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Only my second time observing Saturn last night so thought I'd try imaging it as the sky was nice & clear for once! 

All taken with Sky-Watcher Skyliner 200p + 2x Celestron Barlow + QHY5L-II-C.

FinishedJPEG.jpg

100 frames stacked in AS2!
De-Noise in Registax.
Wavelets in Astra Image 4.0
Cropped & tweaked in CS6.

23/05/16
UT 23:55:23
Lytham, Lancashire, NW UK.


Here's my second attempt. ROI was smaller so it gave me a slightly higher magnification.

FINISHED SATURN GOOD JPG.jpg

120 frames stacked in AS2!
De-Noise in Registax.
Wavelets in Astra Image 4.0
Upscaled & tweaked in CS6.

23/05/16
UT 23:56:14
Lytham, Lancashire, NW UK.

Edited by DOBGUYNORTHWEST
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3 minutes ago, Peco4321 said:

Brilliant. Really shows the difference bigger scopes and better cameras can achieve. I love Saturn. 

Thanks! :)  I can't wait to purchase a higher quality barlow & for my EQ platform to arrive next month, hopefully I'll get much better results.

Saturn is a sight & a half to see through the eyepiece, I love it!

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