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On 4/5/2016 at 10:37, michael.h.f.wilkinson said:

Yesterday was surprisingly good here as well. I wouldn't have minded a C14 last night either.

I remember reading as a young man, and I think it was Patrick Moore who said that the "Skies of England can rival those of South Africa". I experienced a superb night in Cornwall a couple of years back- the stars were wall to wall & the Milky Way was a sight to behold as it stretched from one end of the Horizon to the other. Last night was really clear for a few hours as well as I imaged M82- a good night & I collected some nice photons for my collection.

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Without reading through 3 pages of answers my advice would be to stay well clear of a 14" SCT here in England. I have a 12" and I regret buying that instead of a 10". I'm also in the SE and my seeing is dreadful so, more often than not, the telescope is not getting a chance to show what it is capable of. The most powerful eyepiece I own is 14 mm Radian, which gives a mag of 214 and there are many nights when this is too high.

Also, if you have to set it up and take it down every night you observe then it won't be too long before you tire of it. Mine is permanently set up so I don't have that problem but, if I did, I would not be able to cope - it's just to heavy and cumbersome. Get a 10" and some expensive eyepieces with the money saved.

Cleetus

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56 minutes ago, Cleetus said:

Without reading through 3 pages of answers my advice would be to stay well clear of a 14" SCT here in England. I have a 12" and I regret buying that instead of a 10". I'm also in the SE and my seeing is dreadful so, more often than not, the telescope is not getting a chance to show what it is capable of. The most powerful eyepiece I own is 14 mm Radian, which gives a mag of 214 and there are many nights when this is too high.

Also, if you have to set it up and take it down every night you observe then it won't be too long before you tire of it. Mine is permanently set up so I don't have that problem but, if I did, I would not be able to cope - it's just to heavy and cumbersome. Get a 10" and some expensive eyepieces with the money saved.

Cleetus

Thanks, I'm looking at the Mewlon 250 as well now. I've given up on the c14 until I have a permanent setup. Instead I'm looking at 4 scopes.

 

C11 hd

C9.25 hd

Mewlon 250

Mewlon 210

 

the top 3 are all probably a little too big for the Nova Hitch mount so I may end up having to accept a Mewlon 210 but I'm still looking into it. I kind of need to see one and whether it can technically fit on the mount.

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I've been looking at buying a C8 for visual, and am still undecided about whether to get an Edge or not. Although the off axis benefits of an Edge over a standard Celestron SCT are well established - particularly with wide field eyepieces - there are a lot of owners who also think the on axis views in the Edge are slightly sharper too. Problem is that everyone's experience with cool down time and collimation are different. If you've been using a slightly misaligned standard ota and they then try a well collimated Edge, the results are striking. The subject certainly seems to ignite some strong passions on Cloudy Nights.....

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Mewlon 210 is a great visually and for planet photos - still clung on to mine despite 12 inch RCTs for DSOs - Tony

 

saturn1..jpg

Edited by tony210
wrong photo
  • Like 4

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Should say small dot is not an atrifact but small ice moon Tethys-best wishes Tony

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1 hour ago, tony210 said:

Should say small dot is not an atrifact but small ice moon Tethys-best wishes Tony

That's a superb image.

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I've yet to see a report from an end-users, but Celestron has now come out with their own version of the Meade LX-series ACF scopes. This allows a SCT to, in astrophotography, give the performance of a Ritchey-Chrétien with it's flat, coma-free (?) field-of-view.

Below is their ad for such -

Dave

Celestron with ACF-properties.png

Click image for full-size.

Edited by Dave In Vermont

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Very interesting Dave - thanks for posting. Still not convinced whether you need Starsense with an Evolution mount, but the combination of offering Edge optics with all the other Evo advantages makes sense for Celestron. 

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13 hours ago, Highburymark said:

I've been looking at buying a C8 for visual, and am still undecided about whether to get an Edge or not. Although the off axis benefits of an Edge over a standard Celestron SCT are well established - particularly with wide field eyepieces - there are a lot of owners who also think the on axis views in the Edge are slightly sharper too. Problem is that everyone's experience with cool down time and collimation are different. If you've been using a slightly misaligned standard ota and they then try a well collimated Edge, the results are striking. The subject certainly seems to ignite some strong passions on Cloudy Nights.....

The more I think about this thread the more I concur on the cool down comments. It's only subjective observation but since I have had my obsy which is just over 12 months, the more I am convinced that the views through my standard XLT 9.25" are much better. I leave the OTA mounted in periods of good observing weather and thus it is frequently ready to go at a moments notice. This is particularly apparent on DSOs and from a recent session, globular clusters.

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The 9.25" does appear to be regarded as the best of the standard XLT range - I haven't had the pleasure of viewing through one, but can imagine without any cool down issues it must be a sweet scope.

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Revisiting this and the C14 HD won out. Fingers crossed it performs well.

  • Like 1

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Since the earlier comments I've bought an Edge HD 8" - after fine collimation it is delivering stunning visual results on planets, moon and stars - above my expectations.  Not very relevant when you're buying at 14", but I can certainly recommend the HD optics.

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I had C14 for some time for planetary imaging. It did work with all that resolution it can give, but without active cooling it got temperature lag quite quickly - even after an hour or less after being cooled with fans. In most nights it wasn't able to keep the ambient temperature. As a solution for this year I'll be getting a truss 14" telescope ;) C14 isn't an "overkill" if you can make it work.

Edited by riklaunim

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Thanks, yes I've got tempest fans which I just hope help with the temps.

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