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Wide angle Veil in bicolor - 12 hours exposure with QHY5L-II-M


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The veil Nebula, one of my favorites! I've previously captures this one, but felt i had a lot to improve.
This is another attempt on capturing it and consist of a good mix of data captured over several nights. Finally i feel like i'm starting to get somewhere with this target! :)

It's all captured with the QHY5L-II-M camera, unguided with a 50mm F/1.8 and a 135mm F/3.5 lens. Both are old manual Olympus OM lenses.

Exposure:
10x 10 min OIII - 50mm F/1.8 (edit: F/2.8, not 1.8)
15x 10 min Ha - 50mm F/1.8 (edit: F/2.8, not 1.8)
4-part mosaic, total 254x 2 min Ha - 135mm F/3.5

Total exposure is 12 hours 38 minutes. Mainly it's Ha exposure though, and i'm looking forward to capturing more OIII as well at a longer focal length - but for now i'm really happy with the result! :)

 

veil bi-color verson 3 akam-sgl-print.jpg

Edited by Jannis
10x 10 min OIII - 50mm F/1.8 (edit: F/2.8, not 1.8) 15x 10 min Ha - 50mm F/1.8 (edit: F/2.8, not 1.8)
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That's an amazing result from a QHY5L-II-M. What capture software and adapters did you use? I have the same camer that I only ever use for guiding. As I have a couple of lenses kicking around, I might kit it out for wide field too. Especially if I can get an image like that with it. Any tips would be appreciated. 

Edited by Maximidius
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Thanks guys! :)

I forgot to mention, that over half of the subs are taken during the full moon.
I honestly never expected to make this kind of pictures from a cheap planetary/guide-camera. It opens up a whole new area for me, and it also enables me to capture while it's slightly windy. 

Maximidius, i use APT for capturing as i found it most easy to use. Only issue i have is that, regardless what computer i use, if i change the camera settings (gain for example), i need not only to reconnect the camera from APT, but restart the program completly. Camera works without restarting, but new settings are not taken into use. However this also goes for PHD/PHD2, so it might be an ASCOM iussue, i don't know? Either way, changing settings and restart program always works. :)

As for the setup, with the QHY5L-II-M i use a c-mount to EF adapter, and then again a OM to EF adapter. This way i can use both my old (very old, from 70-80's) Olympus OM lenses and my Canon EF and EFs lenses. 
I'm using a homemade dew-heater that i simply tape onto whichever lens i decide to use for the night.
A homemade peltier cooler for the QHY5L-II also helps lowering the camera temp by ~12-15c (it can cool much more, but at a low power i exclude any vibrations from teh cooling fan).

I use standard 2" Ha and OIII filters in front of the lens with step-down rings. Be awere if you don't capture narrowband you will want a UV/IR block filter in front of the lens as you won't be able to attach the 1,25" filter between the camera and the lens adapter. 

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