Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_31.thumb.jpg.b7a41d6a0fa4e315f57ea3e240acf140.jpg

Juno - Jupiter Orbital Insertion (US 4th July)


Recommended Posts

A mere enthusiast - But just noting this is due fairly soon! :)
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/main/index.html

Had thought the mission was essentially "blind" but then
was cheered to find out about the existance of "JunoCam"!

https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/media-gallery/instruments?show=fig_562e2fa248b496f704cf3f8a&m=179

Possibilities to download image data and upload your own
effort?!? (One for the "planetary imagers" and more?) ;)
https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/media-gallery/junocam

Edited by Macavity
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Stub Mandrel said:

I'm hoping Juno will give some really interesting results but folks don't seem to be getting excited.

That has surprised me too, particularly after the excitement that surrounded New Horizons' flyby of Pluto last year. Let's hope that going to Jupiter hasn't become as run-of-the-mill and uninteresting to the public as the latter Apollo missions to the Moon became :sad:

Can't wait to see some pictures and read about the science experiments!!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DRT said:

That has surprised me too, particularly after the excitement that surrounded New Horizons' flyby of Pluto last year. Let's hope that going to Jupiter hasn't become as run-of-the-mill and uninteresting to the public as the latter Apollo missions to the Moon became :sad:

Can't wait to see some pictures and read about the science experiments!!

I think the general public arent really that interested in the science of the missions but just like looking at the priddy pictures. Jupiter of course already has lots of priddy pics whereas Pluto was yet to be seen and of course still had a soft in the publics heart after its relegation. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I know its a long way off, but when Juno does finally take its last plunge will it be visible from earth? Or even the scars?

 

For that matter, would cassini make any visible impact on Saturn when it takes its final plunge, either with a visible flash or by leaving a Jupiter like scar? Have any scars been seen on Saturn??

 

Sorry.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What I find fascinating is that after launch it went out beyond the orbit of Mars, came back two years later, slingshotted past Earth at about 80000 mph and 300 miles distance and went off again. I know that computing the course is straightforward celestial mechanics to some but to me it's almost wizardry. p.s hope that insertion engine fires o.k.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't wait to see what comes back from the atmospheric studies and what that means for solar system formation etc etc. I shall be watching avidly and spreading encouragement to all non astro, science and enquiring mind types to do the same.

 

Also, eyes.nasa.gov, the eyes on the solar system app is showing the insertion, and handy playlist of all the video media for the mission at clicky

 

Edited by johnfosteruk
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not everything about my country makes me proud, but NASA certainly does. I worked for a short time on the Cassini mission and now I work for NOAA. It's good to see gov't (often maligned) accomplish something amazing.

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 03/07/2016 at 15:13, Stub Mandrel said:

I'm hoping Juno will give some really interesting results but folks don't seem to be getting excited.

I'm looking forward to some great images. I can see though why this mission hasnt appealed to the masses. Its because we (Humans) all think we know everything there is to know about the planet. We know its a gas giant, we know it has a huge storm raging on its "surface" for hundreds of years.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

I'm looking forward to some great images. I can see though why this mission hasnt appealed to the masses. Its because we (Humans) all think we know everything there is to know about the planet. We know its a gas giant, we know it has a huge storm raging on its "surface" for hundreds of years.

 

I find it quite sad, Paul. I also think it is a great example of why mankind does not yet have enough of a collective sense of responsibility to entitle us to land on and leave our mess on other worlds. We keep seeing sound bites about man going to Mars. How many days will they be there before the world loses interest and a few months later all that is left is a pile of toxic waste and a bunch of bacteria that shouldn't be there. Perhaps we should take better care of our own world rather than spoiling another one?

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, DRT said:

I find it quite sad, Paul. I also think it is a great example of why mankind does not yet have enough of a collective sense of responsibility to entitle us to land on and leave our mess on other worlds. We keep seeing sound bites about man going to Mars. How many days will they be there before the world loses interest and a few months later all that is left is a pile of toxic waste and a bunch of bacteria that shouldn't be there. Perhaps we should take better care of our own world rather than spoiling another one?

You can lead a horse to water but you cant make it drink. The truth is that just a tiny small % of people on this planet actually care about it and care even less about what is beyond it. I can respect that. There are a lot of things other people care about and are passionate about that i honestly never give a second thought to or about.

I think you are right though. Lets get this planet (our planet) in order before we even consider going to other planets. The Moon is already littered with man-made rubbish. Mars too. 

Wanna talk about space junk and man-made pollution in space?..............take a look at an image of just how much rubbish is orbiting our own planet.

The planet is starting to look like a Borg Sphere...or a Death Star: This is just an artists impression.

Spacedebris.jpg

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

"all that is left is a pile of toxic waste and a bunch of bacteria"

"truth is that just a tiny small % of people on this planet actually care about it"

Only a tiny % of people are free of having to scrape a living on/from toxic waste heaps and have the leisure time to set this world to rights, probably best not to contaminate a Juno thread like this ?

 

Edited by SilverAstro
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 7 months later...

I see (via Twitter!) that NASA won't be risking the change re. a
53 day orbit to a 14 day orbit. Uncertainty re. "pressurisation"
for engine burns? They seem upbeat re. ultimate objectives! :)

Just that the closest approaches won't be every two weeks.  :happy9:
I sense the range of lattitudes IMAGED will be more limited?
And (as many of us) they will have to face budget reviews...

See for example:

https://phys.org/news/2017-02-juno-current-orbit-jupiter.html

 

Edited by Macavity
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.