Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_lunar_landings.thumb.jpg.b50378d0845690d8a03305a49923eb40.jpg

Recommended Posts

Heres an image from a few nights ago (8th) of a section of the Veil nebula. exposures were not as long as I would have liked due to cloud passing over, conditions were very average. This is a bi-colour image taken through the skywatcher mak Newtonian scope, an Atik 314L plus mono, with a 7 nm h-alpha filter, and an OIII filter. the h-alpha filter was 10 x 5 mins exposures, and the OIII filter was 9 x 5 mins.

Veil 8-5-16).jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a really nice image. I love the fine filaments. This is one of my favorite summer objects although the veil is positioned from my perspective under a sodium street light!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks pyrasanth.............yeah its a great object. Many thanks for the comment...........mmm sodium street light, shotgun anyone??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, wavydavy said:

Thanks pyrasanth.............yeah its a great object. Many thanks for the comment...........mmm sodium street light, shotgun anyone??

I would amend your comment- perhaps to "I hope the bulb goes out..." as you will fall foul of the moderators!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, pyrasanth said:

That's a really nice image. I love the fine filaments. This is one of my favorite summer objects although the veil is positioned from my perspective under a sodium street light!

Narrow-Band is your friend.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, DaveS said:

Narrow-Band is your friend.

it's my best friend.....I danced with her all night!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice! :)

Seeing fantastic bicolors like this i realize I have so much to learn about narrowband processing... But maybe one day... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By tooth_dr
      I scrapped all the Oiii and Sii data I previously took during a full moon (about 15 hours worth) and retook it all when the moon was a bit smaller at 76%.  Ha was taken during 98% and 67% moon.  All the lights were taken on the following nights: 12th, 19th and 20th September 2019.
      Integration times, all in 600s subs unbinned:
      Ha = 28.33 hours
      Oiii= = 5.67 hours
      Sii = 5.67 hours
       
      The Ha data is really nice, and unsurprisingly the Oiii and Sii is not as strong (or nice).
      I'm missing that (vital) step in my processing routine of getting the Sii and Oiii properly stretched to match the Ha, before combining.  I dont really know how to deal with the weaker data properly.  Any pointers would be appreciated.
      What I do currently:
      All the data is loaded into APP into separate channels/sessions.
      The data is stacked and registered against the best Ha sub
      This produces individual stacks of Ha, Sii and Oiii that are all registered
      Each channel is processed with DPP in APP and then saved as a 16bit TIFF
      Each is opened in PS
      Stars removed with AA and any remnants removed and tidied up
      I then open a blank RGB document in PS
      I paste Ha into Green, Sii into Red and Oiii into Blue
      Adjust the selective colour settings to get 'Hubble palette'
      Adjust levels, curves, saturation until looks ok
      All the Ha Sii Oiii data is then combined together in a single 'super' stack in APP using quality weighted algorithm to create a 'luminance'
      That luminance layer is adjusted using levels, curves, and NC tools such as local contrast enhancement and deep space noise reduction (using masks to apply as required)
      The luminance is pasted onto the above colour layer, and incrementally added using gaussian blur
      Cropped and saved.
       
       
      Here it is anyway   I haven't intended on any more exposure time for this one, but will consider it, if the expert opinion dictates otherwise!
       
      CS
      Adam
       


    • By MimasDeathStar
      I heard the sun wasn't very active at the moment. Is it still active when you look through H-Alpha? (I don't really understand the difference!)
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      now the summer heat seems to be gone. It's still sunny but not that hot anymore. Perfect weather for sketching for the H alpha sun:

      Telescope: Lunt LS50THaB600PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-Cel 10mm
      Date & Time: August 30th, 2019 / 1230-1300 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: reddish Koh-i-Noor Toison d'Or pastels and pastel pens on yellowish Canson Mi-Teintes pastel paper
      Clear and sunny skies!
      Achim
    • By Gib007
      THIS ITEM HAS NOW BEEN SOLD.
      This listing is for my personal narrowband filters (Kayron from Light Vortex Astronomy). They are the Astrodon Hydrogen-Alpha (HA), Oxygen-III (OIII) and Sulphur-II (SII) 3nm 1.25" narrowband set. These are considered the highest-end narrowband filters money can buy, able to produce images of exceptional quality and incredible sharpness, cutting through a vast amount of light pollution. The 3nm variants featured here are fantastic for pulling out fine nebulous structures clearly above background. For more information, please see Astrodon's website:
      https://astrodon.com/products/astrodon-narrowband-filters/
      Please note that these three filters together currently retail at just over £1,710 from UK suppliers, €2,180 from European suppliers or $1,690 from US suppliers. Payment is preferred via bank transfer but PayPal is OK with an extra 2.9% to cover PayPal fees. I'll cover postage to you via tracked Courier. 
      I welcome any questions you may have regarding this listing. Thank you for looking. 


    • By MarsG76
      The Omega Nebula, aka The swan Nebula, M17/NGC6618 imaged in Narrowband and combined in Hubble palette style. The photo was imaged with a astromodded and cooled DSLR through a 8" SCT across multiple networks gets from 28 July - 8 August 2019.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.