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Tim

M76 -Little Dumbell or Pretzel Nebula

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I wish I had the time to go back and re-stack and process all the data obtained over the years, with the benefit of new software and tools. Specifically, using Pixinsight.

But I don't so will just do the best I can with the remaining pictures in my "Still to be Done" folder. 

Pretty sure I haven't posted this one before here, although a version with the same data has been on astrobin for a while.

C11 Edge, Atik 428, Ha, Oiii, Sii, RGB filters all mixed, mashed, used and abused.

M76 has some really faint ears at the top end. They only show in Ha exposures, and even then, only just. Hardly ever see them in amateur images, and try as I might, I can't get enough signal from them to bring them out properly. A challenge for another day perhaps.

M76-HaOiiiSiiRGB-C11-EdgeHD-Atik428.jpg

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That's a great rendition of an image that we often see rather small in the frame - I'd never really seen it in such a way before, Very nice indeed Tim :)

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Another one "pulled outta that hat" ;)

The challenge of slow scopes at long FL really pays off on stuff like this... luv it Tim

err.. any 3 hr exposures for those "ears"?

 

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Excellent image of a "tiny" target Tim, I've had a couple of goes at it with 10"SCT over the years, including recently, but it doesn't stay in the ideal spot for long, maybe next year :)

Dave

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