Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_android_vs_ios_winners.thumb.jpg.803608cf7eedd5cfb31eedc3e3f357e9.jpg

Adamchiv

Is this really what a 10inch dobs can do?

Recommended Posts

3 minutes ago, todd8137 said:

All good, sounds about right  then but am sure the bands would be there 

pat

image.gif

I think im gonna try spend longer at the eyepiece, ive got a feeling that could be the main problem. If I can see the bands like in this diagram i'll be much happier. Cheers, adam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Adamchiv said:

 Im using the skywatcher EPs that came with the scope by the way if that makes a lot of difference. With the barlow plus the 10mm its very blurry and bright.

With the Skywatcher EPs and Barlow (the better Celestron-style type) that came with my scope I can see the GRS and have seen the shadows of moons on Jupiter as well as various bands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A while ago I did this image to show what Jupiter looked like through my C9.25 at different magnifications under good seeing conditions.

Jupiter1.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont get those stripes like that on mine, its really bright through all the eyepieces and just get 2 very faint light brown bands for a split second. Is it the seeing conditions? And does it constantly look like that or just at the best moments? Thanks, adam

P.s sky was very clear but bad light pollution and lights near the telescope

Edited by Adamchiv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On nights of better seeing (rare) more detail can be seen.

Most nights will see detail fade in and out. You just have to be patient. Seeing fine planetary detail takes practise.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Mr Spock said:

On nights of better seeing (rare) more detail can be seen.

So would you say that what I saw was quite normal? Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seeing would have to be pretty bad to have only two belts and have them fading in and out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Mr Spock said:

Seeing would have to be pretty bad to have only two belts and have them fading in and out.

Im not quite sure whether I was seeing the best I could for the conditions or if there was a problem with my kit. It was very bright and the light was sort of blobbing off the side of the disc. When looking at the moon to check if my scope etc was ok the craters were sharp and it was totally fine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had two goes at Jupiter (over my neighbour's house) and I saw more the second time. With a 150p with 10mm x 2 I'm at x150 magnification and its like the little pea picture posted above. Id say the seeing was similar each time but my second viewing was much longer and I perched on my ladder. After 45 mins I had seen the two equatorial bands and two bands either side of that. I also enjoyed seeing the moons being different colours (although I haven't checked if that was right or my imagination). I'd say you have the same questions as me but advice on this group does bear out. I think a good study of Jupiter's bands in a diagram or proper photo helps the eye know what is possible so its more likely to 'grab' the detail when it briefly presents itself. I find the same with star colour, Betelgeuse now seems incredibly red to me compared to a couple of months ago. By the end of the year I'll be naked eying Io's shadow transiting ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How near are you to Heaton Park, Adam? They run an astronomy society there on a Thursday evening, which I sometimes attend. Might be worth going down on a good evening (not that there have been many of those this season), I'm sure someone will give you a hand and let you borrow some different eyepieces - if I'm there, I'd be happy to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rockystar said:

How near are you to Heaton Park, Adam? They run an astronomy society there on a Thursday evening, which I sometimes attend. Might be worth going down on a good evening (not that there have been many of those this season), I'm sure someone will give you a hand and let you borrow some different eyepieces - if I'm there, I'd be happy to.

Hi, im within walking distance to heaton park, was gonna go last thursday but was a little shy I suppose. I do want to attend and im seriously thinking about going next thursday, just didnt wanna look daft turning up with only a couple of meetings left. Im sure thats not gonna be the case though, thanks for the offer and I will be very likely going to the next meeting! My most recent viewing of jupiter which I didnt report showed 4 cloud bands and "possibly" the red spot. I was very happy with the session and the scope was performing better as id let it cool down for a while this time. 

Regards,

Adam

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW, with my SW 130p (the 650mm focal length one - I think there's another one?), I can normally only see the two main bands, and sometimes hints of the temperate belts - but it takes time, patience, and a cooled scope. Usually I'd be using a 5mm BST Starguider as the eyepiece. 

However, much depends on the conditions. Sometimes, that 5mm is just too much magnification. Then at other times... well, I did one remarkable night use a 4mm eyepiece, and have a fairly sharp view of Jupiter, with the Great Red Spot coming around. That was a rare night, though.

I also find that, for some reason, Jupiter seems to look good through a slightly hazy air. If conditions are a bit hazy I think maybe the air is more stable? I'm not sure, but I've read others make the same observation.

Personally, I don't get on well with Barlows. I'm sure good ones do their job with little fuss - but I'm just not willing to fork out for a good Barlow. Poor ones can degrade the view.

Using my 10" scope on Jupiter, though, can be a revelation. On a night of bad seeing, it doesn't really help all that much. On a night of good seeing, though, I can watch Ganymede pass in front of the planet. I can see shadow transits, and the Great Red Spot is easy. Multiple bands are visible, with details on the equatorial bands. It's resolution just knocks spots off the 130p. And I don't think I've had a magnificent night with it, yet.

What I would say is that night shows Jupiter at that kind of size. It's still small, but smaller and with detail is better, I think. Normally, I use magnifications of x130 in the 130p, and x200 (if the night will support it) in the 250px.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, AndyWB said:

FWIW, with my SW 130p (the 650mm focal length one - I think there's another one?), I can normally only see the two main bands, and sometimes hints of the temperate belts - but it takes time, patience, and a cooled scope. Usually I'd be using a 5mm BST Starguider as the eyepiece. 

However, much depends on the conditions. Sometimes, that 5mm is just too much magnification. Then at other times... well, I did one remarkable night use a 4mm eyepiece, and have a fairly sharp view of Jupiter, with the Great Red Spot coming around. That was a rare night, though.

I also find that, for some reason, Jupiter seems to look good through a slightly hazy air. If conditions are a bit hazy I think maybe the air is more stable? I'm not sure, but I've read others make the same observation.

Personally, I don't get on well with Barlows. I'm sure good ones do their job with little fuss - but I'm just not willing to fork out for a good Barlow. Poor ones can degrade the view.

Using my 10" scope on Jupiter, though, can be a revelation. On a night of bad seeing, it doesn't really help all that much. On a night of good seeing, though, I can watch Ganymede pass in front of the planet. I can see shadow transits, and the Great Red Spot is easy. Multiple bands are visible, with details on the equatorial bands. It's resolution just knocks spots off the 130p. And I don't think I've had a magnificent night with it, yet.

What I would say is that night shows Jupiter at that kind of size. It's still small, but smaller and with detail is better, I think. Normally, I use magnifications of x130 in the 130p, and x200 (if the night will support it) in the 250px.

 

 

 

Great information thanks. I noticed that when the sky was very clear, jupiter was very bright, a little too bright to really see any detail. When it was almost clear with a little haze and some cloud I had better views. My first upgrade is gonna be a 10" goto dobs, it will be perfect for me I think. That will be next year though, my next step is to get a decent planetary lens and filters.

Regards,

Adam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.