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Astro_Rob

*New Scope* - Finalizing ??

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Greetings,

Hi guys, I have had a great interest in space an astronomy for a while now and found that I could explore the night skies through a telescope!

I have had one small refractor telescope but it was picked up at a boot sale for £5 so I was not expecting miracles, I have now made the decision that I want to upgrade and buy my first proper scope.

I have been researching for a while now, thinking about Celestron's 130 slt and the 5se with my original intention to introduce myself into astrophotography. I then realised it might be too complicated for a beginner and I wanted to focus more on the pure views of deep space and some of our planets.

I have finally settled on the Orion XT10 Dobsobian Newtonian.

image.jpeg

Just to give an idea of the size. I know how big it is and I have room to store it and use it effectively so the size is not a problem for me.

image.jpeg

My reason for this post was just to brush up some final details.

I'm pretty sure that this scope needs collimating from time to time and I wandering which tool would be the best for this, the cap that comes with the scope or should I invest in another method such as the laser collimator or the Cheshire EP.

Also regarding the views, what kind of things would I be able to see with this 10" scope? Would I be able to see galaxies and maybe their spiral arms, nebulae?

Some Basic Scope Specs:

- Aperature: 254mm (10").

- Focal Length: 1200mm.

- Focal Ratio: f/4.7.

- Accepts 2" and 1.24" EPs.

- Lowest Useful Mag: 36x

- Highest Useful Mag: 300x

- Highest Mag: 506x

- Ez Finder II

- Length Of Optical Tube: 47.8"

More detailed specs through link below.

http://www.telescope.com/Orion-SkyQuest-XT10-Classic-Dobsonian-Telescope/p/102006.uts

 

Equpiment Included:

- Sirius Plossl 25mm (1.25") = 48x

- Collimation Cap.

- Some DVD.      

 

I am also thinking of investing in this basic EP kit to get me started, it's a Plossl kit - the same that comes with the Orion scopes. Linked below is the Sirius Plossl series kit. I would be grateful for anything you guys know about these Plossl EPs.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B0186UCI9G/ref=mp_s_a_1_5?qid=1459515993&sr=8-5&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=Eyepiece+kit&dpPl=1&dpID=51YYSxbn9IL&ref=plSrch

 

Any help much appreciated.

Best wishes and clear skies.

Rob

Edited by Astro_Rob

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I am very new to Dobsonians so am not an expert - but perhaps my beginner thoughts would be helpful.  We got our scope only a couple of weeks ago.  It is  a little larger than yours.  It was supplied with a collimating cheshire type thing.  We did collimate with this a couple of times but we were never very 'certain', how accurate we had been.  I decided to get a Howie Glatter laser and a Tubelug.  This was very easy to use and gave a very positive indication when everything was set right.  It wasn't cheap though, but I believe that one has to be careful with laser colimators.  A wise man told me that you needed to check that the laser itself was well collimated before using it to collimate the scope.

As to eyepieces, that same 'wise man' suggested a wide field £600 per shot eyepiece.  We drew the line at that one but perhaps some cheaper widefield eyepieces should be considered?

Good luck - we have been having a great time with our new toy.

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2 minutes ago, Astro_Rob said:

 

Also regarding the views, what kind of things would I be able to see with this 10" scope? Would I be able to see galaxies and maybe their spiral arms, nebulae?

Rob

Hi Rob

The most important thing to understand when observing galaxies and nebulae is it is down to sky contrast not aperture. To get good contrast you must be at a dark sky site. The darker the sky background the more contrast there will be and the more you will see. Simple as that.

Your observing site is THE single most important factor involved in what you will see when turning your scope towards galaxies and nebulae. Do not underestimate the importance of this. The aperture of your scope comes a very definite second. ;) 

Dark skies and good hunting buddy :) 


 

 

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7 minutes ago, gnomus said:

I am very new to Dobsonians so am not an expert - but perhaps my beginner thoughts would be helpful.  We got our scope only a couple of weeks ago.  It is  a little larger than yours.  It was supplied with a collimating cheshire type thing.  We did collimate with this a couple of times but we were never very 'certain', how accurate we had been.  I decided to get a Howie Glatter laser and a Tubelug.  This was very easy to use and gave a very positive indication when everything was set right.  It wasn't cheap though, but I believe that one has to be careful with laser colimators.  A wise man told me that you needed to check that the laser itself was well collimated before using it to collimate the scope.

As to eyepieces, that same 'wise man' suggested a wide field £600 per shot eyepiece.  We drew the line at that one but perhaps some cheaper widefield eyepieces should be considered?

Good luck - we have been having a great time with our new toy.

@gnomus I hope you are having a great time! What EPs are you using if you don't mind me asking and with what scope.

Rob

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As for what tools for collimation - I'd suggest a collimation-cap, which it looks like it's already covered. And I'd get a Cheshire sighting-tube also. Often just called a Cheshire. A laser-collimator can be purchased later, but learning is, in my view, is best done with a cap & Cheshire. Once you've mastered these, a laser can be used in-the-field for a quick fix in the dark.

