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Hello,i'm gonna buy the skywatcher heritage 100p(dobsonian reflector).Many people say that one of the first things you need to do is to collimate your telescope even though you just received it.Please tell what to do is this necessary and how can i collimate my telescope easiy if needed?

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I would recommend that you purchase a collimation laser. I've found this to be an incredibly fast and easy way to colimate the scope  before each viewing session. 

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I agree, but you need to make sure that the laser itself is collimated.

try it first though, it was quite a while before I first did mine, I still got great views.

if you're worried about it, try and find a local club, there will be someone there now than willing to help.

 

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You at least need a Cheshire tool. Its really not that hard once you understand what you are looking at through the focuser. This video does a pretty good job of explaining what you'll need to know..

 

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If the scope is bought new, you shouldn't need to collimate it, it is usually collimated at the factory and should reach you in perfect condition.  Having said that collimation is a straight-forward task, but you will find that a small scope like the one you suggest does not easily loose collimation, so I shouldn't worry overmuch.

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I admit I am old school, but I really think there is no need for a laser collimator. Not only are they a bit expensive, but also, as already was pointed out, the collimator itself has to be collimated for good results. In any case, do not forget that with or without collimator, the only way to achieve perfect collimation is by means of a defocused star image, after rough collimation has been done visually. My suggestion is that you learn to do the steps from the wealth of books, forums, videos and internet articles (like this one: How To Align Your Newtonian Reflector Telescope) out there. It is more difficult with short focus telescopes, but it is not impossible, and definitely something anyone can learn with a bit of patience and dedication. Good luck!

Edited by Cinco Sauces
typo
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Hi astrojim01,

I have the Heritage 130p. I bought it before christmas last year. It still provides great views and looks collimated. You can do the star test first - you zoom in on a star, focus it and the slightly start to defocus. If the image is symmetrical all should be fine.

I also ordered one of the collimating lasers however, for when the time comes.

Cloudless nights to you all!

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I have a 130p and find it holds collimation well, just got a 200p-ds and needs collimating more often if not before every session. I would think a 100p  would also hold collimation well but I would get a Cheshire to check it is. Laser might be over kill for that scope being that the focuser isnt the best for rigidly. In my 130p think the same focuser theres too much slop and the laser would move about too much. A Cheshire would do just fine.

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