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baggywrinkle

The New Cosmos - David J Eicher: CUP

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The New Cosmos - David J Eicher: CUP ISBN 978-1-107-06885-8

I picked this book up at the Cambridge Univ Press book shop in Cambridge just before Christmas intending to read it over the holiday period. That did not happen.

David Eicher writes for the Astronomy magazine in the US and this rather nice hardback tome is a series of 17 articles on the latest science with regards to many astronomical topics.

It starts with an intro 'The awakening of astronomy' and then proceeds outwards from Earth, 'How the Sun will die', End of Life on earth', How the Moon formed' It covers both planetary and deep space.

Excellent articles on the latest science of the Milky Way, how big is the Universe and then onto Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Black Holes.

Each chapter is stand alone and the book can be picked up and put down, the chapters cover a short history of the subject and then introduce the latest science and thinking.. There are some beautiful illustrations and photos.

There is just about something for everyone and I would give it a 9/10.

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