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iksose7

NGC1333 and M1

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Recently had a go at reprocessing a DSLR image taken back in 2014, so here it is. NGC1333 in Perseus, made up of just under 19 hours hours of 10 minute subs. Much happier with this version, been wanting to reprocess it since about a month after posting the original! I have since moved on to CCD and also got round to putting together the tiny amount of RGB i captured for M1, at under 3 hours in total. Hope you enjoy, more information about the objects can be found on my Flickr page for those interested in that sort of thing!

25022190583_8a1e8335c3_b.jpg

 

Exposure Details:

113* 600 secs, ISO 800

 

25592392405_4ff002002f_b.jpg

 

Exposure Details:
R: 6x600s - G:4x600s - B:6x600s


Scope: Altair Astro 115EDT
Camera: Canon 600Da (NGC1333) Atik 383L (M1)
Mount: NEQ6

Callum

Edited by iksose7
  • Like 16

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That NGC1333 is simply awsome! :)

I didn't know you'd be able to capture that much details and faint dust with a 600D at all. Did you use any special filters? how's the light polution where you're imaging from?

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Great images, especially NGC 1333. The effort that went into it really shows.

Thanks for sharing

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Cheers guys

1 hour ago, Jannis said:

I didn't know you'd be able to capture that much details and faint dust with a 600D at all. Did you use any special filters? how's the light polution where you're imaging from?

No special filters Jannis, just the DSLR which is astromodified. Not much light pollution here which does help, but i honestly think processing is more than half the battle when producing an image like this, where i used certain techniques to extract the dust :)

Callum

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Great stuff. Fabulous dust around 1333. Maybe a bit short on the unusual yellow nebulosity but the blue and the dust are truly stunning and the image holds together beautifully.

The Crab is a feisty image with real attitude as well and the hardest part, the background sky and the stars, are first class.

Super.

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice

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Thanks Olly, there is actually some very faint blue coming through in the dust clouds around the main nebula itself. I was confused by this but did find a wide field image that confirms that its there. I hope to try this one again some day with the highter sensitivity of a CCD!

Callum 

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Fabulous. Im just trying to think if ive ever seen a better DSLR 1333? Very impressive.

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On ‎2016‎-‎03‎-‎17 at 21:27, iksose7 said:

Cheers guys

[...] processing is more than half the battle when producing an image like this, where i used certain techniques to extract the dust :)

Callum

Please share some details of how you managed this. I'm always interested to see how experts can extract so much out of their data.

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Hi Wim,

I couldnt really explain full without writing up a proper tutorial. But put simply, the way i go about extracting anything faint is to remove the stars as best as possible using star masks and the tools available in PI, then extract the large scale residual layer, work on it with HDR and contrast adjustments, then throw it back together with the stars and small scale structures. For this image i created an exaggerated version (which i just explained) showing much more dust than this, then a more natural version and worked with Pixel Math to combine the aspects i liked from each version (with the use of star, range and luminance masks) until i got a desired result. I know this probably doesnt help too much but hopefully gives you an idea! I do plan on making tutorials some day.

Callum

  • Like 1

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Two excellent images here Callum, especially NGC133, lovely dust capture - well done & congratulations.

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I love the ngc1333 image Callum it as to be one of the best dslr images out there. Ho yeah the crabs not bad either.

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Cheers fellas, would love to return to NGC1333 some day with the CCD to see what difference it makes. I think it will be a big one!

Callum

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Super images. I particularly like the dust in 1333 - top stuff.

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Crikey, that NGC1333 is good!  

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On ‎2016‎-‎03‎-‎19 at 21:17, iksose7 said:

Hi Wim,

I couldnt really explain full without writing up a proper tutorial. But put simply, the way i go about extracting anything faint is to remove the stars as best as possible using star masks and the tools available in PI, then extract the large scale residual layer, work on it with HDR and contrast adjustments, then throw it back together with the stars and small scale structures. For this image i created an exaggerated version (which i just explained) showing much more dust than this, then a more natural version and worked with Pixel Math to combine the aspects i liked from each version (with the use of star, range and luminance masks) until i got a desired result. I know this probably doesnt help too much but hopefully gives you an idea! I do plan on making tutorials some day.

Callum

Thanks for the description. Yes, it does help getting the general workflow. The problem with detailed tutorials is that unless you have the authors data, the settings of tools (in PI) is often useless, since you have to adjust it to your own data anyway. Just showing the workflow can be a starting point for experimentation.

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