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The latest edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. The nights are getting longer so, as well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have:

    * Several lunar occultations, including a (somewhat tricky) graze of HIP 38975 for observers in Eire and the north of England
    * Uranus and Neptune are now observable in the evening (as well as the morning)
    * Ceres and Vesta are difficult, but back!
    * A mini-review of the Levenhuk Sherman PRO 10x50 binocular

To grab your (free!) copy, or to subscribe, log on to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab

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Just noted that the when I press on the current issue for your newsletter it comes up with the July 2016 edition. To see the actually current edition for August 2016 I need to go into newsletter archive! 

Edited by Knighty2112
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Thanks Steve, I need to pull my finger out as I've not used my bins in a couple of months! 

Also just to second the above comment, you need to click on archive to see Augusts issue.

Much Appreciation for your efforts each month :) 

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2 hours ago, Knighty2112 said:

Just noted that the when I press on the current issue for your newsletter it comes up with the July 2016 edition.

Oops. Drat. Fixed. Thanks.

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Thanks Steve! I'm guilty of neglecting my binoculars a bit since getting my scope, but have been getting back into them recently. So easy to use and they open up a different set of targets. Looking forwards to seeing Eddie's Coaster - never heard of it until now! :-)

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