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Found an old (apparently USA model) celestron C8 SCT a while back,  its a bit hit n miss with collimation and the optics - (some very strange star test shapes :P) but when it works it works well :)

Here is a couple images from a couple months back.

 

Thanks for looking. 

 

This particular night seeing was reasonably good, and collimation wasn't too bad either. angled w astra.pngjupiter sct layer 2.png  Celestron C8 / ASI120MC / 2X barlow - captured in sharpcap2, stacked in autostakkert!2, wavelets in registax6 :)

Edited by Aenima
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Thank you Putaendo Patrick. 

 

Yeah, the good kinda outweighs the bad i always find in astronomy, its worth the hassle when it all comes together one night and you get an image you are happy with. :)

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 Got these crater shots a few weeks before that, quite pleased with the detail despite the soft appearance from mediocre seeing conditions.

 

If i recall rightly it was using a 5xpowermate as well which pushed the scope past its useful limit. I could be wrong and it was just my 3 x barlow. So dont quote me on it - i did however manage to get a useable image that way at one point, so its always worth trying if the conditions allow. :)

 

nuloooner_Capture-30_09_2015-00_25_53_g4_b3_ap10-dd.jpg

 

 

 3rd crater.tif

Edited by Aenima
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Very nice images... How about one of the 'scope too! :evil62:

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Great shots. I also use a celestron 8" SCT and I think its a great scope. 

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Great images.. and I agree, the C8 SCTs are great telescopes.

 

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