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steppenwolf

IC 5070 - The Pelican Nebula - a disappointing night

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I didn't think I'd ever see such a thing - a full Moon and cloud sweeping in! No, I tell you, it really did happen last night .......... So, my 20 subframe session on the Pelican Nebula turned into a misty 8 subframes before all the stars disappeared from view under heavy clouds. Worse was to come, image 6 was also totally clouded out leaving me with just 7 x 600 sec. Ha sub-frames to work with.

On the plus side, my new focusing system worked flawlessly :cool2:

Camera: QSI 683 WSG-8

Filter: Baader Ha 8nm

Telescope: William Optics FLT98 with WO FR IV reducer/flattener

Mount: Mesu 200

Session Control: CCD Commander

Stacked with MaxIM DL and finished in PhotoShop PS3

IC 5070 The Pelican Nebula

IC5070.png

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Still doesn't look too shabby Steve :) 

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Fantastic work even under a full moon and cloud. Thanks for the image, Steve!

 

Reggie

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I think that;'s looking really nice Steve - Well processed and great detail showing :)

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Something is most definitely better than nothing! That's a lovely Pelican.

You don't say what the new focussing system is - please do share.

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You don't say what the new focussing system is - please do share.

Hi Gav, sorry, I mentioned this in a couple of other threads but why would you know that!!

I have for now booted FocusMax into touch as it was failing and ending sessions in their tracks so I am currently using SharpStar which is a routine already built in to MaxIM DL and it has so far proved to be 100% reliable although it won't focus through completely overcast skies :icon_biggrin::evil4: Its only minor downside is the need to choose a suitable star to focus on manually whereas FocusMax does this automatically but it is easy to automate this once the star is chosen - I am slowly building up a library with object/star pairings for use in subsequent sessions.

Thanks for your comments folks, all I need now is some clear nights to complete the Ha collection and then I'm going for some OIII for a bi-colour to complete it.

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22 hours ago, steppenwolf said:

Hi Gav, sorry, I mentioned this in a couple of other threads but why would you know that!!

I have for now booted FocusMax into touch as it was failing and ending sessions in their tracks so I am currently using SharpStar which is a routine already built in to MaxIM DL and it has so far proved to be 100% reliable although it won't focus through completely overcast skies :icon_biggrin::evil4: Its only minor downside is the need to choose a suitable star to focus on manually whereas FocusMax does this automatically but it is easy to automate this once the star is chosen - I am slowly building up a library with object/star pairings for use in subsequent sessions.

Thanks for your comments folks, all I need now is some clear nights to complete the Ha collection and then I'm going for some OIII for a bi-colour to complete it.

Thank you for the details Steve. One other question - what hardware do you use for auto focus? Sorry - 'nobody expects The Spanish Inquisition' - auto focus is very much the next thing on my list of upgrades, so I am keen to glean as much detail as possible!

Good luck with the continuation of the Pelican project. At least we are now moving back towards proper dark skies.

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Great image considering the conditions and small amount of data - good processing :)

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what hardware do you use for auto focus?

I decided to go out on a limb a little with this as although a very popular choice is the Lakeside focuser, I was really taken with the design of the SharpSky system originally designed by Dave Trewren as a DIY project but now available as a finished product. I have absolutely no regrets about this choice as Dave is a pleasure to deal with and the focus issues that I have had have all been down to software, not the SharpSky hardware, which is impeccably built and totally reliable.

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2 hours ago, steppenwolf said:

I decided to go out on a limb a little with this as although a very popular choice is the Lakeside focuser, I was really taken with the design of the SharpSky system originally designed by Dave Trewren as a DIY project but now available as a finished product. I have absolutely no regrets about this choice as Dave is a pleasure to deal with and the focus issues that I have had have all been down to software, not the SharpSky hardware, which is impeccably built and totally reliable.

That's excellent, thank you for the info and the link.

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For beginners to deep sky imaging, here is proof positive that more subframes equals better images! The night of 20th July proved much clearer than the 19th and despite the Moon being just one day past full, I managed to capture a new sequence of 20 x 600 second subframes and what a difference this made to signal to noise ratio and detail. This is most apparent in the Herbig-Haro jets emanating from the top of the dust and gas pillar at the back of the Pelican's 'head'. These jets indicate the presence of an unseen proto-star. These jets carry the designation HH-555.

IC5070_200716.png

 

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An even more impressive image Steve !

I find it quite amazing what you can acquire in the presence of a nearly full moon, without any noticeable reduction in image quality.

Alan  

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I find it quite amazing what you can acquire in the presence of a nearly full moon, without any noticeable reduction in image quality.

Hydrogen Alpha filters are great under these conditions, even my relatively wide 8nm. I feel these days that with the weather being so poor in the UK, you have to take every opportunity and luckily, I rather like mono images. That said, I am programmed up and ready to capture OIII for this image and my previous NGC7000 on the next pair of clear nights!

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That's now a super image. It has all the boxes firmly ticked.

Olly

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Looking even better Steve!

What I really love about this target is that if you tilt your head 90º to the left, the nebula is no longer a pelican, but becomes a smiling hare! Or is it a long eared rabbit? :biggrin:

 

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Those extra frames are making a world of difference - as you said more is best (to a point).

Very nice work given the pesky moon - well done.

Paddy

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Thanks for your comments, folks.

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as you said more is best (to a point).

For me, that point seems to be between 25 and 30 frames but other people's mileage may differ!

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