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Mercury Solar Transit. Large wrapup, video


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Hi,

even if there are much nicer images here I like to sum up my experiences, I guess it is still worth a read to compare and learn from my mistakes.

I started to prepare the day before but was to lazy to test the equipment on site, so I just checked batteries and collected all parts. More than a hour before first contact I started to set up everything. I rolled out a cable drum to get power for several hours and the first thing I found is that the power adapters did not fit into the three plug sockets on the cable  drum. Meanwhile the wind started to fresh up and did blow away my sunshade. Good that it does not hit anything of my equipment, getting sun cream it was only for me. Now getting a multiple socket. Found that ony adapter  gives too much voltage which my motorized focusser did not like. Getting a battery. Setting up a sun shade for my laptop.

Then I started to align the NexStar SLT Goto for sun. At least I did try... What worked a few weeks before did not work anymore. I entered 12:xx:xx time then PM and NO SUN IN THE ALIGNMENT menu... Dang, as european I also tried AM because that AM/PM is quite strange for me and errror prone. Checked the sun menu, enabled. Even tried to disable it. Then I realized (now only about 20 minutes to the first contact) that whatever I entered AM/PM the next try the time was at 00:xx:xx, so that stupid scope ignored AM/PM! No chance to get the sun in the menu for alignment. DANG! I was nearly so angry to ditch all that scope into the ground. The I took a depth breath and changed the time zome to 0 (UTC) and substracted  an hour to the entered time, so it now got 11:xx:xx which works with AM/PM... Celestron get your firmware right!

Now focussing which was a bit hard with only the few sun spots and bad seeing. I thought I did it right, but later the mercury was not that sharp as I wished.

I decided to shot every minute bursts of 5 images at ISO 200 and 1/1250s exposure time which looked good on the laptop. Then my intervallometer failed. So I triggered the camera via USB from DigiCamControl. JUST at the first contact time clouds came. DANG. So I did miss a good part of the time between first and second contact, also still struggeling with the intervallometer. After I made a ok image of the second contact I was able to get the intervallometer back to work (note to myself: investigate!) and had firstly a bit time to relax. Posted a image to a friend who was connected via chat with me.

After some time I found that the images on screen where not showing the actual happening which I can see through the DSLR finder. I tried to put the images on my NAS but that seemed to be too slow, so I did gat a big delay. I though it would have been a good idea, so I could get out of the sun and process some images on my Desktop PC while they are coming in. After changing to the local disk things worked better, but then I found that I had a copy image batch in DigiCamControl to make a copy to my Desktop and there my usual Backup tried to back it up via the network (WLAN) also. Which did saturate the network quite easy... I may have worked to save the images on the NAS without that, but now I was using the local disk. HOWEVER. My mount did not track the sun very well, and with my DSLR at 1500mm focal length there is not much room at the top and bottom borders, so I had to correct the FOV every few minutes. Maybe it was the strange workaround I needed to to for the alignment, or I did entered some wrong time (even did use solar tracking speed) or the wind gusts just did their bad. So I was tied to my laptop for hours in the sun. Man I was quite tired that evening :-)

What else went wrong:

  • During the hours I swapped the camera battery and rotated it a bit. Also during messing with my intervallometer
  • bursts are stupid. Too many images, I thought I could stack the 5 images but in the end it was too much work or I did need a script (which costs time to write)
  • I did not refocus
  • dust on my sensor (I guess so. check the video below)
  • before starting a big session set back the image counter in the camera to 0000 so that it will not wrap up and mess your named sequence
  • try everything a day before, don't be lasy
  • even more than an hour setup time can be to few whan things go bad
  • derotation (look at the strange curve of mercury in the video, normal at Alt/az) for the images failed because of the small and unsharp sun spots
  • neighbors cat came to check my equipment. walked across the keyboard, could easy delete all ;-)

Location was in the south of Berlin, Germany. First contact 13:12:07 and because of trees I could image until 17:00 local time.

So a few words for the equipment: Celestron Mak127 NexStarSLT AltAz Goto Mount, Astrosolar filter foil (for visual), Nikon D5100, DigiCamControl to liveview and get images from the SD, DIY motorized focusser and DEW heater control (not used here...), DIY intervallometer (Arduino based).

Software: For single images I used FITSwork and GIMP (2.9.x 32bit/channel). For resequencing, cropping and quality estimation I used PIPP. For making the animations from the sequences, sharpening and encoding I used Blenders video parts and bits (http://blender.org).

Here is a animation of all good images including some clouds, I needed to stop at 17.00 local time (utc+1).

After all I am still happy with my results. No worries here, still like that hobby :-)

Cheers,
Carsten

Solarbeobachtung.jpg

EquipmentCheck.jpg

Solarbeobachtung2.jpg

2016_05_09_MerkurTransit_Stimmungsbild_k.jpg

ZwoterKonakt.jpg

Edited by calli
insert cat
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Worth it all in the end :)

Sounds a bit like my attempt at the solar eclipse a couple of years ago when the scope decided the Sun was on the ground.

Dave

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