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Nigel G

Is our Universe 13.7 billion years old ? I'm not quite convinced

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I think the thing you are missing is that the speed of light is constant, regardless of where or when you are and how fast you are moving relative to other places and things.

Once you get your head around that it's easy :wink:

 

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13 minutes ago, Nigel G said:

Are the photons of light from Andromeda taking 2.5 million years to get here?

According to our clocks yes, according to the clock on board the photon no just a blink of an eye. There is our time, photon time and time for a Jura, agreed !

Did you know that the rocks of Jura are about 20times older than the light from Andromeda

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When Chewy was helming the Millennium Falcon at light speed they new exactly how long to go, and stop in the right place, they also had time to teach Luke the ways of the force ( dark matter )  ? 

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5 minutes ago, DRT said:

I think the thing you are missing is that the speed of light is constant, regardless of where or when you are and how fast you are moving relative to other places and things.

Once you get your head around that it's easy :wink:

 

I thought light travels at different speeds depending on wave length 

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Shhhhh, you'll wake up meteoric/fossilized Paul and his storm troopers :)

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1 minute ago, Nigel G said:

I thought light travels at different speeds depending on wave length 

I thought I had run out of Talisker, but I just found another bottle in the cupboard :grin:

 

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3 minutes ago, SilverAstro said:

 

Did you know that the rocks of Jura are about 20times older than the light from Andromeda :hello2:

Yes I did ?

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1 minute ago, Nigel G said:

I thought light travels at different speeds depending on wave length 

not in free space it doesnt, only in a refractive medium like glass.

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9 minutes ago, DRT said:

I think the thing you are missing is that the speed of light is constant 

 

I see yes ignore my last quote ☺

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15 minutes ago, Nigel G said:

Are the photons of light from Andromeda taking 2.5 million years to get here? Or are they instant, are we not seeing it as it was 2.5 m y ago. 

This one has me slightly confused. :happy6: Must be time for a Jura 

It is instant from their point of view, and the only reason I understand this is thanks to a double Laphroaig :happy11:

1 hour ago, Alien 13 said:

and everything else is just an illusion/hologram.

Alan 

 I tried to understand the holographic principle in detail and failed. More Laphroaig required. 

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I would like to point out that I'm not making fun of physics and science, I'm having fun learning. ☺

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Just now, Nigel G said:

I would like to point out that I'm not making fun of physics and science, I'm having fun learning. ☺

That's the way to do it, this thread, whilst immensely entertaining has also made me think about some things I've never thought about before, most engaging.

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1 minute ago, Nigel G said:

I would like to point out that I'm not making fun of physics and science, I'm having fun learning. ☺

I would like to point out that all these damn fool interesting questions are keeping me from starting on this freebie bottle of Grant's,,,  heheee waves joke flag :)

6 minutes ago, johnfosteruk said:

I tried to understand the holographic principle in detail and failed. More Laphroaig required. 

Dont you mean the anthropic principle ?

If anyone wants to really boggle their mind then try reading up on information theory and how it maybe (or maybe not) lost in a black hole and StephenH on the holographic representation left on the event horizon of said black hole such that the information is not lost after all  , ,  a bit like the grin of the Cheshire Cat

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1 minute ago, SilverAstro said:

I would like to point out that all these damn fool interesting questions are keeping me from starting on this freebie bottle of Grant's,,,  heheee waves joke flag :)

Dont you mean the anthropic principle ?

If anyone wants to really boggle their mind then try reading up on information theory and how it maybe (or maybe not) lost in a black hole and StephenH on the holographic representation left on the event horizon of said black hole such that the information is not lost after all  , ,  a bit like the grin of the Cheshire Cat

The holographic principle is what I'm talking about, is that related to the anthropic principle? More whisky please.

The information theory bit is hawking radiation/hairy black holes isn't it? Hasn't that been proven (tentatively) recently

 

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5 minutes ago, johnfosteruk said:

The holographic principle is what I'm talking about, is that related to the anthropic principle? More whisky please.

The information theory bit is hawking radiation/hairy black holes isn't it? Hasn't that been proven (tentatively) recently

Pardon my little jest :) , the same thing as my cheshire cat. I did contemplate typing about the proposed hologram on the surface of the universe, but avoided doing so on the grounds that someone might come and compare us to living in a black hole, u c !

I think his hairy black hole has become quite widely accepted but not aware of it being proven, in fact last I read was doubt that the radiation intensity could ever be observed sufficiently above the noise of the quantum foam for it to become statistically significant ?? I feel the need of a strong glass , , ,

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Time for a brief question of mine : the business of Hawking radiation being observed above the noise, is that thought to have only been strong enough round small holes at the point of evaporation,  all of which have allredy had time to evaporate since the big bang. Or was it only going to be significant at a black hole so super massive that such was improbable to exist or maybe even more massive than the universe ?

 

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Oh dear

Having read through this I think it now needs the cask-strength Aberlour :eek:.

Where does that leave us on rotating (Kerr?) black holes? I thought they had toroidal singularities and event horizons?

 

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1 minute ago, SilverAstro said:

Time for a brief question of mine : the business of Hawking radiation being observed above the noise, is that thought to have only been strong enough round small holes at the point of evaporation,  all of which have allredy had time to evaporate since the big bang. Or was it only going to be significant at a black hole so super massive that such was improbable to exist or maybe even more massive than the universe ?

 

:happy6: no comment, 

only because I have no knowledge of this particular topic I'm afraid to say.  .I'm off to Jura in 3 weeks ☺better celebrate that with another dram

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If you could get into an orbit of a black hole then so I understand your apparent time slows down, achieving time travel into the future, the only trouble is you need to escape the gravitational pull other wise what's the point. Stuck in orbit of a black hole living for millions of years, boring. ?

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The photon expected from Andromeda will now not stop here on account of its brakes having failed, please wait another 4.5my

inspired by Mock the Week announcements,  hic!

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27 minutes ago, DaveS said:

I thought they had toroidal singularities and event horizons?

To be a toroid it would need to have a dimension or three ? Wouldnt that be an oxymoron, for a singularity ?

Edited by SilverAstro
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4 minutes ago, SilverAstro said:

To be a toroid it would need to have a dimension or three ? Wouldnt that be an oxymoron, for a singularity ?

Do you mean The Singleton?

I find the correlation between whisky lovers and those interested in space time quite interesting :smile:

 

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Ah, that is my mistake, this freebie is blended !

Nigel please take me with you to Jura, away from all this , , ,

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3 minutes ago, SilverAstro said:

Ah, that is my mistake, this freebie is blended !

Nigel please take me with you to Jura, away from all this , , ,

I sailed a yacht up to Jura 5 weeks ago, this trip is to bring the yacht back so if you like the high seas and drunken garble of yachties ☺. Unfortunately the crew get even more confused than me when it comes to universal theories. 

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