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hi all,

tonight I am going out to a local place that is pitch black as far as light pollution.

some of you may already know that i have a skymax 127 and a Nikon d3300 ( T-ring mount too ) so i am wondering what is the best way for me to image the moon ? should i do loads of photos with short or long exposure and stack them ? should i just do 1 long exposure photo ? or just a quick exposure photo ? 

sorry for sounding like a total novice but i am ha ha thank you again all i have learnt so much from you guys :) 

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2 minutes ago, stedavey123 said:

i have had all but a 2 minuet go at registax as ive not as yet needed it BUT i do know as i was playing around i noticed my can saves files as a .mov and registax wont accept this ... any advice ?

Run the .mov file through PIPP to convert it to .avi

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Just now, hitmanh said:

Any reason not to take good old fashion high res single shots? Should get a good view with that setup and with the brightness and reasonable ISO pretty low noise.

No there is no reason why to be honest the truth of the matter is my zoom is not that great with the camera lens and when i have taken shot via telescope before they were not that detailed. i want to get some good detail if i can 

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1 minute ago, stedavey123 said:

No there is no reason why to be honest the truth of the matter is my zoom is not that great with the camera lens and when i have taken shot via telescope before they were not that detailed. i want to get some good detail if i can 

Fair enough, I was just wondering the detail difference between high res single shots versus lower-res but stacked video images.

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I would go for single frames - take about 150-200 (not a typo - go for about two hundred!) and stack the best 50 of them.  I think you will be surprised at the result :wink2:.

Try for the best focus that you can (as the Moon is almost full try and focus on the edge that is showing some shadows of craters) and set the exposure so that there are no "pure white" saturated regions.  

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Stacking 100 or so RAW files is definitely one of the better ways. Here is an example of a single frame and the final result of the stacking method. I converted them to an AVI file using PIPP and then stacked those frames using AS!2 and then onto Registax6 for wavelet sharpening. Give it a go.

 

 

689A2567.jpg

Edited by Leveye
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Hi. Like Roger, I take roughly 200-300 shots at as short as possible an exposure time and as low ISO as possible - jpeg seems to work well. At almost full moon I've managed to get 1/800 sec and ISO 100 through my SW200PDS. At such short exposure times, any blurring effect which comes from the atmosphere movement is minimised and the low ISO maximises the image quality. Then I usually find I can select up to 100 good images which I then throw at Autostakkert and tell it to take the best 50% of what I can see are the best by eye. Process the resulting stack in Register using the wavelets function.

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WOW guys thanks so much .... defiantly going to give that a go ... what the best procedure to take to photos ? is it a case of sitting there with the remote ? or is there some camera settings?

17 hours ago, Leveye said:

Stacking 100 or so RAW files is definitely one of the better ways. Here is an example of a single frame and the final result of the stacking method. I converted them to an AVI file using PIPP and then stacked those frames using AS!2 and then onto Registax6 for wavelet sharpening. Give it a go.

 

 

689A2567.jpg

this photo is amazing !!! so was it a video that you had converted to get that final photo ? if so could you give me an idea on what exactly i should do to get a similar result please 

 

thank you 

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I used a remote on my DSLR for mine. I suggest a tracking mount in the proper tracking mode. The above was done by hand using a PortaII mount. I kept centering the moon in the camera's liveview and I'd then snap about 5-6 pictures and then recenter.I did 130 total RAW images at ISO 100 and 1/500th a second using an 8" Newt. This introduced some unwanted rotation in the series of pictures. Lesson learned there. The RAW files then go Into PIPP using full disc mode and are cropped and centered and turned into an AVI series. Then that goes into AS!2 for stacking and debayering. That is saved as a Tiff and then on to Registax6 for some sharpening using the wavelets. I save the final as A Tiff and then do some final tweeking in PS. Seemed to work the best for me. I have not had good results using Registax to do the stacking. AS!2 removed the unwanted rotation that Registax would not. I'm still learning.

Edited by Leveye
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4 hours ago, stedavey123 said:

WOW guys thanks so much .... defiantly going to give that a go ... what the best procedure to take to photos ? is it a case of sitting there with the remote ? or is there some camera settings?

this photo is amazing !!! so was it a video that you had converted to get that final photo ? if so could you give me an idea on what exactly i should do to get a similar result please 

 

thank you 

I use a remote and set the DSLR to continuous shooting and just leave it for a couple of minutes. I have synscan tracking on my HEQ5 mount which keeps the moon in the same place in all the frames. 

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5 minutes ago, brrttpaul said:

I have tried doing the moon which I took last night, but im obviously doing something wrong as i had the whole moon in but when im using registax it seems to be zoomed right in and i cant see a zoom out button

at the top of registacks there is a button that says show full image click that it should do the trick :)  

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On 23 February 2016 at 17:31, stedavey123 said:

No there is no reason why to be honest the truth of the matter is my zoom is not that great with the camera lens and when i have taken shot via telescope before they were not that detailed. i want to get some good detail if i can 

Hi Ste

When you say not detailed, what exactly do you mean? Blurry, noisy, over exposure (blown out images), under exposure (dark images)? 

What settings were you using for the images you say aren't detailed?

 

I also totally agree with RSM. however I have absolutely no idea about AS!2 or Registax as I'm very VERY new to the astrophotography side of things. Hope you find a method that works for you.

 

Gav

Edited by Astro_gav
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5 hours ago, Astro_gav said:

Hi Ste

When you say not detailed, what exactly do you mean? Blurry, noisy, over exposure (blown out images), under exposure (dark images)? 

What settings were you using for the images you say aren't detailed?

 

I also totally agree with RSM. however I have absolutely no idea about AS!2 or Registax as I'm very VERY new to the astrophotography side of things. Hope you find a method that works for you.

 

Gav

Hi gav, 

if you scroll up you'll find the photos that Leveye posted ... my photos look like the first pic ... i obviously want them to look like the second pic however i did know know that i had to take lots and lots of photos and stack them inn dss to achieve this ... so im going to have a go tonight :)

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