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So far the start of fall has given some great skies, I have been observing most every night focusing on a few favorites including the Crescent nebula. This object shows some really nice detail at times and tonight when panning minutely around it I noticed a shade edge nearby... this immediately grabbed my attention and became the target of the night and turns out to be LBN 208. The 30mm ES 82/OIII/15" dob presented this object in direct vision once I had found it and is approx 1 deg away, or a bit less, opposite from the Crescents bright triangle of stars and so far shows oblong- more FOV would be an asset. I can't believe I didn't notice this object before.

The sky mag is 21.8, NELM 6.8 and with above avg transparency. I must add that the NELM stars used were in Ursa Minor and that the mag 6.3 HIP 79420 is my usual target and tonight it showed easily in direct vision. Inspired I then rolled my eye around the area trying to get any "flicks" popping into view- and doing so HIP 77942 was caught at mag 6.8, my best yet. Cupping my hands around the eyes seemed to help.

All in all a great night and before I forget...the Veils thin thread might not be so thin...

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on CN someone did an image of this....I can see a monster with two orange eyes!....swampthing uses a cardboard tube Gerry, it works!

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A great night out by the sounds Gerry :hello: Keep up the good work. We seem to be having some very decent skies at the moment in Northants but nothing like those you have :happy11:

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WE SHOULD COME VISIT GERRY!!!!! xDDDDD

Your skies must be amazing... Well I guess I'm not too bad either. I can spot the two bottom stars Ursa Minor on a good night with averted vision :eek::eek: The rectangle's two botom stars....

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Awesome Gerry.... and 21.8, just trying to decide whether to take a gamble on the not so great weather forecast for tonight, should I stay or should I go.

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10 minutes ago, scarp15 said:

Awesome Gerry.... and 21.8, just trying to decide whether to take a gamble on the not so great weather forecast for tonight, should I stay or should I go.

Go... even the chance of observing is worth the trip in my books, looking forward to your report Iain!

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We could really do with a decent deep image with catalogued objects in it.... It's difficult to know exactly which little fuzzy filamenty bit we're seeing and talking about.

 

cheers

 

peter

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1 hour ago, PeterW said:

We could really do with a decent deep image with catalogued objects in it.... It's difficult to know exactly which little fuzzy filamenty bit we're seeing and talking about.

 

cheers

 

peter

I'm all for that one!

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Have to find a way to index and add outlines to existing images. I've looked at the sharpless catalog, but looks like time to look at LBN too. I have used previously used several online images and colour inverted wikisky images.. Red becomes blue, black becomes white... Which gives a nice black on white view when illuminated with astrotorches.

What we want is to add catalog outlines to them so we have a common language to help the "dos you see that wisp?"!

(only looking at areas with good nebulosity as most of the sky is nebula blank, and someone else can do the sky below Canis major round to Sagittarius!!)

cheers

 

peter

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17 minutes ago, PeterW said:

Have to find a way to index and add outlines to existing images. I've looked at the sharpless catalog, but looks like time to look at LBN too. I have used previously used several online images and colour inverted wikisky images.. Red becomes blue, black becomes white... Which gives a nice black on white view when illuminated with astrotorches.

What we want is to add catalog outlines to them so we have a common language to help the "dos you see that wisp?"!

(only looking at areas with good nebulosity as most of the sky is nebula blank, and someone else can do the sky below Canis major round to Sagittarius!!)

cheers

 

peter

Yes, a good detailed set of image maps is a must, with outlines as you say. In my next post I'll show the neb seen, with permission from the imager.

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I noticed an excellent image of the Crescent nebula and also LBN 208 in the imaging section. This image shows the portion of the Crescent that can be seen with no filter- as bright red right in the triangle of stars. It shows as a faint, but distinct streak with no filter. Next to Crescent is the nebula I observed- this is very faint but direct vision shows it. As said, so far it looks oblong as I traced its outline in the 15" and swept across its width. The filter slide is a huge asset as flipping back and forth from no filter to filtered can trigger the eyes to pick things up, allowing a "lock on".

I use the Crescent as a sky/eye test - when that streak can be seen unfiltered it's time for some serious hunting.

Many thanks to konstantinos75 for his permission to use this great image of the Crescent neb and area. This image is an excellent resource for those who want to pick up the faint LBN208.

 

 

konstantinos75 lbn208.jpg

Edited by jetstream
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Aha, one on the edge of the "gamma Cygnus" area.... One area that we really need some help with!! Shows in Reiner vogels Cygnus overview page Sharpless_Cygnus_big.jpg

cheers

peter

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VG map- actually it shows what I might have caught over from the western Veil- a small patch of nebulosity that has been distracting me as I pan around the area- I repeatedly see this and had no clue as to what is was. It looks to be SH2-102. I'll check Vogels charts now that you gave me a clue to its identity. Thanks Peter.

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Just checked it- he says visible in Hb but I see a patch in OIII... I'll have to sketch out the stars now, which I find to be a very time consuming (time wasting) process.

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