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Heres one from the other night, it nearly escaped me this part of the season, due to its very awkward position in the sky, and the presence of looming light pollution.  Had some issues with my PA so, started imaging again on the shorter focal length w/o zenithstar 70ED, so was looking for something large enough to be worthy of the imaging through the Williams, so opted for this large PN in Lynx, Jones emberson 1. This was a stack of 15 x 6 mins, with a 7nm h-alpha filter.........

Jones emberson 1 (14-3-16).jpg

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