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Sorry to hear the plan has not worked for you.

Thanks for sharing the why with us all as we can learn from this issue you have found.

Roll off sounds the way to go, I share your thoughts on how it looks, but sometimes function over aesthetic is needed.

Look forward to the Mark 2 pictures in the summer.

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Those of us old enough to remember Benny Hill might find this amusing - I did but then again small things and small minds....... This at real life speed with the weather we are having - clear - r

It can be done ...... https://www.flickr.com/photos/113316085@N05/albums/72157663274320360    

Same here.  I too like trying unconventional ideas and also some of these fail but it's this sort of attitude that leads to advances in science and engineering   Good luck with your second build

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Same here.  I too like trying unconventional ideas and also some of these fail but it's this sort of attitude that leads to advances in science and engineering :)  Good luck with your second build :)

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I think for a mini obsy the hinged design is in fact optimal especially if using German hinges as Skipper Billy used. Once you are getting higher walls and heavier roof panels then you need to be using a roll off roof design. 

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I'm planning on building a folding-roof observatory behind my garage.  I'm quite limited for space (around 2mx2m), but it does provide good dark views to the south and east.  In theory (!) the roof  will push up to fold in the middle, then latch against my garage wall.  I think I can make use of continuous PVC hinges to keep it all watertight.  Assuming I decide it is all possible, I'll start a build thread.

 

20170514_174104.jpg

Plan.png

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On ‎12‎/‎07‎/‎2016 at 20:41, Skipper Billy said:

Hi David, sorry to resurect an old post.... The problem getting the split roof to seal, how did you get round that? I am planning a small obs build just now and still to finalise my roof design, yours looks great.

Cheers, Gary

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Hello Gary

I will take some photos when it stops raining - much easier than trying to explain in words.

Its not difficult and even during biblical rain and high winds (like today!) it is bone dry.

All the best.

David.

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David

What size is your observatory? I need to downsize mine and now seems a good time as the roof needs replacing. Yours seems perfect, especially how the roof opens!!

Thanks to Gary for reinvigorating this thread and highlighting your set-up!

Kind regards

David

 

 

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16 minutes ago, Peakedge said:

What size is your observatory?

It's about 1400mm sq - if it ever stops raining I will take some photos and measurements.

It nearly stopped this morning but then decided to carry on again! 😉 

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On 16/01/2021 at 22:31, Skipper Billy said:

Hello Gary

I will take some photos when it stops raining - much easier than trying to explain in words.

Its not difficult and even during biblical rain and high winds (like today!) it is bone dry.

All the best.

David.

Thanks David

 

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OK - the external measurements are .....

External 1500mm x 1500mm 

Height to top of door (exc roof) 1300mm

Internal 1400mm x 1400 x 1300mm

The inverted V shaped strip across the join in the roof halves is fixed and sealed to one of the roof halves (the side that faces the prevailing wind). The seal between this capping strip and the other half of the roof is sealed with a strip of butyl weatherproof non adhesive (one one side!) tape. The half that the capping strip is permanently fastened to must always be opened first and closed last.

Hope the following photos and brief (amateur!) video help.

Fire away with any questions and I will do my best to assist.

20210118_124131.jpg

 

20210118_124034.jpg

20210118_124044.jpg

20210118_124125.jpg

Edited by Skipper Billy
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2 hours ago, Skipper Billy said:

OK - the external measurements are .....

External 1500mm x 1500mm 

Height to top of door (exc roof) 1300mm

Internal 1400mm x 1400 x 1300mm

The inverted V shaped strip across the join in the roof halves is fixed and sealed to one of the roof halves (the side that faces the prevailing wind). The seal between this capping strip and the other half of the roof is sealed with a strip of butyl weatherproof non adhesive (one one side!) tape. The half that the capping strip is permanently fastened to must always be opened first and closed last.

Hope the following photos and brief (amateur!) video help.

Fire away with any questions and I will do my best to assist.

20210118_124131.jpg

 

20210118_124034.jpg

20210118_124044.jpg

20210118_124125.jpg

Thanks David. I suspected that was the design, nice to see it works. I'll be building my micro obs this year and still pondering a few different roof designs.

 

Gary

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Those of us old enough to remember Benny Hill might find this amusing - I did but then again small things and small minds.......

This at real life speed with the weather we are having - clear - raining - clear - raining - clear - raining .......

 

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David

All this detail is amazing and guess I know how I'm doing my roof now. I particularly like the Benny Hill music on the second video. That show is a fond memory from my youth, probably never to be repeated!

I was going to ask how the roof stays on but guess that is the pivoting arms that do that! What is the roofing material?

 

David

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7 minutes ago, Peakedge said:

I was going to ask how the roof stays on but guess that is the pivoting arms that do that! What is the roofing material?

Yes, the arms effectively lock the roof down against high winds as well as acting a a pivot and guide.  We have had winds of >100mph and biblical rain and snow and it has never let a drop of water in.

The roofing material is 'EPDM' - https://www.rubber4roofs.co.uk/shop/epdm-rubber-roofing

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