Good choice of scope! You'll love it!

Dave

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8 minutes ago, swamp thing said:

Hi Rob

The most important thing to understand when observing galaxies and nebulae is it is down to sky contrast not aperture. To get good contrast you must be at a dark sky site. The darker the sky background the more contrast there will be and the more you will see. Simple as that.

Your observing site is THE single most important factor involved in what you will see when turning your scope towards galaxies and nebulae. Do not underestimate the importance of this. The aperture of your scope comes a very definite second. ;) 

Dark skies and good hunting buddy :) 


 

 

@swamp thing thanks for your reply, I have a few crystal clear sights that are pitch black in mind. Thank you for informing me of this possible problem.

Best wishes 

Rob ?

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2 minutes ago, Dave In Vermont said:

As for what tools for collimation - I'd suggest a collimation-cap, which it looks like it's already covered. And I'd get a Cheshire sighting-tube also. Often just called a Cheshire. A laser-collimator can be purchased later, but learning is, in my view, is best done with a cap & Cheshire. Once you've mastered these, a laser can be used in-the-field for a quick fix in the dark.

Good choice of scope! You'll love it!

Dave

@Dave In Vermont thanks for your help Dave. I will take your information and use it wisely and learn with the Collimation cap.

Best wishes, clear skies.

Rob

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16 minutes ago, Astro_Rob said:

@gnomus I hope you are having a great time! What EPs are you using if you don't mind me asking and with what scope.

Rob

We most certainly are (I am not using the Royal 'We', the wife enjoys stargazing too!).  We've enjoyed the challenge of finding objects for ourselves rather than using GOTO - it somehow seems a bit more rewarding and it has meant that we spend a little longer on each object that we did when using the 'handset'.  Plus some objects are much more impressive in our scope than we have seen them before, I assume because of the larger aperture.  We have a 14.5 incher.  Here are 'reports' of our first two sessions - but do please bear in mind that we haven't much of a clue what we are doing - you will be more successful than us I am sure:

https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/266571-where-on-earth-is-m81/

https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/266763-telrad-placement-where-on-earth-is-m81-part-ii/ 

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7 minutes ago, gnomus said:

We most certainly are (I am not using the Royal 'We', the wife enjoys stargazing too!).  We've enjoyed the challenge of finding objects for ourselves rather than using GOTO - it somehow seems a bit more rewarding and it has meant that we spend a little longer on each object that we did when using the 'handset'.  Plus some objects are much more impressive in our scope than we have seen them before, I assume because of the larger aperture.  We have a 14.5 incher.  Here are 'reports' of our first two sessions - but do please bear in mind that we haven't much of a clue what we are doing - you will be more successful than us I am sure:

https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/266571-where-on-earth-is-m81/

https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/266763-telrad-placement-where-on-earth-is-m81-part-ii/ 

@gnomus I too prefer the idea of observing and finding the objects myself, not giving the GOTO hate I just think like you do that when you find something you will stay on it longer and enjoy the results at a greater amount - the THRILL! I will take a look at the links now.

Also would you reccomend the Luminous series or the X-Cel?

Edited by Astro_Rob

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I have the Skywatcher 10" with similar specs and I have seen a whole host of objects. Beaner is spot on, don't buy an EP set. Try what you have on the targets you want and see what you think you are missing. The 10" is such a jack of all trades that it does many things well, from great planetary views to faint galaxies and clusters. My best experiences and views with mine were the initial wow moments of Saturn, M13, Albireo and the double cluster, followed by the more patient joys of smaller open clusters, doubles, planetary nebulas and galaxies. Most galaxies and nebula are always going to be faint, but I have seen plenty enough to be impressed with my choice.

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1 minute ago, Astro_Rob said:

@gnomus I too prefer the idea of observing and finding the objects myself, not giving the GOTO hate I just think like you do that when you find something you will stay on it longer and enjoy the results at a greater amount - the THRILL! I will take a look at the links now.

Oh sorry you asked about eyepieces too.  We are using the Celestron Luminos eyepieces.  We haven't really needed anything more than the neat little 31 mm.  I remember how hard I laughed when I first took this out its box and saw the size of the thing.  You could play American football with it.  I doubt my eyepieces will be as good as the Televue Naglers, Delos or (if you want proper wallet shock-and-awe) the Ethos.

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5 minutes ago, MattJenko said:

I have the Skywatcher 10" with similar specs and I have seen a whole host of objects. Beaner is spot on, don't buy an EP set. Try what you have on the targets you want and see what you think you are missing. The 10" is such a jack of all trades that it does many things well, from great planetary views to faint galaxies and clusters. My best experiences and views with mine were the initial wow moments of Saturn, M13, Albireo and the double cluster, followed by the more patient joys of smaller open clusters, doubles, planetary nebulas and galaxies. Most galaxies and nebula are always going to be faint, but I have seen plenty enough to be impressed with my choice.

