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Hi.  I'm new to all this, so I wasn't sure where to post this photo.  

 

Wondering what this object is...?  Have debunked the possibility of a lens flare thanks to photos taken before and after this one.  I have seen this strange object move from left to right, seemingly across the sun, on a couple of occasions now and am curious to see if anyone else has seen it or can identify what it is...  Thanks for any help.

image.jpeg

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It's a lens flare.
Just because it moves in different photos does'nt mean much.

Any really bright light will show the lens imperfections and they may not stay in the same place.

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Yes, that looks like a lens flare. These are caused by light reflecting to and fro between the lenses in the objective. When the Sun shines in from a different angle, the lens flares will be in different places.

Did you use a filter to give the Sun those side beams?

If you want to you can also show us the pictures which have the (probable) flare in different positions.

 

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Hi Nikki and welcome to SGL. Our membership has some very experienced photographers, so I am sure the answer they have given will be correct.

As you are just starting out, I am sure you will have a multitude of questions to ask before long, we will, of course, l be happy to help. Just post in the relevant section to which your question relates, in the meantime enjoy the forum :) 

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I think It's unanimous Nikki. Lens Flare has it.
Welcome to SGL, and now you know how quickly help arrives when asked for.
There is a veritable Library of knowledge residing here so don't be afraid to tap into it whenever
you need any assistance  :smiley:.

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By adjusting the brightness and contrast in the image, the 'object' you highlight is clearly polygonal (approximately octagonal), indicating the bokeh of the lens. Afraid it's not Planet X...

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12 hours ago, Ruud said:

Yes, that looks like a lens flare. These are caused by light reflecting to and fro between the lenses in the objective. When the Sun shines in from a different angle, the lens flares will be in different places.

Did you use a filter to give the Sun those side beams?

If you want to you can also show us the pictures which have the (probable) flare in different positions.

 

No sir.  No filters.  All my other lens flares were greenish and red in the photos before and after.  Hence why I was utterly curious.

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My aunt and uncle have gotten every into Planet X and thus, being me, I am curious.  Not a doubter, but not a full believer yet either.  The logical part of me wants more scientific proof, but the fearful of the unknown part of me is scared out of my wits...  So, I started taking pictures and such.  

 

Thank you you guys for taking the time to welcome me and answer my question without making me feel like a nut job.  I'm very interested in learning everything about everything, but since Nibiru has come into the picture, I've been extremely curious about it...  

 

It's like all science, I suppose.  Fascinating and frightening at the same time...

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Also, as asked for, these are the photos with obvious flares.  

The last two photos are the photos before and after the one I was questioning about.  

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Edited by Nikki Pain
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Hi there, first off welcome, "new myself" so I'm a real novice but iv read soooo much on this nibiru, iv even read sitchin's 12th planet to find out what the fuss was about and looked into all possibilities of it actually being there. most "almost all pics, vids etc on the net are fake straight up. But there are a few very very "wow" pics, vids that haven't and can't be debunked! All the "start of mankind" and the Sumerians and there advancement etc really do offer a plausible scientific reason on how we as humans so advanced got here on earth. If none here have read looked up on it do it, it's a very good read! Now I don't know what to believe, I'm not ruling it out but I also have my head screwed on, no one in astronomy has seen it yet? As coming up behind the sun? but surly a small solar system with 4-5 moons would cause havoc with other planets in our system before it got near and people here would surly notice big changes to locations, tilts etc from this opposing system. If "by the picture your showing" it was this close it would be causing untold destruction, pulling and throwing commits all over the show. 

Just my 2 pence.

its very interesting though so guys and girls check it out of you haven't 

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