Beehive cluster and - a little bit harder to find if you live in a city like me - the Great Cluster M13 in the constellation Hercules - thousands of stars all cooped up in a splendid ball of light ( grey light, but hey....)

And that's just only four glories your bins will open up to you. Enjoy!

Edited by ghostdance
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Viewing the moon with binocs is what got me going with telescopes - I was awestruck by what you can see with a simple pair of 10x50's and just wanted more.

Couple of tips - it's very bright and can be tiring on the eyes - best to view when the phase is half or crescent. Look along the terminator and all the shadows help to discern various features - you can even see features inside craters by the shadows cast. It's also good looking along the limb - if you're lucky you'll even pick out some relief. As always - view when it's high in the sky on a dark, clear night with good transparency, from a dark observing location for best results.

As mentioned above - there are many dso's which are often better viewed with bins than with a scope. Hth :)

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1 hour ago, brantuk said:

- view when it's high in the sky on a dark, clear night with good transparency, from a dark observing location for best results.

 

Kim. It's the moon mate. You can view it from piccadilly circus if you want. ;):) 

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29 minutes ago, swamp thing said:

Kim. It's the moon mate. You can view it from piccadilly circus if you want. ;):) 

Except that you will atract all sorts of weirdos and probably get your wallet nicked whilst enjoying the view!!

Although, being in Pakistan, you are unlikely to be viewing from a central London interchange!

Stability is key. Leaning on an upturned broom is a popular method. I find that Monopod's work better than tripods.

There are loads more targets up there that will require more darkness.

Paul

Edited by Paul73
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9 minutes ago, swamp thing said:

Kim. It's the moon mate. You can view it from piccadilly circus if you want. ;):) 

Surely can Steve :)

A darker background though does give a sharper contrast especially on the limb - I've noticed it particularly with a thin crescent in my 15x70's. And the moon can be very pale as it turns from bright daylight through dusk into darkness when it's much sharper - so there is a range of viewing conditions to think about imho. :)

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24 minutes ago, Paul73 said:

Except that you will atract all sorts of weirdos and probably get your wallet nicked whilst enjoying the view!!

Although, being in Pakistan, you are unlikely to be viewing from a central London interchange!

 

Paul

Fair comment, there are plenty of dips around there at night. 

I'm not in Pakistan though Paul not sure that  Kim is either. :p 

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Hello Mubashir.

I agree with many of the posts above: through 12x60 binoculars you can certainly see craters on the Moon, especially if you stabilise your binoculars. A monopod or tripod will make a big difference. A magnification of 12 times is pretty high and without a proper support the Moon will shake about substantially.

Less expensive than a monopod is a flat mop. Sit on a stool or chair, rest the binoculars on the mop's head and rest the mop's stick on the floor. This way you won't get tired from holding the binoculars above your head, and you'll add a lot of stability at the same time.

FlatMop.gif

 

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I like to use the bino's with an adjustable patio lounge chair that allows for some blankets and a pillow to be used as well. When the weather is cold in the fall and spring or even winter I'll use this method instead of using telescopes. It's easy to support the knocks when lying flat or reclined and if you nod off the bino's never go far... Craters on the moon, no problem my smallest bino's 10x50 I can make out clould band's on Jupiter and it's moons the andromeda galaxy and the list goes on. If the moons too bright fold the eyecups back and slip on some sunglasses relax and enjoy. Bino's are the best grab n go scopes ever...for sure.

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23 hours ago, ghostdance said:

I work in Oxford St - I'll take me ST80 to Piccadilly tomorrow after I finish........er, maybe :D

I'll see you there - I work in Whitehall and often take my C8 for a quick dso session in Trafalgar Square on the way home. Don't mind trying Piccadilly instead - am sure the skies will be just as dark ?

Edited by Highburymark
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2 hours ago, Highburymark said:

I'll see you there - I work in Whitehall and often take my C8 for a quick dso session in Trafalgar Square on the way home. Don't mind trying Piccadilly instead - am sure the skies will be just as dark ?

Heh....well, Baker Street Irregulars use Regents Park. Hang on, that's only a shortish walk from my work. Hmm...possibilities! 

Or how about St James' Park, Mark. Hey, I'm a poet.... :D

Edited by ghostdance
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