Matt is spot on.  M13 blew me away when I first saw it through the Dob.

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2 minutes ago, gnomus said:

Oh sorry you asked about eyepieces too.  We are using the Celestron Luminos eyepieces.  We haven't really needed anything more than the neat little 31 mm.  I remember how hard I laughed when I first took this out its box and saw the size of the thing.  You could play American football with it.  I doubt my eyepieces will be as good as the Televue Naglers, Delos or (if you want proper wallet shock-and-awe) the Ethos.

@gnomus The Luminos EPs seem very good, I think I might start my little collection.

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8 minutes ago, MattJenko said:

I have the Skywatcher 10" with similar specs and I have seen a whole host of objects. Beaner is spot on, don't buy an EP set. Try what you have on the targets you want and see what you think you are missing. The 10" is such a jack of all trades that it does many things well, from great planetary views to faint galaxies and clusters. My best experiences and views with mine were the initial wow moments of Saturn, M13, Albireo and the double cluster, followed by the more patient joys of smaller open clusters, doubles, planetary nebulas and galaxies. Most galaxies and nebula are always going to be faint, but I have seen plenty enough to be impressed with my choice.

@MattJenko I am really looking forward now to exploring the night sky. The things you have seen sound amazing I just can't wait!!

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13 minutes ago, MattJenko said:
5 minutes ago, Astro_Rob said:

@gnomus The Luminos EPs seem very good, I think I might start my little collection.

A others have said, I'd maybe hang on a bit.  I don't know how well thought of the Luminos are.  I don't see a whole load of people shouting from the rooftops about them.  We like them however.  If you do go Luminos be prepared for the 31mm - it's a monster (around a kilo in weight and a good few inches in diameter).

Edited by gnomus

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4 minutes ago, Astro_Rob said:

@MattJenko I am really looking forward now to exploring the night sky. The things you have seen sound amazing I just can't wait!!

And just wait until you point your Dob at the Moon! How could I forget that!

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2 minutes ago, Astro_Rob said:

@gnomus Just wondering is that all you need - the 31mm or do you also have a Barlow and some higher magnifications?

Rob - please do bear in mind that we are inexperienced.  Having said that we have used the 31mm maybe 95% of the time.  The only time we went higher is when we looked at Jupiter and the moon.  Most of the stuff we have found fitted nicely in the field of view - the Owl Cluster was glorious.  In fact, the problem sometimes was too much magnification - the double cluster was a tight squeeze and M44 and M45 were too large.

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Gnomus is right in that one of the joys of  larger aperture instument is that lower power views are so rewardng because of the light gathering power. You will be surprised at how large some of the targets you will be viewng actually are. Also, with the Dob, another delight is simply taking in the star field fields as you star hop around the sky, and this is best done with a nice comfortable low power EP.

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3 minutes ago, gnomus said:

Rob - please do bear in mind that we are inexperienced.  Having said that we have used the 31mm maybe 95% of the time.  The only time we went higher is when we looked at Jupiter and the moon.  Most of the stuff we have found fitted nicely in the field of view - the Owl Cluster was glorious.  In fact, the problem sometimes was too much magnification - the double cluster was a tight squeeze and M44 and M45 were too large.

Okay I understand now. So you would reccomend me to get a EP with a large FOV?

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I think we would find it more difficult star-hopping with a high mag widefield eyepiece - so we started with our widest, thinking that we would then move up the mag when we found the object.  However, we've rarely felt the need to increase magnification.

...  You know .... the more i think about it ..... that advice to hang on was poor - you need that widefield eyepiece now ..... just buy one of these ... you know it makes sense:

http://www.telescopehouse.com/eyepieces/televue-eyepieces/televue-ethos/televue-21-0mm-ethos-eyepiece-2-0.html

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4 minutes ago, MattJenko said:

Gnomus is right in that one of the joys of  larger aperture instument is that lower power views are so rewardng because of the light gathering power. You will be surprised at how large some of the targets you will be viewng actually are. Also, with the Dob, another delight is simply taking in the star field fields as you star hop around the sky, and this is best done with a nice comfortable low power EP.

Ahh, I thought I needed some high magnifications to just about see the main objects. Thank you both for clearing this up for me ? @gnomus And @MattJenko

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3 minutes ago, gnomus said:

I think we would find it more difficult star-hopping with a high mag widefield eyepiece - so we started with our widest, thinking that we would then move up the mag when we found the object.  However, we've rarely felt the need to increase magnification.

...  You know .... the more i think about it ..... that advice to hang on was poor - you need that widefield eyepiece now ..... just buy one of these ... you know it makes sense:

http://www.telescopehouse.com/eyepieces/televue-eyepieces/televue-ethos/televue-21-0mm-ethos-eyepiece-2-0.html

Haha @gnomus Looks great but my budget is a bit tight. Just to clarify were you being serious or joking? 

Also because my Dob will have no motor will it be able to support the luminous without dipping?

Edited by Astro_Rob

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