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Sketching DSO first attempt


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My nights observations, the moon being at 96% luminosity I don't think helped much but I could see great detail on M13 ☺️
M15 not so much but was still beautiful to look at, my other 3 targets were far to late in the night to observe.
So for my first night of sketching I'm very pleased with the outcome I think the sketches are a good indication of what I saw ✨??

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My only real issue was when I tried to use my new O-lll filter I could hardly see anything threw it.

So I went back to either using my light pollution filter which adds a little extra detail but I was a bit disappointed I couldn't use my new filter.

Ive been told you can only use his filter in specific conditions ie when the moon isn't so bright and other conditions if anyone could clarify this for me I would appreciate it ☺️

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I would be very happy to produce sketches like yours: I'd say "well done". I use a UHC filter which can usually be used to view similar objects as the O-lll, but a near full moon is not going to help, a dark sky with ideally no moon can really show an increase in detail and contrast; have another go then and you may be glad of the investment.

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UHC & OIII filters are intended for nebula and would not offer much advantage on globular clusters. LPR filters are intended to reduce the effects from sodium st lighting so unless you have this particular lighting causing LP in your area no real advantages will be seen.

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An OIII filter is not for use on stellar targets (ie anything made up of stars). It only lets through a very small fraction of the light emitted by them. Use it for looking at planetary nebulae, and supernova remnants. If you get to the stage when you're hunting down planetary nebulae so small that they appear stellar, an OIII filter makes all the difference. You'll find that most (but not all) planetaries appear brighter through an OIII, but the filter makes all the stars in the field look very much fainter, or even invisible. It's a specific tool for a specific job.

Your drawings show much promise. You should put North and East markers so that the drawings can be orientated correctly. Good practice says you should put North at the bottom of your drawings. If you get into this good habit now, it will serve you well in the future. Well done, a really good start to a deep-sky observing career!

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I think those are nice sketches of the DSOs. Well done.

If you want to spend some more time on each image, you could make the stars more circular. But I understand very well if you only drew them as an illustration, while the DSO was the most important subject.

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23 hours ago, Stridor said:

I would be very happy to produce sketches like yours: I'd say "well done". I use a UHC filter which can usually be used to view similar objects as the O-lll, but a near full moon is not going to help, a dark sky with ideally no moon can really show an increase in detail and contrast; have another go then and you may be glad of the investment.

Thank you Stridor I appreciate you kind comments.

I will try and use the filter under dark conditions with no moon and see if my results are different sketching really adds a lot to a session and really makes you focus on what your observing ☺️

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21 hours ago, spaceboy said:

UHC & OIII filters are intended for nebula and would not offer much advantage on globular clusters. LPR filters are intended to reduce the effects from sodium st lighting so unless you have this particular lighting causing LP in your area no real advantages will be seen.

Thank you spaceboy for your help I will only use the filter Nebula in future and hopefully I will see better results when using it thanks again ☺️

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4 hours ago, DeepSkyBagger said:

An OIII filter is not for use on stellar targets (ie anything made up of stars). It only lets through a very small fraction of the light emitted by them. Use it for looking at planetary nebulae, and supernova remnants. If you get to the stage when you're hunting down planetary nebulae so small that they appear stellar, an OIII filter makes all the difference. You'll find that most (but not all) planetaries appear brighter through an OIII, but the filter makes all the stars in the field look very much fainter, or even invisible. It's a specific tool for a specific job.

Your drawings show much promise. You should put North and East markers so that the drawings can be orientated correctly. Good practice says you should put North at the bottom of your drawings. If you get into this good habit now, it will serve you well in the future. Well done, a really good start to a deep-sky observing career!

Thanks for the advise Deepskybagger ?

Im really happy there's nothing wrong with the filter I thought maybe it was faulty.

But what you wrote makes perfect sense concerning how to use the filter for its intended purpose the newbie in me is shining ☺️

I forgot to put North and east but I will for future sketches, thank you for reminding me ☺️

Deep-Sky observing is simply breathtaking it really has got a hold of me.

I like the challenge of really observing the object, not just looking and thinking wow that's nice or pointing a camera for a few hours to get a brilliant image no doubt.

But for me just having the scope and your sketching gear is at the heart of astronomy true observing.

This is just the begin in I want to keep pushing myself to see and observe more detail and create sketches with as much detail and more importantly true to life as possible ☺️

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4 hours ago, Linda said:

I think those are nice sketches of the DSOs. Well done.

If you want to spend some more time on each image, you could make the stars more circular. But I understand very well if you only drew them as an illustration, while the DSO was the most important subject.

Thank you Linda I appreciate you helping me improve I will definitely look at making the stars more circular for my next sketches ☺️

Thank you for your kind words I definitely focused on the DSO I really wanted to capture them as best I could.

But maybe I did overlook the neatness let's say of the other stars size wise I believe they were accurate but as you put they could be a little neater ☺️

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Very beautiful drawings, even more for being the first ones! I wish I could draw as well ! I wonder why M15 became sort of elongated, like an edge on galaxy. Did you see it that way? (No criticism meant here, just wondering!)

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Hi 

37 minutes ago, Cinco Sauces said:

Very beautiful drawings, even more for being the first ones! I wish I could draw as well ! I wonder why M15 became sort of elongated, like an edge on galaxy. Did you see it that way? (No criticism meant here, just wondering!)

Hi Cinco I've been asked this and maybe it was because of the moon being at 96% luminosity I'm not sure but when I was out there I could have sworn that's how I saw it I have a goto 6se scope which I used to view M13 Saturn and Mars that night and it was perfectly aligned?

thank you for your kinds words and any criticism is most welcome ☺️

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Those are excellent sketches Richard, especially as they are your first attempt. Please keep on drawing as it will fine tune your observing skills, and they will inspire others to have a go, as well as being a pleasure to look at.

Mike :headbang:

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5 hours ago, mikeDnight said:

Those are excellent sketches Richard, especially as they are your first attempt. Please keep on drawing as it will fine tune your observing skills, and they will inspire others to have a go, as well as being a pleasure to look at.

Mike :headbang:

Thank you Mike, i was pleasantly surprised how enjoyable I found sketching what I observed, every moment I observed seem all the more precious all the more special because I was taking in every photon that hit my eye to try and get every ounce of detail so I could portray the beauty of what I observed as best I could.

I look forward to sketching again with any luck tonight if the weather permits ☺️

For me this is the only way I want to spend my time with my telescope, truly observing every object I look at instead of just looking ?

Cheers

Richard

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