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mdstuart

callisto about to transit

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Nicks old 130p heritage scope out cooling ready for Callistos transit such starts in 30 mins...

Might try Mars as well.

Mark

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Unfortunately really poor seeing where I am. Jupiter boiling even at 90x and Mars even worse. Have just seen something shoot past Jupiter quickly though which was nice. Am going to have a think about what to look at next but it won't be a planet.

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2 minutes ago, Gavster said:

Unfortunately really poor seeing where I am. Jupiter boiling even at 90x and Mars even worse. Have just seen something shoot past Jupiter quickly though which was nice. Am going to have a think about what to look at next but it won't be a planet.

That'll be the Moon then, same terrible seeing here, not sure if it was Mars or someone juggling an orange :)

Dave

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Had a brief look earlier but no good here so came to bed!

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:hello2:  seeing not bad really here...

Helen

PS just realised I missed my very small Mars window (chain saw anyone???)

2016-05-23-2216_3-L-1_g6_b3_ap4.jpg

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1 minute ago, Helen said:

:hello2:  seeing not bad really here...

Helen

PS just realised I missed my very small Mars window (chain saw anyone???)

2016-05-23-2216_3-L-1_g6_b3_ap4.jpg

Good looking image With the transit clearly visible.  My window is still half an hour away! 

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Thanks Pete, I was quite pleased with it as I'm pretty sure my collimation is way out and I'm too tired to risk that tonight!!

H

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I viewed it visually. Very tough to pick out that little black dot.

I was using a 4.7 mm eyepiece in a Heritage newt.

The dot whizzed a cross the disk. Not a long eclipse for those on Jupiter!

Mark

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