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The eclipse of Jupiter's moons


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Just come in from viewing Jupiter and picked up Turn Left At Orion for a bit read about it. There's a bit that says Jupiter's moons eclipse each other every six years and to watch out for this in 2015-16. Got some questions from a novice if anyone can help.

Is there just one eclipse in this time or more than one with there being four moons we can see?

Have I missed the eclipse/eclipses?

Can you see much when they occur?

Thanks

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Most of the astronomy magazines carrying information about the occultation's and transits of Jupiter's moons. They do occur frequently.

The moon in question will disappear behind one side of Jupiter and later emerge the other side. Sometimes the moons are silhouetted against Jupiter (a proper transit) and other times there is a shadow transit where the the moon is away from the dics but its shadow is cast on the disc of Jupiter.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/wp-content/uploads/WebJphenTab2016.pdf

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14 hours ago, baggywrinkle said:

Most of the astronomy magazines carrying information about the occultation's and transits of Jupiter's moons. They do occur frequently.

The moon in question will disappear behind one side of Jupiter and later emerge the other side. Sometimes the moons are silhouetted against Jupiter (a proper transit) and other times there is a shadow transit where the the moon is away from the dics but its shadow is cast on the disc of Jupiter.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/wp-content/uploads/WebJphenTab2016.pdf

Thanks for the reply and also the link which will come in handy when viewing Jupiter in the future.

I was actually trying to find out about when the moons eclipse each other, which I believe is called a Mutual Event (I'm learning all the time). I've done a little research and believe the last of these eclipses were last April so looks like I've missed them. Just have to wait another six years apparently. :icon_scratch:

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1 hour ago, Cheviot said:

Thanks for the reply and also the link which will come in handy when viewing Jupiter in the future.

I was actually trying to find out about when the moons eclipse each other, which I believe is called a Mutual Event (I'm learning all the time). I've done a little research and believe the last of these eclipses were last April so looks like I've missed them. Just have to wait another six years apparently. :icon_scratch:

Don't worry, the weather gods are already preparing a broth of clouds for the next occultation. Just for you :)

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On ‎12‎.‎02‎.‎2016 at 01:30, Cheviot said:

Just come in from viewing Jupiter and picked up Turn Left At Orion for a bit read about it. There's a bit that says Jupiter's moons eclipse each other every six years and to watch out for this in 2015-16. Got some questions from a novice if anyone can help.

Is there just one eclipse in this time or more than one with there being four moons we can see?

Have I missed the eclipse/eclipses?

Can you see much when they occur?

Thanks

Yes its true that the moons eclipse each other a short season every six years or so, and I think last time was late 2014.

This must not however be confused With the much more regular shadow transits.

I think this one is ok : http://www.calsky.com/cs.cgi   (choose Planets - Jupiter and then  e.g apparent view/data or Jovian moons.)

Edit : Sorry Cheviot, didnt notice Your second post.

Rune

Edited by Pondus
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9 hours ago, Dave In Vermont said:

Here's a neat, little freeware-program that will show you what Jupiter's moons are up to - anytime in time. And also the Great Red Spot (GRS):

http://www.astrosurf.com/rondi/jupiter/

I hope you can find it useful,

Dave

Not seen that one before Dave, thanks.

 

Sky and Telescope website has a number of interactive tools you can use including one that shows the position of Jupiter's moons and upcoming interactions between them. You have to register (for free) but this is not a big issue. I have used this for many years and find it to be an excellent resource.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/interactive-sky-watching-tools/

Edited by David Smith
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