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Messier 1 from Darlington

HA    - 17 x 1200 sec
OIII  - 9 x 1200 sec
S2    - 12 x 1200 sec
red   - 10 x 600  sec
Green - 10 x 600 sec
Blue  - 10 x 600 sec
R.G.B -15 x 60  sec each channel

total 18 hours 25 mins

atik 383l mono Baader filters SW 200pds AZ-EQ6

thanks for looking

 

 

M-1-the CRAB Nebula-jpg-2.jpg

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cracking image Chris, loverly colour and detail, you deff got the processing bang on mate.thanks,   charl.

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Quite beautiful Chris & perfect framing. You've capture the short bulging gas on the lower left too - good stuff.

I'd be tempted to adjust the black point, the background is a shade too light for my taste, maybe pull back on the stars a shade so they don't dominate M1. What do you think?

Congratulations on a real cracking M1 !

Edited by Barry-Wilson
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I was going to make the same point as Barry. It is very rare for me to find a black point too high because I'm an arch advocate of not getting the background too dark. However, here I thnk it could come down a tad for more contrast.

Every aspect of the colour is gorgeous. The background sky is neutral and flat, the star colour is bold and convincing and the nebula is a dream with the full spectrum getting a look in.

Result!

Olly

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It's a great image, Chris. I love the colours! Sweeter than cotton candy.

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wow thanks Barry i will have a look at that black point i have a new monitor so it may need to be calibrated.

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WoW thanks Olly i am trying to keep it looking natural without too much processing.

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hay Barry and Olly please let me know how this looks on your screens 15% more contrast and 20% less brightness.

 

Edited by toxic

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M-1-the CRAB Nebula-jpg-2-15contrast-minus15bright2.jpg

Edited by toxic
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just darkened this image but on here it still looks brighter than in my system

 

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I like the star colours in this image but have mixed feelings about the nebula. I would think either LRGB with HA would have been a better mix of spectrum. I have never seen the crab imaged & combined in every spectrum & the colours are quite loud- almost neon. However the technique is innovative so I take nothing away from that.

The lack of L data has robbed the image of potential detail & the vibrant colours even at the small image scale have masked what detail could have been present. It does not work for me but that is only one opinion among many who do like the image.

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As amazing as your image is, it is just as amazing that you can capture these from UK, light pollution central!! Very nice job and hard work, I'm sure.

 

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thank you Pyrasanth for your input it is much appreciated oh i do have L data but i did not add it to the mix as all it seems to do is bloat the stars and gives way to much gradient.

when i can i will only use NB data for luminance its the only way to combat the light pollution especially from the street light rite next to the obsy.

now galaxies thats another can of worms.

Edited by toxic

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thank you very much VSOP yes it still amazes me getting objects so far away and through the orange soup as well.

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9 hours ago, VSOP said:

As amazing as your image is, it is just as amazing that you can capture these from UK, light pollution central!! Very nice job and hard work, I'm sure.

 

The UK imaging gang are a resilient bunch.

Techniques have to be developed to deal with the light pollution. Have you seen my images of M1 & a subsequent shot in the same thread of the light pollution which I dealt with?. I permanently  have an IDAS LP2 filter in the imaging train & whilst this produces a cast on the L channel it is easy to deal with.

Light pollution can be dealt with but you need a whole arsenal of tools including but not limited to Noels' & Annie's actions, GradientXterminator, PixInsight DBE & noise reduction as well as Photoshop & Startools. If you put all these packages into action you can deal with anything. The light pollution loses you the very faintest details but this can be somewhat mitigated by longer subs & more of them-light pollution decreases your signal to noise ratio. Narrow-band is another option but again you simulate the colour so that needs another level of careful processing & is not a substitute for dark skies.

UK Imaging gang- keep doing what your doing because when you get to Atacama your results will be magnificent!:hello2:

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I like the re-do. What I'd have done with the original, though, is just open it in Levels and move the black point slider to the right. If you have put a few background sky markers in using the Eyedropper Colour Sampler tool you can see in the information palette what the values are. Personally I like 23/23/23 in RGB for most images. This means individual monitors can be ignored.

When you have an L layer (or any other layer) which, like your L layer, has good and bad effects I would think of how to exploit Photoshop levels in order to use it. So you could make an LRGB which might allow you to get more detail out of the Crab itself. Ignore the starfield. Just work on the Crab, then put the new one over the old one and erase the new starfield. (You have to be sure the background sky is at the same level in each.)

Or, with what you have, you could extract a synthetic luminance and process that for detail then recombine it. Again, only use it where it's better. Erase it from the starfield, probably.

I'm a colour nut so I like this image.

Olly

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thanks Olly i think i will try what you say'd when i better understand what it was you say'd lol i will get there eventually.

 

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thanks Barry  MAC only when its raining ;)

 

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